#ancient greece Tumblr posts

  • Aristotle: Non-Greeks, considered to be barbarians, can only live productively as slaves. Barbarians are to be treated like animals and subjected to despotism.

    Alexander the Great: Ok boomer.

    #will this spark controversy? #no doubt #you have to admit he did treat 'barbarians' less harshly than others #not like not killing them #more like at least giving them something back #anyway #Alexander the Great #Aristotle#Politics#Ancient History#Philosophy#Ancient Greece#Ancient Macedonia#Ok boomer
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  • Chapter 4

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    Summary: This is an AU fic inspired by Theseus/Henry Cavill (Immortals 2011) and Greek mythology. (post)

    Pairing: Theseus x OFC

    Word Count: 5.210 words

    Warnings: angst, dark, smut, angry sex

    Rating: Mature (18+) Please, read at your own discretion.

    A/N: This is for you, my angel @wondersofdreaming​. You asked and I delivered. Thank you for being my inspiration.

    Beta Reader: a HUGE THANK YOU to my amazing, generous and super talented beta @wondersofdreaming​​​. Please go read her writings, you won’t regret it!

    Music Inspo: This Is Your Calling- Trevor Morris (Immortals OST 2011)

    Chapter 1 I Chapter  2 I Chapter 3 I Chapter 4

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    Water puddled around his feet, as Theseus stepped out of the bathtub. The remaining droplets on his skin were glistening in the small light of the oil lamps, forming small lines running down his sinews. The servant came quickly to offer him a towel to cover and dry his body. Theseus wrapped the cloth around his waist staring distracted at the floor. The warm water hadn’t done much to relax his tensed muscles.

    Keep reading

    #henry cavill#immortals#theseus fanfic #theseus x ariadne #theseus x ofc #greek mythology #greek myth retellings #ancient greece#ancient athens#aegeus#medea#phryne #henry cavill fanfiction #henry cavill fanfic #thread of destiny #henry cavill smut #henry cavill angst #henry cavill angry sex #theseus smut#theseus angst #theseus angry sex #radas tales #radas fic rec #radaofrivia#cavillry
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  • Friend: Omfg I can’t believe I have all these equations to revise

    Me, a classics student: Damnnn well don’t mind me *is burning thigh meat*

    Friend: Ughhh.. what are you doing?

    Me, a classics student: Revising

    Friend: Revising how to cook?..

    Me, a classics student: No revising how to sacrifice to Athena so she can do me a solid and help me pass this exam

    Friend: ….

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  • On why Diotima of Mantinea (Socrates’ teacher) deserves more credit than she’s given and how Plato said Achilles was the bottom (among other things about The Symposium, by Plato)

    (I give prove about the Achilles thing in the end. Stan Diotima.)


    •Platonic love, originated from Diotima’s ideas discussed in The Symposium:

    Just saw a post on Instagram about how Plato said that you should date someone who’s better than you in something because love is admiration and they can help you grow, a simplification of the original concept of Platonic Love. In The Symposium, Plato writes down what other philosophers think about Love (you know, all that stuff Aristophanes says about lovers being two sides of the same person divided by Zeus; and also Pausanias who, in the middle of a really sexist and messed up speech I would not recommend reading, makes half of a point saying that in a relationship there should be a young beloved who wants to be virtuous and a virtuous lover who’s able to teach him. Tho Plato’s version in which they have similar ages and complete each other is way better than this one so just ignore Pausanias) well all I can think about reading posts like this now is:

    1) Half the time we say Plato said something it’s because it’s in a book written by him. But most of his books are just him writing down the things Socrates and his dudebros said while drinking wine and gossiping (they all get wasted in the end of that book).

    2) Y'all remember Diotima? Diotima of Mantinea? Socrates’ master? Yeah well everything Socrates and half the things Plato said she said before and better.

    3) In this case, that post is simplifying the definition of platonic love, but the original ideas Plato used to originate this concept are Diotima’s ideas.

    For example, in this post I’m talking about, it says that your lover should have the qualities you lack. Diotima was the one who told Socrates about the balanced nature of Love, not being good or evil, fine or foul, ignorant or wise, but something in between that’s endlessly longing for good and beautiful things. And then this knowledge came, through Socrates, to Plato, during the events of The Symposium.


