#books Tumblr posts

  • #poetry#coffee#books #carlos poças falcão #a nuvem
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  • 17.01.2020

    Bon, je n’ai rien posté ici depuis un moment. J’ai beaucoup travaillé depuis décembre, parce que je n’avais plus cours. J’ai lu beaucoup de livres et trouvé un peu plus de 150 nouvelles oeuvres d’art à intégrer dans le corpus qui formera la base de ma recherche. Mon problème maintenant est que j’ai trop d’oeuvres et pas assez d’artistes, ce qui signifie que mon corpus n’est pas du tout équilibré; ça risque de me poser des problèmes à la rédaction. Je dois chercher dans de véritables archives, au lieu des archives publiées que j’avais consultées jusqu’ici, mais mes cours reprennent lundi.

    Résultat, qui va passer tous ses samedis aux Archives Nationales?

    Enfin, bonne année à tout le monde, étudiez bien et prenez soin de vous <3

    ___

    So, I haven’t posted anything here since a long time. I studied a lot since december, since I didn’t have any class. So I read a lot of books and found more than 150 new works of art I will add to the corpus I will study. My problem now is that I have too many works of art and not enough artists, which means my corpus isn’t balanced at all… Which won’t help me when I actually write something. I need to do some research in real archives, and not published ones like I did until now, but my classes start on Monday.

    So guess who’s going to spend every Saturday in the National Archives?

    Anyway, happy new year everyone, study well and take care :)

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  • #replies #femslash related stuff #sent on 20190904 #*coughs*#Anonymous#books #a memory called empire #arkady martine #mahit x three seagrass
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    I’m having so much fun adding new pretty things to my summer wardrobe. I got this floral blue skirt a while ago and last week I got a top with the exact same color and pattern to match. I’m finishing The Rules Of Magic, re-reading The Raven Cycle and walking by the beach every afternoon. I’m going to miss this.

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    #currently reading #daisy jones and the six #booklr#books
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  • A.A. Milne, born January 18, 1882, was a British author, known for his books about the teddy bear Winnie-the-Pooh and for various poems. Milne was a noted writer, primarily as a playwright, before the huge success of Pooh overshadowed all his previous work. Not only was H.G. Wells one of Milne’s schoolteachers as a boy, but he also played for the amateur English cricket team the Allahakbarries alongside authors J. M. Barrie and Arthur Conan Doyle.


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    #gsbauthorquotes

    #gsbquotesaamilne

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    #gasstationburrito #onthisday #literaryhistory #bookstagram #books #bookworm #author #authorquotes #authormemes #writer #writerquotes #aamilne #winniethepooh #thinkingforyourself #thinking #firstratemind #majority #minority #groupthink #herdmentality #deplorables
    https://www.instagram.com/p/B7ekYbehNT1/?igshid=q38f6jx33xtm

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  • how to love a dark academic:

    • write them letters and seal the envelopes with fancy wax seals

    • buy them books

    • write them poetry

    • quote shakespeare, or really any other author or playwright to them

    • read and discuss books with them

    • listen to their 3 am rants on how we could’ve heard oscar wilde’s voice if he’d had lived just a tad longer

    • help them study

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    Admont Abbey Library, Austria

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    Finally finished It, absolutely amazing . Studied for biology and wrote an essay.

    4/100 days of productivity

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    Title: Some Prefer Nettles | Author: Junichiro Tanizaki | Publisher: Vintage Classics (2001)

    #books #Some Prefer Nettles #Junichiro Tanizaki
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  • Józef Czapski’s room, Pawilon Józefa Czapskiego, Kraków

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  • “People could push and pull at you, and poke you, and probe as deep as they could go. They could even tear you apart, bit by bit. But at the heart and root and soul of you, something would remain untouched.”

    - Lauren Oliver, Liesl & Po

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  • hate when you’re reading a sub-to-low-par book and you pick a favorite side character that you end up writing a ton of fan fiction in your head about that’s much better than the actual book you’re reading and you accidentally make that side character a lot more interesting than they are in the book so you end up being disappointed by what the author actually does with that character because you KNOW they had a lot more potential to be so much cooler.

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  • I have a stack of books to read but no by all means let’s go buy more.

