#china Tumblr posts

  • asian-guys-paradise
    17.04.2021 - 48 minutes ago

    young

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  • oniyoji
    17.04.2021 - 50 minutes ago

    North Face of Mt. Everest

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  • thrownblown
    17.04.2021 - 50 minutes ago

    Longsheng Rice Terraces, China

    #Longsheng Rice Terraces #China
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  • wdbm
    17.04.2021 - 50 minutes ago

    Helping Hands, China

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  • arlenareed
    17.04.2021 - 50 minutes ago

    201220 Yibo - Tencent Video All Star Night 2020 HD

    © Kick9Starter • Do not edit

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  • traeagervais
    17.04.2021 - 52 minutes ago

    🥰❤️🖤💛🌎🦉😝

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  • fuckyeahchinesefashion
    17.04.2021 - 1 hour ago

    陈钰琪 chen yuqi as liuying鎏英 in chinese costume drama ashes of love

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  • arlenareed
    17.04.2021 - 1 hour ago

    180906 Yibo - Tiffany & Co. Paper Flowers brand event HD

    © FLUOXETINE • Do not edit

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  • asian-guys-paradise
    17.04.2021 - 1 hour ago

    young

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  • hanfugallery
    17.04.2021 - 1 hour ago

    chinese hanfu by 花朝记

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  • chris-jumbo
    17.04.2021 - 1 hour ago

    Zhong Chuxi for a Weltmeister auto brand event

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  • crazyfanofmassculture
    17.04.2021 - 1 hour ago

    «We got married. China»

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  • arlenareed
    17.04.2021 - 2 hours ago

    191110 Yibo - Double Eleven Party HD

    © 邮吻 • Do not edit

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  • umfilmibom
    17.04.2021 - 2 hours ago

    Picnic en la ruta

    路边野餐

    Bi Gan

    China

    2015

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  • unknownlord
    17.04.2021 - 2 hours ago

    My boss doesnt know i lived in france and know chinese korean, even swagger, bad language both known as slaen talk. There places i studied.

    Core sa la blu Paris culinary university

    Or cordon blue. Unverisity after UOFS sucess by dron university

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  • our-whatever
    17.04.2021 - 2 hours ago

    🌼Bonjour🌼

    hii, hope you're doing fine.

    I’m back with an article reading. The topic is China and since I’m learning Mandarin, I thought it would be nice to get to know the country more. The article is a bit old, it’s from 2012 by Isaac Stone Fish from Foreign Policy.

    He talks about the situation in big cities with millions of citizens. I live in a small country; I can’t even imagine how can these many people live in one city. I never liked the idea of moving to a large city, I love to walk and I don’t want to give it up just to move to a megalopolis. I’ve watched a YouTube video recently where a Chinese lady showed how she lives in Hong Kong and after watching I decided that I would only go there as a tourist. The city is actually beautiful and amazingly multicultural but there were too many people on the streets, they were technically pushing each other out of the way. She also mentioned how rushed and stressed the city was, mostly because of the number of people living there.

    Many times, just as it's written in the article large cities are not as magical or beautiful as they are advertised. Isaac mentioned air pollution as it is a serious problem in many cities he had visited in China. I can’t imagine how you could live in a place where air pollution is so high that it tints the air. I don’t know if this got better or worse but I hope they found or will find a solution to solve this issue.

    thank you for reading, if you are interested in China-related articles, I recommend checking out Isaac’s writings as he is mostly concerned with the topic.

    take care~

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  • fadingfloweryouth
    17.04.2021 - 2 hours ago

    Cultural Appropriation among East Asian Popular Culture

    *I am aware that amidst the rise of AAPI hate crimes, this is a very sensitive time to be talking about this. However, I think it is very important for East Asians (in my case, a Chinese immigrant living in the States) to address our own ignorance and avoidance on this issue in order to have solidarity with other BIPOC communities. My emphasis is on the media portrayal of cultural appropriation and how that could be potentially damaging, I do not intend to imply that cultural appropriation is prominent among all East Asians.*

    If you are a frequent consumer of East Asian pop culture, you would be lying to say you haven’t seen an idol or a celebrity wearing dreads on camera. Sometimes they do so to create a streetwear look, sometimes they do so to deliberately play a character. We also tend to turn a blind eye to the countless bad rapping performances and the occasional half-joking bits about tribal, native cultures. As of now, many fans tend to defend their favs by calling these instances as acts of negligence, that none of these celebrities had an intent to harm; but how much longer, and farther, should we tolerate cultural appropriation in East Asian pop culture?

