#eponine Tumblr posts

  • antisocial-cheesepuff
    23.07.2021 - 14 hours ago

    sparknotes did NOT go there omfg

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  • ineedyouhome-webcomic
    23.07.2021 - 14 hours ago

    Eponine

    💟 She/They

    💟 Non- Binary Lesbian

    💟 19 years old (Birthday: March 22nd)

    💟 Star sign: Aries

    💟 Degree: Social Work

    💟 Loves thrift shopping

    💟 When she was younger she did ballet and loved it. They were very bitter when their parents stopped paying for the lessons.

    💟 Lives with her parents and her two siblings Gavroche and Azelma, but wants to move out.

    💟 Every month, after paying the bills, they take Gavroche and Azelma somewhere fun and spend the day with them.

    💟 Her bills also consist of buying essentials and food for her siblings. She is the one that takes care of them most of the time.

    --

    we will be posting character profiles twice a week until the first update in late August!

    Follow us and reblog!

    #exr#les miserables #i need you home webcomic #inyh webcomic#inyh #i need you (home) webcomic #inyh profiles#les mis#eponine
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  • incorrecteponine
    23.07.2021 - 15 hours ago

    Eponine: You know, when I was little I used to pretend you weren't my real mother.

    Madame Thenardier: Me too.

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  • lescommunity
    22.07.2021 - 1 day ago

    Community S04E12 Heroic Origins

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  • miserablesme
    22.07.2021 - 1 day ago

    The Les Miserables Changelog Part 8: 1997 Broadway 10th Anniversary

    Hello, everyone! This is the latest edition in my attempt to chronicle all of the musical and lyrical changes which the show Les Miserables has undergone over the years. After a few consecutive editions focused on regional choices, we're finally back to official libretto distinctions. Specifically, this edition covers a substantial rewrite that occured in 1997.

    To fully understand the circumstances in which this rewrite took place, it is useful to look at some background information. The original Broadway production of Les Miserables was definitely not its most popular production from an audience perspective. The cast tended to be judged as inferior to touring and international productions. Moreover, cast members often stayed in Broadway productions for very long time periods, leading many to question the show's freshness.

    Consequently, there was a large-scale firing to the point that, in January 1997, every principal cast member was let go except for Christopher Innvar (Javert). For the next month and a half, the third national tour cast would perform on Broadway.

    March 12, 1997 marked exactly ten years since the original Broadway production opened. To mark this occasion (and perhaps to direct attention away from the questionable ethics of essentially firing an entire workforce on short notice), a new cast would officially take over from the third national tour cast on this day. Not only this, but the show which this new cast would perform was freshened significantly (an update that would also be applied to all existing and new replica productions worldwide soon afterwards). The blocking was adjusted to give off more energy, the lighting was digitized and made more complex, the sound effects were made more realistic, the sets and costumes were refurbished and in some cases changed... and the libretto received many edits. Let's get into what actually was changed...

    Oh, and as a side note, not all of the changes were made simultaneously. Most were, but a few small edits (mostly musical cuts) were made later in 1997. I suspect that, in acknowledgement of Cameron Mackintosh's reservations prior to the original London productions as well as a warning of what would come in a few years' time, those cuts may have been made in order to reduce overtime costs to crew members. That is only a theory of mine, however; please take it with a grain of salt.

    Anyway, let's get our analysis started!

    1997 Update #1

    The first libretto change (in a sense) occurs during "Lovely Ladies". Granted, this is a change that had already been applied unofficially in the Broadway and West End productions; however, I'm not sure if it was ever used in the US Tour previously. Originally this was the lyrical sequence:

    (SAILORS - simultaneously with prostitutes’ lines)

    Lovely lady, fastest on the street

    Wasn’t there three minutes

    She was back up on her feet

    Lovely lady, what you waiting for

    Doesn’t take a lot of savvy just to be a whore

    Come on lady, what’s a lady for?

    (PROSTITUTES - simultaneously with sailors’ lines)

    Lovely ladies, lovely little girls

    Lovely ladies, lovely little ladies

    Lovely girlies, lovely little girls

    We are lovely, lovely girls

    Lovely ladies, what’s a lady for?

    The sequence was finally officially replaced with the following exchange (that was more or less invented for the 1992 UK tour):

    (PROSTITUTE)

    God I’m weary, sick enough to drop

    Belly burns like fire

    Will the bleeding ever stop?

