#competition Tumblr posts

  • .Motivated By.

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  • Guidance for the Day - I don’t believe you have to be better than everybody else. I believe you have to be better than you ever thought you could be - Ken Venturi




    #guidancefortheday #kickstartyourday #mgquotes #motivation #inspiration #qotd #mountaineersofinstagram #supersaturdays #saturdaymorning #saturdaymotivation #lifequotes #morningmotivation #quoteoftheday #quotestoinspire #quotesdaily #quotesgram #motivationalquotes #inspirationalquotes #keepmoving #life #quotes #bebetterthanself #challengeyourself #selfcompetition #selfmotivation #selfbelief

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  • The All American Club, Burns, Oregon by austin granger Please press ‘L’ for a better view on black. https://flic.kr/p/efLiC4

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  • Missing on Threadless vote or share if you can!

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  • 🎈🎉🎊 #competition 🎊🎉🎈

    We’ve just taken delivery of a our #flaminjoesUK #flaminreaper #truckerhat and to say thanks we’d like to give away one of our hats and a nice bag of fresh #carolinareaper peppers 🔥🔥🔥🔥(approx 20 pods)

    To enter you’ll need to follow 3 steps…

    1/ Follow our social Flamin'Joe’s UK social media outlets, Instagram, Facebook page and Twitter
    2/ Like and Share this post
    3/ Tag your friends and place a 🌶️ next to each individual tag so we can track entries.

    A winner will be drawn on Monday and then posted out to the winner via tracked postage to a UK address **UK entry only** 🌍🇬🇧🌶️ (Obviously you’ll need to supply us with a postage address 🙄)

    **This competition is in no way associated with Facebook, Twitter Or Instagram**
    https://www.instagram.com/p/CDlfsgyhS7t/?igshid=s6rr9jmpw7hf

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  • One piece of the changes we need.

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  • MVRDVがドイツ、カールスルーエの地区再開発マスタープランのコンペで勝利 (ArchDaily)
    MVRDV Wins Competition to Design the Masterplan of the Ettlinger Tor Area in Karlsruhe, Germany (ArchDaily)

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  • Eatbrain DJ Tournament Round 2 | NOXIOUS by Noxious ᵈᵑᵇ https://ift.tt/33vdiNu

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  • Hey guys!

    Haven’t been as active lately and it’s been a bit of a rough patch in the personal life. But there is always positivity to be found and this commission was one.

    Huge thank you to @zuulosdovah for doing this for me. AU of course, but I thought it would be hilarious if there was somehow implied competition between Kaina and David for Merula’s affections XD don’t worry they’re still friends.

    I like to think of this as a parody of male Merula fans vs. female Merula fans haha. Anyway enjoy guys! 

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    Qualifiers are open worldwide until August 9th. Top 25 fastest typists will compete for the cash prize of $5000 and more. Hit the link for more details.

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  • Hi! My name is Valerie, and I’m a high school student who’s attended (and won) quite a few hackathons. I’m here to give you some tips on how to run your own hackathon! I’ve also included a section on virtual hackathons towards the end of this post, given that they are especially relevant today.


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    What is a hackathon?

    A hackathon is an event where attendees form teams to create coding projects within a given time period (typically 24 hours). Afterwards, teams have the option to submit and pitch their project (via platforms such as Devpost) to a panel of judges for a chance to win a neat prize! Most hackathons have an overall winner and different category winners (e.g. best beginner hack, best web development, best mobile app, etc), so there are lots of opportunities for people to win prizes. 

    What gets made at a hackathon?

    The sky’s the limit. I’ve seen a large variety of projects made at the hackathons that I have been to. Teams can choose to create websites, apps, or games - I have even seen teams bring their own hardware to incorporate virtual reality (VR) into their projects! Typically, the different prize categories help teams decide what types of projects they want to work on. 

    Hackathon Essentials

    Interested in running a hackathon but don’t know where to start? There are four important categories to focus on: People, Space, Technology, and Activities

    People

    You can’t run a hackathon if you don’t have people at the event! From my experience, it is crucial to have participants, student staff, and judge/speakers at every student hackathon. 

    • Participants: Anyone who has been to a hackathon will say you don’t need to know how to code to attend a hackathon. This is 100% true! In fact, most hackathons will hold workshops to teach basic coding to beginners (anything from website development to mobile games). These workshops are often taught by student staff members or guest speakers. However, a simple introductory workshop can be taught by platforms such as Vidcode - no coding expert needed!

    • Student Staff: Recruiting a group of students to be a part of the staff is crucial to running a hackathon. Student Staff members are a helpful way to spread the word about your hackathon to their friends and classmates. In addition, during the hackathon, they are more approachable to students who need help with their projects than adult supervisors. You can probably find students who are willing to participate from coding/computer science clubs at your local high school or college.