    So I picked up a few new ones! My goal this year is to read 30 novels (which doesn’t sound like a lot, but it’s a lot of focusing for me!) I’m currently working through Carry On, also by Rainbow Rowell, so that’ll be #1 for 2020. I guess these five will follow!

    Most excited for: Wayward Son, I am loving Carry On so far.

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    Amanda Hocking’s “Freeks” is not the kind of book I would normally choose for myself at this point in my life. Perhaps in high school or university I would have been drawn to the red-accented, high-contrast black and white cover art, but supernatural themes and cover designs have long been ruined for me thanks to their propensity in the mid aughts.

    That said, the carnival setting and trope of circus performers with actual supernatural powers is a familiar one, though not exhausted. Written from the first-person perspective of 19-year-old Mara, we are walked through introductions of a tight-knit cast, whose powers are introduced in a way that clarifies the characters are comfortable and welcome within the confines of the carnival, but knowing and wary of normies who may threaten or harm them because of their differences.

    The concern (not fear, refreshingly) is evident and justified, and Hocking demonstrates her writing prowess cleanly by following the show-don’t-tell rule that can sometimes evade less-experienced writers. Though the plot drags at times - I have little patience these days for mysterious secrets, nor do I care much for romantic subplots - it is overall well-written, with enough mystery and fear to keep the reader pushing forward to find out what is haunting and hunting the circus ground.

    I don’t really have any complaints about the story itself. To an informed reader, the hints dropped along the way (Mara’s vague middle-eastern heritage, the setting of the story being on old Choctaw territory, consistent use of tarot cards) may allow them to figure everything out relatively easily. For those unfamiliar with such things, they set up the story well and allow major reveals to feel well-timed, rather than surprising. In fact, with so many elements at play, it is easier and more enjoyable to let the author do her job and just be taken along for the ride.

    As an aside, Hocking is the first American author I’ve read this year, and while it may simply be her style, the frequency of first-person pronouns was a bit distracting from the tone of the book, especially through the prologue and first few chapters. From the prologue:

    I didn’t scream - there was no one who could come to help me, nothing that could stop the monster that lurched behind me.

    Personally, simply cutting the word “me” from this sentence would improve the atmosphere of the prologue and better set the tone of the book. From a cultural standpoint, I’m vaguely interested to find out whether this is a tendency of American young adult fiction or simply an author quirk.

    Speaking of culture, one thing I hadn’t realized is how much familiarity plays a role in how easy a story is to enjoy. Though I’ve never been to Louisiana myself, Caudry is a small town not too far removed from the one I myself grew up in. Certain characters seem a little unbelievable at times because of this (I’m looking at you, Deputy Bob) but that may be more because my perspective is more inside-out.

    Similarly, I often take for granted relationships and character dynamics. It’s nothing I can enunciate just yet, but the way even family interacts in the UK versus US seems different, and as an American myself, it’s easier to read between the lines of those relationships and interactions to understand what is happening in full. A lack of familiarity with English relationships means having to work harder to understand nuances that may be more easily understood by those who have lived it, which may also play a role in my understanding of the book as a whole. Perhaps the more I read, the easier this will get - and if not, it might be time to give Kate Fox’s “Watching the English” another shot.

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    Booklist called Mika Song’s and my new picture book a “lovely, funny, tender story” that “exhibits incredibly clever storytelling,” and here is an actual photo of my reaction. (Okay, not really—it’s a favorite detail from one of Mika’s wonderful LOVE, SOPHIA ON THE MOON illustrations.)

    Here’s the full Booklist review:

    “Sophia is running away to live on the moon (i.e., under the kitchen table), where there are no time-outs and no one yells if she breaks something. She’s taken Mr. Wubbles the cat and won’t come back, no matter what. Sure, her mom may try to tempt her with letters about the cookies and spaghetti and bedtime stories she’s missing, but Sophia’s too busy riding moonicorns and drinking starlight soup and asteroid tea. Although, maybe by bedtime she misses her mom just a tad. This lovely, funny, tender story exhibits incredibly clever storytelling, starting on the illustrated title page. Told through handwritten letters between Sophia and her mother, and supported by Song’s watercolors in comforting nighttime purples and blues, this tale allows for both imagination and speculation as the story progresses. It’s terrific for representation of both cultural and family diversity, and it has excellent altruistic and guilt-free messaging about how a parent can get upset with a child but still love them—quite literally—to the moon and back. –Becca Worthington”

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