#biomedicine Tumblr posts

  • poetic-storm
    17.05.2021 - 4 hours ago

    So my question is, do I want to find a better way to treat mental health issues without the use of drugs, find a new and more effective treatment for cancer, or create better man made environments for astronauts to minimize the longterm effects of space on their bodies?

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  • britishbiomedicine
    17.05.2021 - 13 hours ago
    #British BioMedicine Institute Evidence Skill eLearning Platform BritishCancerInstitute AIIMSDelhi AIIMSRishikesh bbminstitute bbmclinicaltri
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  • bae-cold
    17.05.2021 - 14 hours ago

    Biopharmaceutical and Biomedicine Market Forecast Opportunity Analysis - 2025

    Global Biopharmaceutical and Biomedicine Market, By Product Type (Biopharmaceutical, Nanomedicine, Gene Therapy, Bioinformatics, and Molecular Enzymes & Kits), By Application (Therapeutics, Diagnostics, and Research and Development) and by Region (North America, Latin America, Europe, Asia Pacific, the Middle East, and Africa) was valued at US$ 358.4 Bn in 2016 and is projected to exhibit a CAGR of 9.4% over the forecast period (2017–2025). Frequent launches and approvals of novel biopharmaceutical products is expected to drive the market growth in the near future. In 2017, Sanofi S.A. received U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval for Dupixent (dupilumab) injection to treat adults suffering from moderate to severe eczema (atopic dermatitis). In 2017, F. Hoffmann-La Roche AG received FDA approval for Hemlibra (emicizumab-kxwh), indicated to prevent and reduce bleeding incidents among children and adults suffering from haemophilia A with factor VIII inhibitors. In 2017, Novo Nordisk A/S received the U.S. FDA approval for REBINYN (Coagulation Factor IX (Recombinant), GlycoPEGylated) indicated for treatment and control of bleeding episodes, and perioperative management of bleeding among children and adults. In 2017, Novo Nordisk received U.S. FDA approval for Fiasp (Insulin aspart injection). Fiasp is a fast acting mealtime insulin, which is indicated to improve glycemic control among adults suffering from type 1 and type 2 diabetes. In 2017, Serum Institute of India launched its Rabishield, a rabies monoclonal antibody, developed in partnership with the University of Massachusetts Medical School. In 2017, Mundipharma GmbH launched its Truxima (rituximab), a biosimilar monoclonal antibody for the treatment of cancer, in the UK, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Belgium, Republic of Ireland, and Luxembourg, following authorization by the European Medicines Agency (EMA). The launches and approvals of such novel biopharmaceutical and biomedicine technologies is expected to create a conducive environment for growth of the global biopharmaceutical and biomedicine market.

    * The sample copy includes: Report Summary, Table of Contents, Segmentation, Competitive Landscape, Report Structure, Methodology.

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    Browse 45 Market Data Tables and 42 Figures spread through 285 Pages and in-depth TOC on Biopharmaceutical and Biomedicine Market By Product Type (Biopharmaceutical, Nano medicine, Gene Therapy, Bioinformatics, and Molecular Enzymes & Kits Market) and Region (North America, Latin America, Europe, Asia Pacific, the Middle East, and Africa) - Global Forecast to 2025

    Strategic collaboration of key players and research institutes in the market for the development of biopharmaceutical and biomedicine technologies is also expected to positively affect the market growth. For instance, in February 2018, AbbVie Inc. and Voyager Therapeutics, Inc. entered into a strategic partnership for the development and commercialization of gene therapies for Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative diseases. In February 2018, Kite Pharma, Inc., a Gilead Sciences, Inc. company, collaborated with Sangamo Therapeutics Inc. for developing engineered cell therapies to treat cancer. As per the agreement, Kite Pharma, Inc. will use Sangamo Therapeutics’ zinc finger nuclease (ZFN) gene-editing product type for developing next-generation ex vivo cell therapies for treatment of cancer. In 2017, The National Institutes of Health collaborated with 11 leading biopharmaceutical companies to boost the development of new cancer immunotherapy. The partners include AbbVie Inc., Amgen Inc., Boehringer Ingelheim Pharma GmbH & Co. KG, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Celgene Corporation, Genentech Inc., subsidiary of Roche Group, Gilead Sciences, Inc., GlaxoSmithKline Plc., Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson, Novartis A.G., and Pfizer, Inc. In 2017, AbCellera Biologics, Inc. collaborated with GlaxoSmithKline plc. for the discovery of monoclonal antibodies against an undisclosed membrane protein target.