    East Asian popular culture has become part of the global mainstream in recent years. With the help of social media and the supplemental supports from local governments (think South Korea), today’s cultural flow go in both directions: while Asian pop culture is often inspired by Western elements, East Asian media production is now the new leading force of culture.

    One “neutral” definition of cultural appropriation could be summarized as the representation of cultural practices or experiences and the distinctive artistic styles of the particular culture used by nonmembers. However, misrepresentation, misunderstanding and manipulation of culture is frequent and damaging to many marginalized, underrepresented groups.

    Appropriating Hip-hop

    Even though there is a “neutral” definition of cultural appropriation, there is no neutral way to appropriate a culture. The moment you partake in a cultural practice that is not your own, you are marking it with your own social marker. Just to give an example, the rise of Gangsta Rap was in response to the mass incarceration of Black people during the War on Drugs era. The history of rap and hip-hop, as a whole, is tightly connected to Black lives in America.

    So why is Asian rap so filled with flexing culture? The answer is simple. The rise of hip hop and rap in the East Asian music scene is a simple copy-and-paste of the Western pop chart. Hip-hop has become the best selling genre, yet it’s important to note that today’s hip-hop has taken a detour away from its root. Hip-hop and rap has been rendered with pop sounds, often rendered with the voices of white performers as well.

    The idol factories in both South Korea and China had picked up the trend. Hip-hop and rap is what gets the cash, so that’s where the executives want to take their trainees. Shows like The Rap of China(这就是说唱), Rap for Youth(说唱新时代), received enormous popularity in the last few years among young Chinese people. While the popularization of these shows can help nurture more diversifying music tastes beyond the typical Chinese pop music, they portray rap and hip hop in a highly inaccurate fashion. The flows and forms featured in performances felt unilateral, often with a strong emphasis on flexin’ solely for the sake of flexin’. In addition, in no way did any of these shows serve to educate music lovers on the history and background of hip hop and rap.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5hIJnBh7Dv8

    P.s. this video features Rich Brian, I think it goes without saying that he’s probably not the best person to be educating Chinese youth on rapping.

    Appropriating Black Hairstyles

    Some contestants of these hip-hop shows also wore appropriated versions of Black hairstyles, and it wouldn’t be far fetched for me to say that the increased popularity of dreads among Kpop idols had kicked off this trend. Some of these celebrities are people who I have immense respects for, such as Jackson Wang. As the Chinese member of the Kpop boy group GOT7, he was the only Chinese celebrity (that I’m aware of) who spoke up for the BLM protests openly on his social media (I should note that he received quite a lot of backlashes for “defending violence”). But he—as I found out—refused to apologize when being criticized for wearing dreads back in 2016. He was called out in 2016 for wearing dreadlocks in a Pepsi commercial. He claimed that he did not intend to be racist. However, his fans questioned his response, as his defense did not acknowledge the history of dreadlocks.

    More recently, BTS’s J-Hope was also called out for his hairstyle in his first solo single, “Chicken Noodle Soup.” Not only was his hair called out to be tiptoeing the line of cultural appropriation, it also felt odd that he only switched to the dreadlock-looking hairstyle during the nighttime break-dancing scene in the music video. While this might not have any further implications intended by the artist himself, this is an example of how infiltrating the unprofessional, gang-affiliated stereotypes surrounding dreadlocks could be.

    Part of me thinks they are doing this to please white people, I could easily be right. White people are interested in hip-hop but can’t go as far as getting interested in Black culture? Sure, we Asians will provide. I sound harsh but that’s truly how I see the logic behind Asian pop stars appropriating Black culture. It’s true that many from the K-pop industry do not have full authority to their own identity, but I simply do not get the extent of appropriation employed in the K-pop scene—and this sabotaging trend is spreading in a scary rate to both Japan and China.

