#Carnegie Hall Tumblr posts

  • rastronomicals
    25.06.2021 - 8 hours ago

    10:01 PM EDT June 24, 2021:

    Stan Getz, João Gilberto, Astrud Gilberto - "Bim Bom" From the album   Getz/Gilberto # 2 - Live at Carnegie Hall (April 1966)

    Last song scrobbled from iTunes at Last.fm

    File under: New Trend

    #Stan Getz João Gilberto Astrud Gilberto #Getz/Gilberto 2 - Live at Carnegie Hall #Bim Bom
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  • flommischen
    19.06.2021 - 5 days ago
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  • rastronomicals
    14.06.2021 - 1 week ago

    11:17 AM EDT June 14, 2021:

    Stan Getz, João Gilberto, Astrud Gilberto - "O Pato" From the album   Getz/Gilberto # 2 - Live at Carnegie Hall (April 1966)

    Last song scrobbled from iTunes at Last.fm

    File under: New Trend

    #Stan Getz João Gilberto Astrud Gilberto #Getz/Gilberto 2 - Live at Carnegie Hall #O Pato
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  • jenniedavis
    13.06.2021 - 1 week ago
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  • fashionsfromhistory
    11.06.2021 - 1 week ago

    Dress worn by Renée Fleming at Carnegie Hall

    Reem Akra

    2011

    Hindman Auctions

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  • juluzsg
    11.06.2021 - 2 weeks ago

    Nota: 9/10 

    AOTY: 1962

    Judy Garland, Judy at Carnegie Hall (1962)

    2 horas de álbum. Porém, de tanto ouvir jazz estou começando a gostar. Tem tanto instrumental de Over the Rainbow que pensei que teria uma overdose, mas como ela é um verdadeiro exemplo de lendária eu perdoo

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  • thescoundrelprincess
    10.06.2021 - 2 weeks ago

    Happy Birthday, Judy Garland. May your legacy live on forever ❤️

    (June 10, 1922 - June 22, 1969)
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  • haruosaki
    08.06.2021 - 2 weeks ago
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  • nonesuchrecords
    08.06.2021 - 2 weeks ago

    Carnegie Hall has announced its 2021–22 concert season, sharing plans to reopen to the general public in October, and among the performers taking the esteemed hall's stages are Sō Percussion with Dawn Upshaw and Gilbert Kalish, and Kronos Quartet; as well as Youssou N'Dour. The season also features works by composers including Caroline Shaw, John Adams, Nico Muhly, Sarah Kirkland Snider, and Michael Gordon. More on all the above here.

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  • prensaescenario2021
    08.06.2021 - 2 weeks ago

    Mariachitlán de Juan Pablo Contreras reabrirá el Walt Disney Concert Hall!

    Mariachitlán de Juan Pablo Contreras reabrirá el Walt Disney Concert Hall!

      Mariachitlán de CONTRERAS reabrirá el Walt Disney Concert Hall! Este verano, luego de más de un año sin música en vivo, Mariachitlán, obra del joven compositor mexicano Juan Pablo Contreras que fue nominada al Latin GRAMMY®, reabrirá el Walt Disney Concert Hall y se escuchará en el Carnegie Hall.   La obra orquestal Mariachitlán, del joven compositor mexicano Juan Pablo Contreras, sigue…

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  • callmedotseurat
    03.06.2021 - 3 weeks ago

    Bernadette Peters, Madeline Kahn, and Glenn Close backstage at Carnegie Hall during the gala benefit, “Sondheim - A Celebration at Carnegie” (June 1992)

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  • whytehousereport
    03.06.2021 - 3 weeks ago

    3-year-old Girl who Learned how to Play Piano in Lockdown Set to Perform at Carnegie Hall

    3-year-old Girl who Learned how to Play Piano in Lockdown Set to Perform at Carnegie Hall

    Brigitte Xie is set to perform at Carnegie Hall. Fox 5 This pint-size piano prodigy is truly note-worthy. (more…)

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  • krispyweiss
    28.05.2021 - 3 weeks ago

    Song Review: Chicago - “Someday (August 29, 1968)” (Live, April 5, 1971)

    Robert Lamm changed the words, Do you know what I mean? to, And it hurts you so bad when Chicago opened their 1971 Carnegie Hall residency with “Someday (August 29, 1968).”

    “I think this is gonna be fun,” Lamm says at song’s end.

    The previously unreleased recording previews the forthcoming (July 16) 16-disc box set Chicago at Carnegie Hall Complete. This is also the track that was fixed - “so no flaws,” trumpeter Lee Loughnane says in the trailer for the massive reissue. And the lead single does sound worked on as compared to the music on the original Carnegie Hall LP, which is raw and deliciously imperfect.