    (PIMP)

    Cheer up dearie, show a happy face

    Plenty more like you, dear

    If you can’t keep up the pace

    (PROSTITUTE)

    Only joking, dearie knows her place

    Interestingly, this officially version uses "Will the bleeding ever stop" as the West End and Broadway production previously did (as opposed to the 1992 "Will the bleeding never stop"); however, it also uses "you, dear" from the 1992 edit, as opposed to "you here" as had been used in the West End and Broadway productions. However, many individuals continued to sing "you here" for many years to come.

    In "Fantine's Arrest", Bamatabois originally declares:

    You've got some nerve, you little whore

    You've got some gall!

    The 1992 UK tour introduced the following variation, which had also been used in the West End production prior to this edit:

    You've got some sauce, you ugly slut

    You've got some gall!

    The 1997 libretto combined these two versions into the following line:

    You've got some nerve, you ugly slut

    You've got some gall!

    However, the original "Little whore" was maintained in the libretto as an alternate lyric. I do like how "little whore" actually rhymes with the preceding line ("I won't pay more"), though "ugly slut" does carry more threat. The West End production went with "ugly slut" after this libretto change, while other productions stuck to "little whore" for the time being.

    Note that the rest of "Fantine's Arrest" plays out the same as it had since 1986, and did not include any of the other 1992 UK tour variations.

    Right off the bat, "The Runaway Cart" is different in this version. The scene now begins with a sound effect of a horse's neigh, a nice little touch that brings one far more in the moment than one might otherwise be (particularly since modern audiences likely wouldn't immediately envision a horse when hearing about a crash). Moreover, the original yell of "Look out! It's a runaway cart!" has been eliminated in favor of more improvised remarks.

    The townspeople's remarks mostly are consistent with the 1992 UK tour edit, with one exception. This is how the UK tour lyrics (which were also used in the West End production) went:

    Look at that

    Stay away

    You’ll be crushed by the cart

    Don’t approach

    Don’t go near

    It’ll fall on you too

    Oh my god, who is that?

    It’s Monsieur Fauchelevent

    He is caught by the wheel

    Oh the pitiful man

    There is nothing to do

    The version used on Broadway and in the US tour in the mid-90s was as follows:

    Look at that

    Stay away

    You’ll be crushed by the cart

    Don’t approach

    Don’t go near

    At the risk of your life

    Oh my god, who is that?

    It’s Monsieur Fauchelevent

    He is caught by the wheel

    Oh the pitiful man

    There is nothing to do

    The 1997 libretto cemented the scene as follows:

    Look at that

    Stay away

    You’ll be crushed by the cart

    Don’t approach

    Don’t go near

    It’s that load, it'll fall

    Oh my god, who is that?

    It’s Monsieur Fauchelevent

    He is caught by the wheel

    Oh the pitiful man

    There is nothing to do

    I really like how much clearer in meaning the changed line is, although a part of me still has a soft spot for the rhyme scheme of the UK tour.

    The crowd's response to Valjean's plea for help has been changed. Since 1987, this is how it went:

    Don't go near him, Monsieur Mayor

    The load is as heavy as hell

    The old man is a goner for sure

    It will kill you as well

    The 1997 libretto edited the penultimate line:

    Don't go near him, Monsieur Mayor

    The load is as heavy as hell

    If you touch it the whole thing will fall

    It will kill you as well

    I suppose the revised lyric makes it clearer what exactly the danger is. On the flip side, though, the line "It will kill you as well" feels a bit less natural. Originally it meant "it will kill you as well as the other man who will be killed"; a fairly natural progression. Now, though, it essentially means "it will kill you as well as falling". This does make sense, but it doesn't really sound like a phrasing any real person would actually use.

    The rest of the cart crash scene plays out as it did in the original version (not the UK tour version).

    "Who Am I?" starts out differently right off the bat. These are the original opening lyrics:

    He thinks that man is me

    He knew him at a glance

    The 1997 libretto uses these lyrics instead:

    He thought that man was me

    Without a second glance

    The revised lyrics make ever-so-slightly more sense, since "knew him at a glance" implies a degree of correctness that obviously is false in this context. Having said that, I do slightly prefer the present tense of the original, since the fact that this false belief is continuous is integral to Valjean's dilemma. The revised lyrics give it a sense of the past that isn't really appropriate to the context.

