#blm Tumblr posts

  • drag-tween
    20.04.2021 - 16 minutes ago
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  • mariela-popielewska
    20.04.2021 - 1 hour ago
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  • deadtomyheart
    20.04.2021 - 2 hours ago

    english assessment

    for my assessment, we have to do a persuasive speech about racism and rights. I'm so excited to do it.

    everyone deserves to be loved and respected. but right now it's black lives matter as it's always been white lives matter.

    I believe in you guys

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  • kinialohaguy
    20.04.2021 - 2 hours ago

    Kalifornia's Large Mouth (b)Ass

    Kalifornia’s Large Mouth (b)Ass

    Aloha kākou. Mad Maxine Waters is at it again. This time her racist rhetoric might have backfired. Mad Maxine Waters,  is the chair-insect of the powerful House Financial Services Committee. Where she used the office to make herself and family a fortune. The BLM-Maggot insists her comments in Minnesota this past weekend urging people to ratchet up “confrontation” “in the streets” was not a call…

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  • shieldmaiden-of-christ
    20.04.2021 - 3 hours ago

    Sacred Heart Catholic Church is burning down in Minneapolis just blocks away from the blm rioters

    God have mercy

    #catholic#christian#fuck blm#im enraged #sacred heart minneapolis #minneapolis church fire #oh but christians have NEVER been oppressed #this is to close to home
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  • snflwrstudies
    20.04.2021 - 4 hours ago

    04.19.21 | 58/100 days of productivity

    happy monday everyone! just a little preface, posts might be a little scarce this week, as it’s performance week for the musical i’m in, and i’ve been focusing a lot on that at the moment. i felt very happy with how today went as i got a lot done! i designed the set for the play i’m directing, set the date for the performances / auditions, and had a great dress rehearsal for the musical! i also participated in a statewide walkout for racial injustice and i felt so empowered to be apart of it. it was the first time i was able to attend a protest for BLM and i loved every minute of it!

    QOTD: why are you an activist?

    i am an activist for a lot of reasons. for one, i have a lot of privilege as a white person in america, so i know i need to use my platform to stand up for those who do not have the privilege that i have. i’m also a queer woman so although i don’t know what it feels like to be discriminated against for the color of my skin, i do know what it feels like to be hated for who you are. finally, i have POC all around me in my life. i have a black sister, some of my closest friends are POC. i know that i need to be an activist for them because they are some of the most important people in my life. so if it isn’t clear where i stand, let me clarify once and for all:

    black lives matter. stop asian hate. acab.

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  • black-paraphernalia
    20.04.2021 - 4 hours ago

    Here at BLACK PARAPHERNALIA the purpose is to bring stories of black history the good-bad-ugly and all the EVIL of it. If one is going to tell the story it should be in truth, Black history have been lied about and swept under the rug.

    I do not make up any of the stories posted, I only research for the extended learning and understanding for my own edification. I choose to share what I learn only to spark ones intellectual ability to want to research and continue to read and learn for oneself.

    This is done for the further understanding of ones past to understand the present that will enable one to move into their future with an awareness. If we do not we are doom to repeat the past in the worst way possible.

    I am a firm believer that the Black Slavery and American experience for blacks is a HOLOCAST within its own right, it only is a continued loop of atrocities that are heaved upon the Black race from then to now. I will be posting stories that been told of the pure evil that one race have placed upon another.

    I would like to reiterate I do not make the stories I just post what is already been posted. The line of all the stories posted by Black Paraphernalia is source posted and there is no chronological order because what has happen to the Black race is out of order. 

    Introducing a new sect called Pure Evil will be very sensitive subjects with sensitive pictures posted in the best taste possible, It will be in the Keep Reading section. Therefore, you will not have to see or read how evil some people can be. However, if you choose to read on you do so at your own psyche risk because the bell cannot be unrung and the responsibly is now on you.

    If you do read on and do not like what you read or saw- Oh well ! Do not come for me. Just do not come to read my posts, I will not get into a tumblr beef I will block you PDQ.

    As I posted in the disclaimer, I am unapologetic - I will post what I post and say what I say.-because I will always do it in TRUTH and RESPECT.

    Also if you open to HOME page of Black Paraphernalia blog there is music at the bottom of the page for your listening pleasure to enjoy while reading.

    A Story Coming Soon: Florida’s alligator bate

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  • deviantdiscourse
    20.04.2021 - 5 hours ago

    Can someone tell me why YouTube has a content warning on this song about a historical event? Are we worried about white people being offended? Oh, right... I guess we are. The song was banned by radio stations in 30 states. Fuck YouTube for caving into white fragility.

    #gordon lightfoot #black day in July #detroit#1967 #1967 detroit riot #detroit rebellion #know your history #black history#us history #black lives matter #black lives still matter #blm#Youtube
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  • helixx7331
    20.04.2021 - 5 hours ago

    Sure racist cops exist but lets talk about white supremacist nurses and teachers.