    Browse Research Report: https://www.coherentmarketinsights.com/market-insight/bio-pharmaceuticals-and-biomedicine-market-18

    Key Takeaways of the Biopharmaceutical and Biomedicine Market:

    The global biopharmaceutical and biomedicine market is expected to exhibit a CAGR of 9.4% over the forecast period (2017–2025), owing to increasing development of novel technologies and strategic collaboration of key players in the market for biopharmaceutical and biomedicine technologies

    North America was the dominant region in the global biopharmaceutical and biomedicine market and is expected to retain its dominance over the forecast period (2017–2025). This is due to presence of major key players and increasing funding by various organizations to support biopharmaceutical researches. For instance, in 2015, National Institutes of Health (NIH) funded US$ 54 million to support emerging challenges in biomedical research. NIH has funded to launch four broad scientific Program: the Glycoscience Program, the 4D Nucleome Program, the Gabriella Miller Kids First Research Program, and the Science of Behavior Change Program.

    Asia Pacific is expected to exhibit highest growth, with a CAGR of 15.3% over the forecast period, due to increasing research and development in China in biopharmaceutical and biomedicine. For instance, in 2016, Chinese scientists injected cells modified with the CRISPR-Cas9 gene-editing technology in human. This is the first time in world when researchers from the Sichuan University in Chengdu inserted re-engineered cells into a lung cancer patient participating in a clinical trial at the West China Hospital.

    Major players operating in the biopharmaceutical and biomedicine market include Amgen Inc., F. Hoffmann-La Roche AG, Novartis AG, Johnson & Johnson, Pfizer, Inc., Sanofi S.A., Eli Lilly and Company, AbbVie Inc., Novo Nordisk A/S, Bristol - Myers Squibb, NanoString Technologies, Inc., Qiagen N.V., Celgene Corporation, and Affimed N.V.

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    #Biopharmaceutical and Biomedicine Market Analysis #Biopharmaceutical and Biomedicine Market
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  • chetanare
    17.05.2021 - 15 hours ago

    Soybean Polysaccharides Market 2021 – Key Factors and Emerging Opportunities with Current Trends Analysis 2027

    Soybean Polysaccharides Market 2021 – Key Factors and Emerging Opportunities with Current Trends Analysis 2027

    KandJMarketResearch.com add new report on “Global Soybean Polysaccharides Market” covered new research with Covid-19 Outbreak Impact details. Market Report Overview The demand for the Soybean Polysaccharides market is rising globally due to its efficacy and extensive consumption by the general public. The report puts a prime focus on market growth and the reputation that helps in generating…

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  • bpod-mrc
    17.05.2021 - 16 hours ago

    Signs of Stress

    In a moment of stress, you might send a panicked text message to a far-off friend. Whether it’s a cry for help or word of warning, similar long-distance camaraderie exists between disparate parts of your body as well. Stressed cells release many molecular messages to neighbours. Researchers examined such signals sent by skeletal muscles all the way to the brain, and found they relied on a particular protein, an enzyme called amyrel, and the sugary molecules it produces. These signals prevented the buildup of misfolded proteins in the brain and eye of fruit fly subjects (pictured, the retina on the right free of yellow and red protein debris after receiving the signals). Muscle stress responses appear to provide a protective service to the brain, in a process that maintains health and staves off neurodegenerative conditions like Alzheimer’s disease. Perhaps enhancing this signal could ultimately help the brain keep threats at arm’s length.