    Reality TV in China features mostly celebrities, but I assume the goal of the government (for producing all these shows) is to achieve some sort of relatability through portraying famous people doing normal things. Again, just like how Western culture and East Asian culture influence each other, creating a feedback loop, an echo chamber of what’s socially acceptable and what’s not, famous people and normal people alike are all capable of influencing the social norms of Asia. We in America indulge in drama, the unethical wrongdoings of distant rich people. It’s not like that in Asia. People look up to celebrities. So if someone in Blackpink decided to wear braids in their newest music video, you’re bound to see kids trying to do the same.

    Internalized Colorism

    Sure, one can argue that it’s all negligence and ignorance, but we can not pretend the acts of cultural appropriation are not a result of internalized colorism. Blatant racism is less likely to occur in East Asian societies since they tend to have a less diverse ethnic makeup, but internalized colorism has always been an underlying problem in East Asia. Take China as an example, being “light skin” (though the direct translation of the Chinese word “白” is equivalent to “white,” the phrase is usually perceived as “light skin”) is generally viewed as elegant, pretty, or decent. Phrases such as “yellow skin,” “black skin” have risen to popularity in recent years as internet slangs used by online participants to criticize celebrities or themselves. People strive to be as “white” as possible by setting a societal expectation for public figures to follow, creating this social discourse chamber that deems the white skintone to be superior.

    Even more recently, the phrase “非酋” (direct translation: “African tribe leader”) is used as a metaphor for people who tend to have very bad luck and never get what they wish for. From the perspective of an outsider, not only is this phrase obviously racist, it is also more dangerous in the sense that the metaphor entails a long line of other language-specific words that imply racially-charged stereotypes that could not be easily understood by non-Chinese. The phrase itself, however, is often used lightly by gamers--since this is actually an official phrase that ties to certain characters in certain games--and other young internet users to ironically joke about themselves without really considering the racist undertones of the phrase. Therefore, while using the phrase itself does not necessarily make one racist, it certainly reveals ignorance of the Chinese society on the issue of race.

    Online Community, Bullet Comments and Echo Chamber

    A single character in Japanese/Chinese tends to carry a lot more information than a single letter. As a result, there could easily be more combinations of words with the same characters in comparison to the alphabet for Roman languages. With the rise of fan-fueled, fan-made, fan-moderated video/social platforms like Bilibili (Chinese) and Niconico (Japanese), internet slangs are becoming increasingly niche. However, “niche” is defined against the traditional sense here. Slangs are only “niche” in the sense that the context is only known to a very specific audience, perhaps a fandom of a game or a show, but this audience itself could be enormous--certainly in the case of China. In these separate but internally united communities, people communicate in slangs that are culturally specific among themselves. How, you may ask? Through the persistence and permanence of bullet comments.

    Up till this point, bullet comments are popular only and specifically to Japanese and Chinese cultures, again, a likely result of the linguistic natures of the languages. The chaotic, seemingly-never ending feature of bullet comments is an easy tool to nurture a sense of tight-knitted community for young internet users. Teens no longer need to worry about parents’ attempts to understand youth culture--most adults literally can not bear with the overwhelming screen of repetitive slangs. Bullet comments granted a new sense of freedom that previous generations of Japanese and Chinese youth did not experience.

    However, it also means that bullet comments could create the perfect scenario for a social echo chamber. It’s hard for outsiders to penetrate the existing banters among a community that talks in their own lingos, and it also encourages the repetitiveness of the same idea, same belief. But this is not a characteristic specific to bullet comments or online communities in East Asia, this is a characteristic common among many East Asian cultures. In comparison to Western cultures, East Asians are way more comfortable, even dependent on group mentality and general consensus. Relatability is often prioritized over individuality on the internet scape, which on its own isn’t necessarily an issue; but this nature of East Asian online community certainly makes it a particularly weak target to colorist beliefs and culturally-insensitive content.

    The reliant tendency on echo chamber and group mentality of East Asian communities makes them vulnerable targets of certain Western influences, including cultural appropriation and internalized colorism. In the case of China, its government literally banks on unity among its citizens to establish more extensive social control in order to rule. In both Korea and Japan, unity and group mentality are strongly encouraged and embraced as well. Ultimately, while the problem of cultural appropriation is becoming increasingly worrying among pop culture in East Asia, this is a foreign concept and problem for East Asians who might be helping the spread of cultural appropriation. Regardless, education on the subject matter is necessary and we need to start addressing the problem now.

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  • asian-guys-paradise
    17.04.2021 - 2 hours ago

    didi

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