    Written by James Pankow about the infamous 1968 Democratic National Convention in Chicago (the city) and sung by Lamm and Peter Cetera, “Someday” is Chicago (the band) as the politically minded, and collaborative, rock ‘n’ roll group it was at the beginning.

    This version is well-played. But it remains to be heard whether Loughnane and engineer Tim Jessup cleaned up the eight concerts’ worth of music too much for its own good.

    Grade card: Chicago - “Someday (August 29, 1968)” (Live - 4/5/71) - B

    5/28/21

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  • sarahw81
    24.05.2021 - 1 mont ago

    Watch "The Garland Gab" on YouTube

    Our content is increasing and we have so many wonderful podcasts up our sleeve still to come. Please subscribe to join us on this fabulous Judy journey.

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  • oconnormusicstudio
    19.05.2021 - 1 mont ago

    May 19: Today’s Music History

    May 19: Today’s Music History

    • 1616 ~Johann Jakob Froberger, composer • 1861 ~ Dame Nellie Melba (Helen Porter Mitchell), Australian coloratura soprano. She gave her name to Melba Toast, Peach Melba and Melba Sauce. More information about Melba • 1895 ~ Albert Hay Malotte, composer • 1919 ~ Georgie Auld (John Altwerger), Musician: saxophones: bandleader; passed away in 1990 • 1921 ~ The first opera presented in its entirety…

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  • howwelldoyouknowyourmoon
    13.05.2021 - 1 mont ago

    Sister raped and murdered in 1972. And a European sister was raped during the 1973 Carnegie Hall campaign.

    Dr Joseph Sheftick: Then I heard that the sister whom we had witnessed to on the bus team had been raped and murdered [in 1972]. Father said she was an offering and would go to a good place in the spiritual world.

    ‘40 years in America’ book, page 44

    ____________________________________

    Hisako Watanabe: When I came to the United States, Father spoke to Mr. Kamiyama and he organized a team to go out and sell tickets for the Carnegie Hall speech—the tickets were about $2. We were a group of international brothers and sisters. A European sister was raped then [September 1973]. Sometimes it was dangerous. Sometimes people said, “Come to my apartment.” I knew it was dangerous to go with them, so I didn’t.

    We had a holy ground in Central Park. Mr. Kamiyama gathered us there, and we reported every day. We sang and gave testimonies. We sold a lot of tickets and we had a lot of hope. But very few people came. Like the Bible, the guests were invited to the wedding but they didn’t come. Mr. Kamiyama said to us, “Go outside and get people to come in. Get anyone and tell them it’s free. Don’t sell any more tickets.” Anyone who was walking by we brought in. So then all the members came inside and took seats. We were so sorry to Father that we couldn’t bring people. This was our first opportunity to bring people, but it didn’t work. We had a good feeling, but the reality was so miserable. One old lady stood up and spoke up negatively. It was so intense.

    ‘40 years in America’ book, page 96

    ____________________________________

    Dan Fefferman reviews the book:

    40 Years in America—an Honest Appraisal of the Life of the Unification Movement (PDF)

    The recently released 40 Years in America: An Intimate History of the Unification Movement is an important book for several reasons. First, although size doesn’t count in all things, this is a big, gorgeous book, comprising 602 pages and including an impressive array of photographs from the early days of the US movement to the present day. Second, it is indeed an “intimate history” that presents not only the grand actions of its messianic leader but also the trials, tribulations, victories, and reflections of its rank and file members. Third, and for me most important, it is also a self-reflective book with a refreshingly honest approach to the challenges that US Unification movement has faced so far and will face in the future. Credit for this impressive project goes to editor Mike Inglis for conceiving and coordinating it, to church historian Mike Mickler for the painstakingly researched and thought-provoking history that meanders through its oversized pages, and to designer Jonathan Gullery for making what could be a dry historical treatise an absolute delight to the eyes and heart.