    Soon afterwards, a small lyrical edit makes the implications of the dilemma itself quite a bit different. Originally, after reflecting on the future employment of his works, Valjean repeated the same lyrics he sung earlier:

    If I speak, I am condemned

    If I stay silent, I am damned

    The 1997 libretto tweaked the remark a bit:

    If I speak, they are condemned

    If I stay silent, I am damned

    Only two short words are changed, yet the substance of his worry is completely different! Originally, Valjean's reservations are based primarily on how he would be viewed if he failed to provide his workers with the employment they need. Now, however, he is much more selfless, and is actually worried directly by their well-being. Much more appropriate given that Valjean is supposed to be such a redeemed man!

    The West End production had once given Valjean the "You know where to find me!" line after "Who Am I?" and the Australian tour had given him the line "You will find me at the hospital St. John!" However, these were not official libretto remarks, and at least since 1987 he officially remained silent after his high note. This changed in the 1997 libretto, in which an optional line based heavily on the Australian tour one follows the number: "You will find me at the hospital!"

    For the next five years, American productions generally would generally the line while, ironically given the production history, the West End show would not.

    Since 1986 or so, the "Confrontation" number began with a bar of instrumentals, before Javert began his "Valjean, at last..." line. No more; the 1997 libretto has him begin singing acapella. Only during the second syllable of "Valjean" do the instrumentals start.

    The next edit can be heard during the preamble to "Master of the House". A few lines are adjusted among the inn customers. Originally this is how the scene went:

    Landlord over here

    Where's the bloody man?

    One more for the road

    One more slug of gin

    Just one more

    Or my old man is gonna do me in!

    The 1997 libretto made it as follows:

    Where's the wretched man?

    Landlord over here

    One more for the road

    One more slug of gin

    Just one more

    Or my old man is gonna do me in!

    I suppose the change from "bloody" to "wretched" was probably intended to make the show more accessible to non-British audience, since "bloody" does not seem to be a word frequently used in America or other countries. (Weirdly though, Thenardier keeps his "always pissed as newts" line from earlier; one would expect the word to be replaced with "drunk" or something along those lines!)

    The change in order of the first two lines in the excerpt I quoted strikes me as odd. The original sequence of lines allows "man" and "gin" to form of a sort of off-rhyme, something lost with the 1997 order of lines. Did the writers decide that the off-rhyme was so awkward that it would sound better if they just didn't try at all? Who knows...

    What is probably this libretto's most significant change in the entire musical happens right before the "Waltz of Treachery". While the original Barbican run had a rather extensive Well Scene, since the West End transfer the "Waltz of Treachery" just began with Valjean and Cosette's humming duet to the tune of "Castle on a Cloud". A short but lovely little scene was added between Valjean and Cosette in the 1997 libretto:

    (VALJEAN)

    Hush now, do not be afraid of me

    Don't cry, show me where you live

    Tell me my child, what is your name

    (INSTRUMENTALS)

    (COSETTE)

    I'm called Cosette

    (VALJEAN)

    (*spoken*) Cosette...

    The usual humming duet immediately follows. This scene gives some much-appreciated context to the "Waltz of Treachery", and to Valjean and Cosette's relationship as a whole. Honestly it feels a little incomplete to me nowadays when I listen to the audio of pre-1997 performances of the show. Valjean actually meeting Cosette seems like such an important detail to include! John Caird agreed with me evidently. To quote page 143 of 1990's The Complete Book of Les Miserables:

    "If ever there is an amended English version of the show he would like to reinstate the Cosette-Valjean meeting. 'It was beautifully written - one of the most moving scenes in the show,' he says. 'It was taken out for technical reasons, but the well scene was moving and could have stayed.'"

    It's heartwarming to see that Caird got his wish. I do wonder what exactly those technical reasons were, and whether or not the revised staging may explain why it could finally be reinstated.

    On the flipside, there is a noticeable cut after the "Waltz of Treachery". After Valjean's "There's a castle just waiting for you", the 1987 libretto has about sixteen seconds of instrumentals to the tune of the number, followed by a reprise of Valjean and Cosette's humming duet. This is in turn followed by about eighteen more seconds of instrumentals, which transition into the "Look Down" number.