    •Extracts from The Symposium, when Socrates explains what his master told him about Love:

    Diotima said (and the one who answers her questions is a young Socrates) – “and you hear people say that lovers are seeking for their other half; but I say that they are seeking neither for the half of themselves, nor for the whole, unless the half or the whole be also a good. And they will cut off their own hands and feet and cast them away, if they are evil; for they love not what is their own, unless perchance there be some one who calls what belongs to him the good, and what belongs to another the evil. For there is nothing which men love but the good. Is there anything?” “Certainly, I should say, that there is nothing.” “Then,” she said, “the simple truth is, that men love the good.” “Yes,” I said. “To which must be added that they love the possession of the good? "Yes, that must be added.” “And not only the possession, but the everlasting possession of the good?” “That must be added too.” “Then love,” she said, “may be described generally as the love of the everlasting possession of the good?” “That is most true." 

    And with this she slapped Aristophanes in the face but that’s a whole other topic, here I’m just illustrating what a genius mind this woman had.

    Also next time a teacher asks you anything, answer like Socrates did Diotima: "Nay, Diotima, if I had known, I should not have wondered at your wisdom, neither should I have come to learn from you about this very matter.”

    After all he’s the I know that I know nothing guy.

    She also said– “For love, Socrates, is not, as you imagine, the love of the beautiful only.” “What then?” “The love of generation and of birth in beauty.” “Yes,” I said. “Yes, indeed,” she replied. “But why of generation?” “Because to the mortal creature, generation is a sort of eternity and immortality,” she replied; “and if, as has been already admitted, love is of the everlasting possession of the good, all men will necessarily desire immortality together with good: Wherefore love is of immortality." 

    The secret history vibes.

    "If you believe that love is of the immortal, on the same principle the mortal nature is seeking as far as is possible to be everlasting and immortal: and this is only to be attained by generation, because generation always leaves behind a new existence in the place of the old. […] For what is implied in the word ‘recollection,’ but the departure of knowledge, which is ever being forgotten, and is renewed and preserved by recollection, and appears to be the same although in reality new, according to that law of succession by which all mortal things are preserved, not absolutely the same, but by substitution, the old worn-out mortality leaving another new and similar existence behind unlike the divine, which is always the same and not another? And in this way, Socrates, the mortal body, or mortal anything, partakes of immortality; but the immortal in another way. Marvel not then at the love which all men have of their offspring; for that universal love and interest is for the sake of immortality." 

    Holy shit that woman.

    Ok this is turning into a Diotima stan shitpost real quick so let me just

    •state my point:

    1) Plato was smart, and high-key classist and elitist, and low-key sexist, and really really high-key xenophobic, so as always, take everything these ancient smartasses say with a grain of salt.

    2) The Symposium not only has a bunch of dudebros talking about love, we have a parenthesis in which Plato clarifies that Achilles was the bottom (beloved) and that’s information you all need to have.

    3) If you were to read The Symposium, I’d recommend reading only that part about Achilles which I’ll leave at the end of this post, and what Socrates and Diotima say. And as a plus you could go to the very end and read how Socrates’ boyfriend Alcibiades roasts him, compares him to a satyr, and then says his words always had and still have a great influence in him so he wouldn’t want him dead (peak romance).

    4) If you like ancient philosophy do yourself a favor and read about Diotima. Men from this time should’ve just shut up, listen to her, and drink their respect women juice cause the things Pausanias said could have been prevented if they had (like seriously, skip his part, he basically says that man-man soulmates are better than man-woman and woman-woman cause women are stupid, like…….. this is why Darwin was like that huh?)


    And now I bring to you, Achilles was a bottom and a twink:


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    As you can see, they said lover/beloved and not top/bottom and even tho at the time they were like "yeah the younger man who wants to be virtuous and good is the beloved and the older man who’s already virtuous and good is the lover” we needn’t use it that way now! You can totally bring it back if you like it :) It sounds really DA.