    Written by Anthony Lewis

    Image from work by Mamta Rai and colleagues

    Department of Developmental Neurobiology, St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN, USA

    Image copyright held by the original authors

    Research published in Cell Metabolism, March 2021

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  • biomedivine
    16.05.2021 - 1 day ago

    Everything about MEIOSIS

    New article!

    All the details about #Meiosis, just as announced!

    Check it out here.

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  • britishbiomedicine
    16.05.2021 - 1 day ago
    #British BioMedicine Institute Evidence Skill eLearning Platform BritishCancerInstitute AIIMSDelhi AIIMSRishikesh bbminstitute bbmclinicaltri
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  • bpod-mrc
    16.05.2021 - 1 day ago

    Baby Gap

    Life is full of give and take – cells and tissues exchange chemicals with each other, often pushing them through tiny channels in cell membranes. There is another way though, making use of the gaps where cells meet in the epithelium – the skin-like barrier that coats many of our tissues – but what controls this paracellular transport is a little mysterious. Here a mesh of epithelial cells (purple) nestles a developing egg cell in a fruit fly ovary. Pictured under a confocal fluorescence microscope, the cells form triangular junctions that expand or contract to create temporary intercellular spaces (green), long enough for yolk-forming proteins to squeeze through to the egg. With a similar mechanism helping chemicals move from the blood into mammalian testes, future work may unravel the role of paracellular transport in human fertility and development too.

    Written by John Ankers

    Image from work by Jone Isasti-Sanchez and colleagues

    Institute of Animal Physiology, University of Münster, Münster, Germany

    Image copyright held by the original authors

    Research published in Developmental Cell, April 2021

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  • bpod-mrc
    15.05.2021 - 2 days ago

    Renin Ropes

    Whenever you feel thirsty, that’s the hormone renin at work. It's released by special cells in your kidneys and tells your brain you need to drink something. However, renin-producing cells are also found outside the kidney. What do they do here? Researchers now investigate by studying renin-producing immune cells in the blood called B-1 lymphocytes. These cells were harvested from mice and grown in dishes with E.coli bacteria. Scanning electron microscopy (pictured) revealed that these cells (balls) produced cables of renin, and trapped and engulfed bacteria (cylinders) to control bacterial growth. The team then measured the growth of the bacteria Salmonella with or without B-1 lymphocytes. Bacterial growth was reduced when B-1 lymphocytes were present. Finally, they grew Salmonella with B-1 lymphocytes from mutant mice lacking renin – bacterial growth wasn’t reduced as much as with normal B-1 lymphocytes. Renin production, therefore, helps B-1 lymphocytes fight off infections.

    Written by Lux Fatimathas

    Image from work by Brian C. Belyea and colleagues

    Department of Pediatrics, Child Health Research Center, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, VA, USA

    Image originally published with a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)

    Published in Scientific Reports, March 2021

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  • bpod-mrc
    14.05.2021 - 3 days ago

    Networks for Movement

    Nestled deep within the brain is the basal ganglia, a cluster of neurons that controls various behaviours including how we move our limbs. Damage to these neurons and their networks can lead to conditions that affect our ability to make controlled movements, such as Parkinson’s disease. To better understand how information travels from the basal ganglia to the various brain regions involved in movement and behaviour, scientists created a precise map in mice of the networks originating from an area of the basal ganglia called the substantia nigra. They tracked electrical signals leaving from substantia nigra neurons as they travelled along pathways called axons (in green) to the rest of the brain by forming connections (in red) with other neurons. The detailed networks this map revealed could be used by other researchers to understand what type of information is carried along each connection and, ultimately, how animals move.

