#england Tumblr posts

  • Tactical Takeaway: United needed to get VDB and Mata on to get a grip in midfield and Ole brought on two strikers, forgetting that if they can’t get the ball they won’t score. Klopp needs to sit Mane, Salah, and/or Firmino and mix things up; they need a break. Fatigue sometimes manifests as a lack of sharpness in your play, he knows this. They’ll say they’re fine, the staff will echo they’re fine, but they’re both wrong.

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  • It’s cute that Ole and the United executives think we’re going to compete in Champions League when transforming into Stoke United is the only chance we have against big teams. For me, this is why if they don’t finish a close second or win the league (in a winnable season) Ole can go.

    Take the time, find a good coach (I said coach, not manager) let him finish his contract while they search if they have to. But I wouldn’t renew his contract if he finishes third or lower, or finishes a distant second. If he finishes a close second or wins the league, I’d let him finish his contract and if he’s doing well in the final season THEN they should renew it. They’ll have time, no one’s looking to poach him.

    #tfd #ole gunnar solskjaer #manchester united#premier league#football#soccer#england #ole’s at the wheel
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  • Anyone else just love getting cheated on then get told somehow it’s my fault?

    Just me? Hm. 🤷🏼‍♀️

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  • Goodness, can we keep the ball for more than 5 seconds?? (Martial loses the ball) Guess not LoL. 73% pass accuracy, those are bottom half of the table numbers. Liverpool are good but come on now.

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    ✨S t o u r h e a d✨

    Throwback to the time where I got to visit one of my top favourite spots in my home county, which is also where they filmed a scene for 2005’s Pride and Prejudice.🌲
    I’d recommend visiting this beautiful garden (and house) to anyone and everyone, it’s simply wonderful.
    featuring my beautiful Jane Austen Tarot cards that I bought whilst in London last year.
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  • Just compare Thiago’s movement - with or without the ball - to Pogba’s today and ask me again why he frustrates me so much.

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  • I just figured out why Ole is so bad with subs. He doesn’t take that into account enough when he creates his starting lineup, he doesn’t think, “How can I change the game if these guys don’t work?” He limits himself with his lineups. So he starts his favorites, puts his favorites on the bench, say it’s for tactical reasons, and that’s why you’ll get weird subs like Daniel James on for Bruno or Tuanzebe on for Wan-Bissaka when we need a goal. 😂😂🤦🏾‍♂️

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  • Sri Lanka strikes but England on top

    Sri Lanka strikes but England on top

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    #cricket news #cricket news live #cricket results#england #sl vs eng #sri lanka
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  • 2020 was a year when the world came to a standstill. We were hit by the coronavirus COVID-19 which had a massive impact on our ‘normality’. In the UK, various measures were introduced in order to reduce the spread of the virus but did we act quickly enough? Before going into this further, what is the coronavirus and where did it come from?

    On the gov.uk website, it states that on 31st December 2019 the WHO (World Health Organisation) was informed of pneumonia cases from an unknown cause in Wuhan city in the Hubei Province of China. Almost two weeks later on 12th January 2020, a coronavirus had been identified in samples from cases which suggested that this caused the outbreak. This virus is referred to as SARS-CoV-2 and the associated disease COVID-19 has now spread to many parts of the world. Coronaviruses refers to the family of viruses with some causing less severe diseases such as the common cold and others causing more severe diseases such as Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) and Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS).

    COVID-19 can be transmitted between people through respiratory and contact routes. Transmission risk is thought to be highest when people are in close proximity (within two metres); airborne transmission may also occur in poorly ventilated indoor spaces particularly if individuals are in the same room together for long periods of time.

    In the UK, cases and deaths started to rise in early 2020 and the country officially entered a national lockdown on 23rd March which required the public to stay at home. The public were only able to leave their homes for limited reasons such as food shopping, exercise once a day, medical reasons and travelling for work when necessary. All non-essential shops were closed and gatherings of more than two people in public were banned as were events such as weddings and funerals. The introduction of the coronavirus job protection scheme (furlough scheme) meant that workers unable to work from home were able to have 80% of their wages covered.

    On 28th May, it was announced that groups of six can meet outside and soon after on 1st June, schoolchildren in England in Reception, Year 1 and Year 6 were able to return to schools. Non-essential shops re-opened in mid-June and in the following month, a list of 73 countries and territories where English tourists can visit without self-isolating on their return was published. On 24th July, it was mandatory for customers visiting shops to wear a mask. Schools re-opened in September 2020 and to prevent more cases and deaths rising during the second wave, the Prime Minister announced new restrictions on 22nd September which included a 10pm curfew on pubs, bars and restaurants. A month later, the country entered a second lockdown lasting for four weeks.

    We are currently in the third national lockdown which came into effect from 4th January. It is not certain how long this lockdown will last but Prime Minister Boris Johnson is confident we will be able to vaccinate 15 million people by mid-February. While we now have access to three types of vaccines (Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine, Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine and the Moderna vaccine) to combat COVID-19, we have not had the vaccines long enough to fully understand the side effects in the long-run which is very risky as it could cause complications further down the line.