    The fact that Plato went out of his way just to clarify this… he literally has 0 opinions about everything else in that book, he’s just writing down what they say, but the second they imply something wrong about his otp he’s like parenthesis you’re wrong close parenthesis.

    I’d do that tbh. Also if you wanna know more about Alcibiades and how he calls Socrates a satyrface but don’t wanna read the book dm me and I’ll send screenshots likely followed by very strong opinions on said screenshots.

    Stan Diotima and have a good day!

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  • Always, from my first remembrance, whether he rode, or walked, or ran, or stood talking in the street, as far as I could see him I knew him apart from all other men; nor was it possible, in the darkest night, to mistake another’s hand for his.

    — Mary Renault, “The Last of the Wine”

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  • My memories are set to a concert of flutes, or clear voices singing; even now sometimes a chord or a descant can make me smell scented oil and bay-leaves, or grass and burning pitch, and torchlight flickers on the stillness of his listening eyes.

    — Mary Renault, “The Last of the Wine”

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    Ancient Greek statue of Nike, goddess of competition and winning. In the Allard Pierson museum in Amsterdam (doing a history project on her!) — 27.09.20

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    The first mortal woman: Pandora

    Created by the gods and given beauty and cunning, Pandora was gifted with a storage jar (later known as a box) as a wedding gift. She opened the jar and released the swarm of evil spirits trapped within that would forever after plague mankind. Only Hope remained behind.

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    Henryk Siemiradzki (1843-1902)

    He was a Polish painter best remembered for his monumental academical art, and he especially depicted scenes from the ancient greek-roman world


    for more on instagram: arktoi.a

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  • Family member: So what did you learn about at school today?

    Me,a classics student: Oh y’know the usual, gods turning themselves into weird shit to get some ass, assassination and human sacrifice.

    Family member:

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  • So, on the one hand, it’s important to recognise that the Olympian pantheon as we know it is, in large part, an invention of artists and philosophers, and there’s strong evidence that it bears very little resemblance to what ancient Greek religion looked like in practice.

    On the other hand, The Drama.

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    historical hairstyles/headwear

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  • Olive Pickin’

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  • What came first: the chicken or the egg?

    Forget the chicken and the egg. Both are somethings. How do somethings come from nothing at all?!

    To formularise something we should account for nothing. However, one may suppose, as Parmenides did, that even to describe nothing (e.g. in notions such as emptiness, vacuity, and possible worlds) is to declare something about existence (i.e. somethingness).

    While Parmenides et al considered it self-defeating to talk of nothing, Greek ‘atomists’, such as Democritus, in contrast, welcomed talk of the void. In fact, they claimed there are ‘only atoms and the void’, whereby atoms are compositions of the void itself, ruled by ideal laws. In this ontology the void is (existent). But, then, aren’t we back at the start?

    Alain Badiou used Plato’s dream metaphor to claim something is logically tied to nothing without claiming there is a void (the void is not). Dreams are constructed in sleep. Sleep stops; the dream stops. But no matter how closely we look at dreams’ narratives we see multiplicity: an enormous story which actually grows in size the more we inspect its physical origins, without limit or origin.

    How are dreams (something) ontologically grounded in sleep (nothing)? Using set theory, Badiou explains how events are sutured to themselves under one narrative.

    As soon as we grasp the entirety of the dream in a thinkable, ontological structure, the connection to sleep is shattered by discursive, wakeful thought.

    In this way nothing always mediates a situation, ensuring events are consistent with themselves and traces to it are erased in presentation. Nothing is not: a non-being which sits below what is presented under an ‘ungraspable horizon’—a total, unprovable absence which is always necessary to avoid a ‘chicken or the egg’ situation about existence.

    ‘The absolutely primary theme of ontology is the void … [What presents] in-consists with nothing without any foundational stopping point.’

    Is this mathematical magic?

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    I feel like Dolce&Gabbana fashion shows in ancient places would be my emotional support for a long time.

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  • Rosamund Pike as Andromeda, Wrath of the Titans (2012)

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  • I had not the folly to measure his grief by mine, the scar of a meteor’s passage, printed on the sky by brightness and the act of flight.

    — Mary Renault, “The Last of the Wine”

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