    Written by Gaëlle Coullon

    Image from work by Lauren E. McElvain et al, David Kleinfeld lab, UC San Diego

    Department of Physics, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USA

    Image copyright held by the original authors

    Research published in Neuron, April 2021

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  • bpod-mrc
    13.05.2021 - 4 days ago

    A Clear Mind

    Brain surgery is, as you might expect, difficult. Brain scans – images that reveal the structures inside our skulls – have been used to pinpoint problems and plan surgery for decades, but flat, monochromatic images can only tell you so much. 3D printing technology allows a different type of visualisation, and a new study has examined the production process to test whether patient-specific models can be rapidly produced to better prepare surgeons. The study produced transparent models, with key anatomical features coloured (pictured, with a tumour shown red alongside other highlighted structures). The models’ soft, brain-like texture let neurosurgeons simulate procedures before taking to the real thing. Printing could be done in four days and proved valuable in ten simulated clinical situations, particularly to surgeons with less experience. This rapid production could be embedded into common practice for neurosurgery, to help make brain surgery a little less daunting.

    Written by Anthony Lewis

    Image from work by Yun-Sik Dho and colleagues

    Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, Republic of Korea

    Image originally published with a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)

    Published in Scientific Reports, March 2021

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  • biomedivine
    13.05.2021 - 4 days ago

    Cell biology definitions (1)

    Next article for the website in progress!

    Felt like sharing some definitions on cell biology.

    MEIOSIS: A type of cell division in which a nucleus divides into four daughter nuclei, each containing half the chromosome number of the parent nucleus.

    A spotlight of the article:

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  • bpod-mrc
    11.05.2021 - 6 days ago

    Pointing Fingers

    The traces we leave behind are fragile – DNA breaks up, blood dries, fingerprints fade. Without the luxury of a portable lab or huge quantities of fresh DNA, forensic scientists often face a compromise between science and sleuthing – preserve a perishing blood sample for hopeful DNA analysis or analyse the patterns that might be left in a fading smear or print. Yet here a cocktail of preserving chemicals react with the dried blood to fluorescently highlight the whorls and ridges of latent blood fingerprints left on aluminium foil (left) and painted wood (right). The polymer mixture, applied with a soaked cotton pad placed on top of a print, may work with prints that are over 600 days old, all the while preserving DNA in the blood, meaning genetic fingerprinting – comparing the sample’s DNA sequences to suspects or victims – may happen alongside more traditional forms of criminology.

    Written by John Ankers

    Image adapted from work by Zhinan Fan and colleagues, in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces 2021

    Department of Polymer Science and Engineering, College of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Soochow University, Suzhou, P. R. China

    Image copyright held by the original authors

    Published in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces, March 2021

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  • lia-morticians-daughter
    09.05.2021 - 1 week ago

    bioinfo

    how to not rip yourself with this bioinformatics project?

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  • biomedivine
    09.05.2021 - 1 week ago

    SINGA scholarships

    09/05/2021

    Hi guys! Today I want to tell you about the SINGA scholarships. I got an answer by one of the people I contacted for a PhD in there, and they adviced me to ask for this funding, so what is it?

    A short explanation:

    The Singapore International Graduate Award (SINGA) is a collaboration between the Agency for Science, Technology & Research (A*STAR), the Nanyang Technological University (NTU), the National University of Singapore (NUS), the Singapore University of Technology and Design (SUTD) and the Singapore Management University (SMU). PhD training will be carried out in English at your chosen lab at A*STAR Research Institutes, NTU, NUS, SUTD or SMU. Students will be supervised by distinguished and world-renowned researchers in these labs. Upon successful completion, students will be conferred a PhD degree by either NTU, NUS, SUTD or SMU.

    I think that the most interesting thing it is the kind of PhD one can purchase, perfect if doing Bioengineering or related sciences, and also the fact that there are a lot of singaporian Universities.

    Their website is on here. Check it out!

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  • bpod-mrc
    09.05.2021 - 1 week ago

    Getting Attached

    The blastocyst is a structure that develops around the early embryo before it implants into the wall of the womb. It's essential for implantation and is formed through a series of cell divisions. This involves cell machinery that controls contractility, including proteins such as actin and myosin. Researchers now investigate subunits of myosin called non-muscle myosin II heavy chains (NHMC). Using mouse embryos they created mutants lacking NMHC II-A or NMHC II-B or both. They find NMHC II-A caused major defects in cell division, reduced maturation of cells and other morphological defects in the embryo. NHMC II-B mutants had less severe defects. Double mutants had the most severe defects with cell division failing completely in most cases. However, all mutants were still able to create fluid-filled vacuoles, which is part of the normal process of readying the blastocyst for implantation. This reveals that some events involved in pre-implantation are unaffected by defects in contractility but also that NMHC II-A is the major player in regulating contractility in preparation for implantation.