    The 1997 libretto removes the reprise of the humming duet. Now, after "There's a castle just waiting for you", the eighteen latter seconds of instrumentals immediately play, and "Look Down" begins right afterwards. Although this leads to a more energetic change of scenery, I must say that the Thenardier's inn segment of the show feels a bit unresolved without the closing recollection of "Castle on a Cloud".

    After Gavroche's opening lyrics to "Look Down", there was originally a musical sequence which played and then was repeated twice before the argument between the beggar woman and the prostitute. However, the 1997 libretto reduced this part so that it is only repeated once.

    The same number soon takes a cue from the original pre-Broadway script. After the exchange between the beggar woman and the prostitute, this was the original exchange (which was still being used in the West End production at the time). Each line is a solo, with the latter one being sung by a male and the other three by females:

    When's it gonna end?

    When're we gonna live?

    Something's gotta happen, dearie

    Something's gotta give

    However, the Broadway production had changed it to an ensemble piece:

    When's it gonna end?

    When're we gonna live?

    Something's gotta happen now or

    Something's gotta give

    The 1997 libretto brought it back to solo lines, once again with women singing the first three lines and a man singing the last:

    When's it gonna end?

    When're we gonna live?

    Something's gotta happen now

    Something's gotta give

    I've already noted in the past that I like the scene better as an ensemble piece. Oh well... It also slightly bugs me that the amount of syllables so much less naturally given that the third line loses a syllable. As we'll get into in later editions of this blog, a lot of producers apparently agreed with me, because a lot of productions slightly edited the exchange!

    A more subtle difference is audible later in "Look Down". Previously, the line "Something for a crust of bread in Holy Jesus' name" was sung by the ensemble along with the rest of the "See our children fed..." segment. However, the 1997 libretto changed it into a solo line sung by a single beggar woman (despite the rest of the segment remaining an ensemble piece).

    This edit was made to account for a change in staging. Prior to 1997, Marius and Enjolras stood on the ground, and the beggars began surrounding them while singing the ensemble piece. It made since for the entire thing to be a group effort. However, since 1997, Marius and Enjolras instead stand on the second level of the set, where they sing their lines to the beggars down below. The beggar woman with the "Something for a crust of bread" line walks by them on the set's second level, explaining why she along sings the line now.

    As a side note, the 1987 Australian tour had previously made this exact same lyrical change. This makes me wonder if that production made a similar staging change earlier.

    A change in the music was made to "The Robbery" alongside a staging change. Prior to 1997, Thenardier's con job was staged with him standing with a cane and hiding his right leg, making him look like he was missing a leg. This strikes me as an odd holdover from the pre-Broadway lyrics, in which the actual substance of his plea reflects his missing leg. However, the 1997 staging made it so that he is sitting down while turning the crank on a music box. The instrumentals to this part of the musical were simplified and made more synthetic in order to sound as though they were coming from the music box. I am not a fan of this change at all; it's far too self-aware for me to take the scene remotely seriously.

    A change to "Red and Black" that was already widely used before this point was solidified into the show. Instead of opening with the first chords of the number, it now officially opens now with the sting that was introduced in the 1992 UK tour and which was later adapted into Broadway, the third national tour, and most international productions. For many years post-1997, it can be heard in every replica production.

    To quote myself from part five of this blog:

    "If I’m not mistaken, this musical addition was placed in to account for a change in staging. Originally the number began with the barricade set sliding off-stage, revealing the ABC cafe set behind it. However, around the time of this tour the blocking was adjusted. Now, the turntable instead revolved at the beginning of this number, revealing the ABC cafe set on the other end of the turntable and allowing the barricade set to double as the walls of the cafe. I believe the opening sting was added to allow time for this slightly more elaborate staging."

    An extremely subtle difference occurs later during "Red and Black". Originally, Enjolras sings:

    The color of the world

    Is changing day by day

    However, since 1997 he instead sings:

    The colors of the world

    Are changing day by day

    This is a tiny change, to the point that it took me probably a few dozen listens of both pre-1997 and post-1997 audios to pick up on the distinction. Small as it may be, though, it's a very welcome edit. Given that the song revolves around more than one color (to the point that both colors are literally in the title), I honestly find it baffling that the lyric was ever written in the singular, let alone that it managed to hold onto that version for over a decade!