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  • aureliawisenri
    20.04.2021 - 5 hours ago

    bought lahabrea an augmented enochlesis 8) 

    #my screenshots #final fantasy xiv #ffxiv#hephaestus argyris #i'd have considered getting the blm one since that's his main but i'm not wild about the blm one #and i like the old world rod i'm using for him pretty well #meanwhile i didn't have a good weapon glamour for scholar still
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  • excalial
    20.04.2021 - 5 hours ago

    wtf

    #blm movement#blm protests#blm2021#blacklivesmatter #black lives matter #white lives matter
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  • thalon3lystoner
    20.04.2021 - 6 hours ago

    🤨💯✔️

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  • black-paraphernalia
    20.04.2021 - 6 hours ago

    WHO WAS PHILLIS WHEATLEY

    I first learned of Mrs. Phillis Wheatey in English Lit 2 in college. She was a Slave and a mother and a wife. However, her story did not just stop there, she tell a story of the most inhumane treatment only one can endure and yet she rose above the ashes that the flames of hatred and insensitivity to a human could ignite. Phillis became a free slave, she tells the story, and her quest for freedom for others. And yes she rose out of the ashes and became the first slave black women to be published in America.

    Phillis Wheatley Peters, (c. 1753 – December 5, 1784) also spelled Phyllis and Wheatly was the first African-American author of a published book of poetry. Born in West Africa, she was sold into slavery at the age of seven or eight and transported to North America. She was enslaved by the Wheatley family of Boston. 

    On arrival in Boston, she was enslaved by John Wheatley, a wealthy Boston merchant and tailor, who bought the young girl as a slave for his wife Susanna. John and Susanna Wheatley named her Phillis, after the ship that had transported her to America. She was given their last name of Wheatley.

    The Wheatleys' 18-year-old daughter, Mary, was Phillis's first tutor in reading and writing. Their son, Nathaniel, also helped her. John Wheatley was known as a progressive throughout New England; his family afforded Phillis an unprecedented education for an enslaved person, and one unusual for a woman of any race. By the age of 12, she was reading Greek and Latin classics in their original languages, as well as difficult passages from the Bible. At the age of 14, she wrote her first poem, "To the University of Cambridge [Harvard], in New England".[11][12] Recognizing her literary ability, the Wheatley family supported Phillis's education and left household labor to their other domestic enslaved workers. The Wheatleys often showed off her abilities to friends and family. Strongly influenced by her readings of the works of Alexander Pope, John Milton, Homer, Horace, and Virgil, Phillis began to write poetry

    Phillis Wheatley wrote a letter to Reverend Samson Occom, commending him on his ideas and beliefs stating that enslaved people should be given their natural-born rights in America. Wheatley also exchanged letters with the British philanthropist John Thornton, who discussed Wheatley and her poetry in correspondence with John Newton. Along with her poetry, she was able to express her thoughts, comments and concerns to others.

    In 1775, she sent a copy of a poem entitled "To His Excellency, George Washington" to the then-military general. The following year, Washington invited Wheatley to visit him at his headquarters in Cambridge, Massachusetts, which she did in March 1776.[20]Thomas Paine republished the poem in the Pennsylvania Gazette in April 1776.[21]

    IIn 1768, Wheatley wrote "To the King's Most Excellent Majesty", in which she praised King George III for repealing the Stamp Act. As the American Revolution gained strength, Wheatley's writing turned to themes that expressed ideas of the rebellious colonists. In 1770 Wheatley wrote a poetic tribute to the evangelist George Whitefield. Her poetry expressed Christian themes, and many poems were dedicated to famous figures. Over one-third consist of elegies, the remainder being on religious, classical, and abstract themes. She seldom referred to her own life in her poems. One example of a poem on slavery is

       "On being brought from Africa to America"

    Twas mercy brought me from my Pagan land, Taught my benighted soul to understand That there's a God, that there's a Saviour too: Once I redemption neither sought nor knew. Some view our sable race with scornful eye, "Their colour is a diabolic dye." Remember, Christians, Negroes, black as Cain, May be refin'd, and join th' angelic train

    Many colonists found it difficult to believe that an African slave was writing "excellent" poetry. Wheatley had to defend her authorship of her poetry in court in 1772. She was examined by a group of Boston luminaries, including John Erving, Reverend Charles Chauncey, John Hancock, Thomas Hutchinson, the governor of Massachusetts, and his lieutenant governor Andrew Oliver. 

    They concluded she had written the poems ascribed to her and signed an attestation, which was included in the preface of her book of collected works: Poems on Various Subjects, Religious and Moral, published in London in 1773. Publishers in Boston had declined to publish it, but her work was of great interest to influential people in London.

    After her book was published, by November 1773, the Wheatleys emancipated Phillis. Her former enslaver Susanna died in the spring of 1774, and John in 1778. Shortly after, Wheatley met and married John Peters, a free black grocer. They lived in poor conditions and two of their babies died.

    John was improvident and was imprisoned for debt in 1784. With a sickly infant son to provide for, Phillis became a scullery maid at a boarding house, work she had not done before. She died on December 5, 1784, at the age of 31.[Her infant son died soon after. (Source from Wikipedia)

    #black paraphenalia #the first black #phillis wheatley#BLM #black poems and poets
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  • your-greekblogger
    20.04.2021 - 6 hours ago

    Keeping faith in system

    Keeping faith in system

    By John Kanelis / johnkanelis_92@hotmail.com Try as I might to understand the anger simmering inside the black community in this nation, I cannot possibly grasp it in its entirety. I am a white man. I haven’t experienced the type of brutality that many of my black friends have endured. With that said, I am left to stipulate that I am inclined to place a good measure of trust in the judicial…

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