    Despite the UK’s efforts to reduce the spread of COVID-19 so far, it could be argued that the measures that have been put into place since the beginning of the pandemic have not been strict enough. The use of masks and social distancing should have been mandatory from the start and borders should have been closed to prevent the risk of COVID-19 being brought into the country and also being spread to other countries. Many industries were hit hard by the pandemic but the government’s decision to allow Britons to go on holiday in the summer of 2020 for example was poor. Other industries such as retail and hospitality and small businesses have also struggled but the public’s health and safety should have been and should remain the priority.

    Had stricter measures been brought in sooner, it is most likely that the COVID-19 situation now may be completely different. Other countries such as Australia and China where the coronavirus originated from have now resumed back to near-normality whereas cases and deaths in the UK continue to rise. The hasty approval of the vaccines could be seen as a panicked decision to reduce the spread of the virus as the government’s previous attempts have so far not been as successful as they had hoped. At present, the public feels confused by the mixed messages and may feel complacent due to being in and out of lockdown. As a result, the country has had to suffer the consequences which could have been prevented earlier and it is now uncertain if the country is able to recover from the damage.

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  • Lost London: Walking the Falcon Brook

    Note: this walk was completed in early December 2020, before London entered Tier 4 restrictions, and before the start of national lockdown in January 2021.

    After the meeting of its Hydburn and Streathbourne branches, the Falcon Brook continues in a north-westerly direction, still running below residential streets, until there is a sudden shift on reaching Northcote Road, where things take on a more distinctly middle-class high street feel. This is the so-called “Nappy Valley”, a line of shops and cafés following the valley carved out by the Falcon Brook between Clapham and Wandsworth Commons. It’s also very busy at weekends (particularly if London has just emerged from Lockdown 2.0 and has yet to experience Tiers 3 or 4…).

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    Dodging the parents and toddlers out for their dairy-free lattes and organic/gluten-free cakes, as the walker approaches the end of Northcote Road and the start of St John’s Road, another hint of the river emerges. The shops on the western side of the street follow the line of the river, which curves away from the line of the road.

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     A more obvious link to the river is found at the Falcon pub; whether it took its name from the river or (like the river itself) from the rising falcon crest of the lords of Battersea Manor is unclear. 

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    At the same junction as the Falcon, the walker can also see the Edwardian baroque building that was once Arding & Hobbs department store (until recently it was a branch of Debenhams), and the rebuilt Party Superstore, a notable casualty of the 2011 London riots.

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    The Falcon Brook carries on following the course of Falcon Road, taking it under a large railway bridge adjacent to Clapham Junction station – which was once more appropriately (the station being a mile from the nearest end of Clapham) known as Falcon Bridge. Once under the bridge, the Falcon references come thick and fast, with Falcon Grove, Falcon Terrace, Falcon Glade, and The Falcons estate.

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    These traces of the river do not last for long though, its route suddenly turns west, joined at this point by another subterranean stream, the Heath Brook, and the underground waters run below tower blocks from the 1950s, 60s and 70s. Beyond these it runs underneath the small green space of York Gardens, which is next doors to the Falconbrook Pumping Station, built for handling storm water when the river’s sewer becomes full – flooding from the Falcon Brook is common in this area.

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    After York Gardens, until the 1960s the walker would have been able to see the mouth of the river as it met the Thames; here it was known as Battersea Creek, and was once used as a dock for the now-closed Price’s Candle Factory, much of which has now been converted into shops and flats. Besides a more modern car showroom, a large green stink pipe reveals the location of the covered river.

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    A short walk along a footpath besides a landscaped pond (it doesn’t seem to be directly connected to any flowing waters) brings the walker rather suddenly to the Thames; after much of the walk offering little traces of the Falcon Brook, it feels like it is quickly lost again.

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  • Sri Lanka strikes but England on top

    Sri Lanka strikes but England on top

    Visitors need just 36 more runs with seven wickets in hand.

    Sri Lanka rattled England with three quick wickets late on the fourth day of the first Test in Galle on Sunday, but the visitors remained favourites to win the match with just 36 more runs needed and seven wickets in hand.
    England was expected to comfortably close in on a victory after Sri Lanka finished with 359 in its second innings,…

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    #cricket news #cricket news live #cricket results#England #SL vs ENG #Sri Lanka
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  • Commentator: “He promised to knock them off their perch and boy did he!” Knocked them off their perch and buried them. Day made. 😂

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    Originally posted by theweatha

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  • It was really amazing.❤❤https://youtu.be/10wHUBrpnts

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  • At least Jurgen did what I thought he should and start Shaqiri to throw an X factor at United that they’re not accustomed to playing against. I would’ve started Minamino over Mane or Salah for the same reason, leave one of their best weapons in reserve for later if you need them.

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  • The chapel of St Nicholas, in Tytherton Lucas, Wiltshire, dates to the 13th century though it was rebuilt in 1802, with a 12th century bell.

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