    • Judges/Speakers: Judges and guest speakers are equally important as having participants at your hackathon. Finding these people is all about reaching out and contacting individuals who may be willing to volunteer. Reach out to anyone you may know in the tech industry: teachers, developers, software engineers etc. Most hackathons have sponsors who send representatives to judge and speak at workshops. 

    Space

    Make sure your venue has a hacking space (school gym/cafeteria) and a hangout/planning space (empty classrooms). Minimize distractions, and make sure attendees have space to spread out and write notes - portable whiteboards are great for this.

    Technology

    Without technology can there be a hackathon? Make sure to have good Wi-Fi, Audio/Visual Equipment, and some hardware

    • Wi-Fi: Wi-Fi is crucial! Without a good connection, most participants will not be able to work on their projects. In addition, the last thing the participants want is to lose connection in the middle of their pitch to the judges.

    • Audio/Visual Equipment: Audio/Visual Equipment is helpful when you are trying to communicate important information to the entire staff and participants. Most hackathons use presentations during their opening and closing ceremonies.

    • Hardware: Hardware is also important. However, it is not necessary. You do not need to provide a computer for every participant, they will bring their own device. However, larger hackathons provide hardware such as VR equipment and microphones for participants to use in their projects. 


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    Activities

    Hackathons are not just about the competition. There are non-coding activities/competitions and workshops

    • Non-Coding Activities/Competitions: Kids need a brain break! Coding for 24 hours is tough! Set up fun non-coding games and competitions like Capture the Flag, Cup Stacking, Chess, or Jeopardy.  

    • Workshops: Workshops are as important as the competition itself! Some people attend hackathons just to learn something at the workshops. As I mentioned before, these workshops can be taught by student staff or guest speakers, and they can range from beginner to advanced levels. 


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    Some Additional Tips

    Here are some other tips for hosting your own hackathon:

    • Outlets! Outlets! Outlets! Make sure you have plenty of outlets for your attendees. All of them will have to charge their devices at some point. 

    • Make sure you have a detailed schedule planned out. People need to know how much time they have until projects are due. They also want to know when certain activities and workshops will start. 

    • Get as many sponsors as you can. Most hackathons are free to attend thanks to the sponsors who pay for the meals and snacks at the events. They are also a great way to bring in judges and guest speakers. 

    • Prizes are the best incentive. Although prizes are not necessary, they are the best incentive for people to participate. 


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    Virtual Hackathons

    Especially with COVID-19, virtual hackathons have become more popular. Virtual hackathons are very similar to regular hackathons. The competitions and workshops are still there, the only difference is that there isn’t a physical venue for the event. In some ways, virtual hackathons may be easier to host. Participants code at home and submit their projects by a certain deadline. There are workshops held via livestream or Zoom, and there are staff members available virtually through platforms like Discord or Slack. In fact, hosting a virtual hackathon makes it easier to reach out to a wider range of people in different regions of the country or world!

    Well, what are you waiting for? You better get hacking!

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  • Just realised that I never posted the final version of my artstation challenge entry for the lightbox competition. I submitted it back on the 13th of July (i think) but here’s all my demon’s. 

    Had a bit of a panic when the deadline passed and I realised that I hadn’t officially submitted my entry, meaning it just said “unfinished” at the top of my page. But thankfully a cool guy called Daniel over at artstation support sorted it out for me. 

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  • We definitely compete for social status, but traditional accounts stop at the idea that we just compete for its own sake—trying to outdo each other. This is captured in theories that talk about the need for “distinction” and building fences between people. But we don’t compete just for it’s own sake. We compete to cooperate. That might sound like a minor difference, but it makes all the difference. Darwin also emphasized “social selection,” the idea that our fitness depends on the quality of our friendships, alliances, and relationships. So we compete to get social partners who we then cooperate with. That’s one reason why people are so obsessed with celebrities—our brains see them as great potential social partners—they are connected, influential, and powerful. We also see people who use certain products to reflect their lifestyle as desirable social partners.

    // Source

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  • Fandom: N/A
    Ship: Anonymous (OC) x Emily (OC)
    Rating: Older Audiences
    Warning: Car accident, Death, Suicide, Cancer, Orphanage
    Word Count: 2064 Words
    A/N: So in May?? I submitted this piece to a place for a competition that was offering VERY large sums of prize money. Long story short, I poured my heart and soul into this work, and even played to the judges areas of expertise, and I … lost. I was emailed the following month and told that my story was not even considered for the top 3, which angered me because, you know, you work so hard and are so proud of something and then you literally get told “it’s not good enough for us.”

    Anyway, this story is what the title says: Bridge. Because bridge can mean many different things. It’s a bittersweet story, yet also fairly depressing because I write sad things better than other things for some odd reason.

    Keep reading

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  • Did some shooting over the weekend, ended up 3rd overall, mostly from just not shooting 3 pistol targets

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