    ... But one also reads of stagnation in membership growth, an American movement of an increasingly oriental character, division and disillusionment over the Zimbabwean Heung Jin episode, the bombshell effect of Nansook Hong’s book, and a movement facing demoralization even as its leaders proclaim victory after victory. Mickler’s analysis is too far reaching to deal with in depth here. Let me touch briefly on two aspects that I felt were particularly interesting. The first has to do with what went wrong with the movement in the 1970s. The second deals with where we stand as we look toward the future. As most long-time members recognize, the American Unification movement experienced substantial and rapid growth in the early 1970s, virtually doubling in membership every year from 1970-1974. Mickler offers an intriguing thought as to the nature of the brick wall we hit after that. He sees the experimental Barrytown training project in 1975 as symptomatic of a departure from the American tradition that had previously brought such success. He cites four factors: 1) the sharpening of in-out distinctions between the movement and world 2) an extreme emphasis on fallen nature and obedience to central figures 3) a counterproductive shift away from center life and toward individual pioneering by young members and 4) the creation of an unattractive sense of desperation that failed to bring about the hoped for Pentecost. But Barrytown was only one symptom of a larger problem. “To a large extent,” says Mickler, “Barrytown was a Japanese import... The Japanese outlook and modes of operation became even more pervasive in the church’s mobile fundraising teams.” The result was a new church culture. College-aged Americans took on a soldier-like demeanor that had little appeal to their peers. They wore ties while witnessing, spoke urgently of the dangers of Communism, testified less frequently to the joys of their international community, stopped singing popular songs in favor or oriental Holy Songs, and sometimes even spoke in stilted English with a Japanese accent. The American movement may only now be fully recovering from that cultural shift. Even as we create new federations, hold successful meetings, develop high level contacts, build media empires, and establish internal institutions for spiritual renewal, the fact remains that American Unificationism seems incapable of recreating the magic that enables new members to join. As he looks to the future, Mickler sees a movement potentially divided among four alternative approaches to its apparent failures: 1) those who critique the orientalization of American Unificationism and call for a stronger sense of continuity with American culture 2) those who see the problem in terms of lack of faith and seek spiritual renewal through programs such as Cheongpyeong 3) those who call for a renewal of a communitarian approach in which center life and other community expressions of the Divine Principle ideal are emphasized and 4) those who see the solution in terms of a realization of “elder-sonship,” agreeing that we need greater continuity with American culture but presenting this as a natural evolution rather than a criticism of the past. Of course, these categories are not hard and fast, nor are they mutually exclusive. And this only part of the story, about 20 pages out of a 600 page book. Mickler concludes on a hopeful note, looking to the future and the emergence of Hyun Jin Moon as the heir apparent to True Father who can realize the principle of elder-sonship. Mike Mickler is to be commended not only for a stimulating essay, but also for memorializing a tremendous amount of detailed history in what I found to be a highly readable narrative. Yet even if one never gets around to a thorough reading Mickler’s history, 40 Years in America is guaranteed to give readers many hours of enjoyment, reveling in past victories, mourning fallen soldiers who have come and gone, and pondering what the future will hold for our children and grandchildren. ...

    _____________________________________

    Nansook Hong, transcripts of three interviews, including ‘60 Minutes’

    Nansook Hong In The Shadow Of The Moons

    Black Heung Jin Nim – Violence in the Moon church

    Christiane Coste was raped, stabbed repeatedly, mostly to the face and neck, and strangled in New York on February 24, 1978 while delivering The News World to her area in Harlem.

    Jin-joo Byrne was raped and murdered in August 2002. 
She was just 18. She was fundraising on her own with costume jewellery in Charlotte, NC. Some time later it was arranged for Hak Ja Han, on a visit to Seattle, to meet the family. She was not very sympathetic. A Korean person understood what Hak Ja Han said.


    The Purity Knife – Jen Kiaba

    Hiromi Kazuni disappeared, and was likely killed, while fundraising.

    Montreal girl (probably Ruthie) killed while fundraising for the Unification Church in 1977. She was hit by a car.

    https://www.tparents.org/library/unification/books/40years/

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  • oconnormusicstudio
    09.05.2021 - 1 mont ago

    May 9: Today’s Music History

    May 9: Today’s Music History

    Happy Mother’s Day! • 1707 ~ Dietrich Buxtehude, German organist/composer, died at about the age of 69 • 1740 ~ Giovanni Paisiello, Italian composer (Barber of Seville) • 1880 ~ Johann Hermann Berens, composer, died at the age of 54 • 1905 ~ Ernst Pauer, Austrian composer and pianist, died at the age of 78 • 1914 ~ Carlo Maria Guilini, Italian conductor • 1914 ~ Hank Snow (Clarence Eugene),…

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  • rastronomicals
    05.05.2021 - 1 mont ago

    4:20 PM EDT May 5, 2021:

    Stan Getz, João Gilberto, Astrud Gilberto -   "Garota De Ipanema (The Girl From Ipanema)" From the album   Getz/Gilberto # 2 - Live at Carnegie Hall (April 1966)

    Last song scrobbled from iTunes at Last.fm

    File under: New Trend

    #Stan Getz João Gilberto Astrud Gilberto #Getz/Gilberto 2 - Live at Carnegie Hall #Garota De Ipanema (The Girl From Ipanema)
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  • rabbitcruiser
    05.05.2021 - 1 mont ago

    The Music Hall in New York City (later known as Carnegie Hall) has its grand opening and first public performance, with Tchaikovsky as the guest conductor on May 5, 1891.

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