    Written by Lux Fatimathas

    Image from work by Markus Frederik Schliffka and Anna Francesca Tortorelli, and colleagues

    Genetics and developmental biology unit, Institut Curie, Paris, France

    Image originally published with a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)

    Published in eLife, April 2021

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  • bpod-mrc
    08.05.2021 - 1 week ago

    Inflammation Detector

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a type of medical imaging technique in which radioactive tracers are introduced into the body to allow doctors to detect and measure physiological processes such as inflammation, blood flow and tumour growth. For inflammation, one of the most commonly used tracers is 18F-FDG (fluorodeoxyglucose), but because this tracer labels a variety of metabolically active cells, it lacks specificity. Now, there’s a new tracer in the works: a radioactive version of a natural molecule – Siglec-9 – that binds the inflammatory protein vascular adhesion protein 1. And, the tracer’s greater specificity means it could be used at lower doses and have improved accuracy. Indeed, the hands of the rheumatoid arthritis patient pictured appear to show brighter signals at the inflamed joints when Siglec-9 was used for PET (top) than when 18F-FDG was used (bottom). Such results in early human testing bode well for the tracer’s continued clinical development.

    Written by Ruth Williams

    Image adapted from work by Riikka Viitanen and colleagues

    Turku PET Centre, University of Turku, Turku, Finland

    Image originally published with a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)

    Published in Journal of Nuclear Medicine, April 2021

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  • bpod-mrc
    07.05.2021 - 1 week ago

    Lateralised Thinking

    While different brain areas are responsible for processing different things, like what we see or feel, they don’t operate independently. The complex cognitive processes that go on in our heads rely on brain regions being interconnected. The inferior parietal lobe (IPL, outlined here in black) is where many such networks converge and plays a crucial role in both low-level processes like attention and high-level processes like emotion and language. By asking volunteers to perform a series of low and high-level tasks while in an MRI scanner, a team of scientists were able to show increases in brain activity (in red-orange) in the left and right side of the IPL depending on whether it was being used in an attention task (top) or to process language (bottom). This shows us how each side of the IPL has specialised roles, and that they work together to coordinate our complex mental capacities.

    Written by Gaëlle Coullon

    Image from work by Ole Numssen, Danilo Bzdok and Gesa Hartwigse

    Lise Meitner Research Group Cognition and Plasticity, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences Leipzig, Germany and the Dept of Biomedical Engineering, McConnell Brain Imaging Centre, Montreal Neurological Institute, McGill University, Canada

    Image originally published with a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)

    Published in eLife, March 2021

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  • bpod-mrc
    06.05.2021 - 1 week ago

    Flipping the Script

    To fight specific threats, the adaptive immune system mounts a sophisticated defence, picking up on pathogens’ markers, or antigens, to set up a targeted response against them. Immune cells known as dendritic cells play an important role here: they display antigens to activate T cells, which then destroy anything they recognise as the same pathogen. Recent research on especially effective T-cell activators, type 1 conventional dendritic cells (cDC1s), found that a protein regulating the expression of other genes, the transcription factor DC-SCRIPT, was essential for their immune performance. cDC1s developing without DC-SCRIPT (highlighted in cDC1s in red, beside T cells in blue) were less able to properly interact with antigens, damaging their effectiveness against disease. As our understanding of dendritic cell development grows, researchers hope to find ways of stimulating the production of larger numbers of functional dendritic cells, to ultimately boost the body’s own defences against viruses or cancer.

    Written by Emmanuelle Briolat

    Image by Shengbo Zhang and Wang Cao, WEHI

    Walter and Eliza Hall Institute (WEHI) of Medical Research, Parkville, VIC, Australia

    Image copyright held by the original authors

    Research published in Science Immunology, April 2021

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