    "Lamarque is Dead" is edited so that its lyrics are now consistent with the 1992 UK tour ones, as well as West End performances after that tour. Originally the lyrics were as follows:

    On his funeral day they will honor his name

    It’s a rallying cry that will reach every ear

    In the death of Lamarque we will kindle the flame

    They will see that the day of salvation is near

    The time is here…

    However, the 1997 libretto made them into what the West End and UK tour productions were already using:

    On his funeral day they will honor his name

    With the light of rebellion ablaze in their eyes

    From their candles of grief we will kindle our flame

    On the tomb of Lamarque shall our barricades rise

    The time is here…

    I generally prefer the revised lyrics, as I've discussed in earlier editions of this blog.

    "The Attack on Rue Plumet" contains a couple of edits. First off, the exchange between Eponine and Montparnasse originally begins with a set of instrumentals played four times in a row. However, the 1997 edit shortened it to only two times in a row.

    Originally, Thenardier sings to Brujon:

    You shut your mouth

    Give me your hand

    Post-1997, he instead sings:

    You shut your mouth

    You'll get what's yours

    This edit was another that was partially made for the sake of a staging stage. In the original blocking, Thenardier and the gang are trying to climb over Valjean's gate, and Brujon would literally be using his hand to help Thenardier out. However, the 1997 staging changes things so that the gang is trying to pick the lock. This is much less of a group effort for obvious reasons.

    Additionally, the new lyric has slightly more threatening undertones, given its implications of either positive or negative outcomes depending on how helpful Brujon actually is.

    Later in the number, after Eponine's scream, Thenardier's reaction takes some cues from the original libretto. Pre-Broadway, these were the lyrics (which were still used in the West End at the time):

    Make for the sewers, don't wait around

    Leave her to me, go underground

    You wait my girl, you'll rue this night

    I'll make you scream, you'll scream alright!

    Post-1987, this was the sequence instead:

    You wait my girl, you'll rue this night

    I'll make you scream, you'll scream alright!

    Leave her to me, don't wait around

    Make for the sewers, go underground

    The 1997 edit essentially combined elements of those two versions:

    Make for the sewers, go underground

    Leave her to me, don't wait around

    You wait my girl, you'll rue this night

    I'll make you scream, you'll scream alright!

    So the lines remain in the post-1987 form, but they are ordered in their pre-1987 form. I've already mentioned that I prefer the 1987 ordering of things, though the 1997 version isn't bad either.

    Compared to the first act, the second one has much fewer changes. The first one comes not until the "First Attack" sequence. Before 1997, this was the students' response to their first victory:

    (LESGLES)

    See how they run away

    (GRANTAIRE)

    By God, we've won the day

    The 1997 libretto changed it to the following:

    (LESGLES)

    See how they turn and run

    (GRANTAIRE)

    And so the war was won

    I admit I prefer the original lyrics to this one. Grantaire's revised lyrics lack the incredulous spirit of the earlier ones, and the almost narrator-esque out-of-the-moment quality to his post-1997 lyrics is grating.

    Later, prior to "Drink with Me", Enjolras speech is slightly changed. Originally he declares:

    We must be ready for the fight

    For the final fight

    Let no one sleep tonight

    The 1997 libretto makes his words as follows:

    We must be ready for the fight

    For tomorrow's fight

    Let no one sleep tonight

    Although "the final fight" has a climactic air that "tomorrow's fight" lacks, I suppose it is more realistic that Enjolras would have no way of knowing whether there will be more to come after the next battle.

    Grantaire's lyrics in "Drink with Me" are edited a bit. Since 1987, this was what he sung:

    Will the world remember you when you fall?

    Can it be your death means nothing at all?

    Is your life just one more lie?

    The 1997 libretto edited it into the following:

    Will the world remember you when you fall?

    Can it be your life means nothing at all?

    Will your death be one more lie?

    Not terrible, but in my opinion the previous lyrics were far more effective. It makes much more sense to me for one's life to be described as a lie than one's death. The original lyric implies that the students' deaths are for nothing, and that their lives are meaningless. I suppose that is still the message of the revised lyrics, but they strike me as a bit obtuse for my taste.

    That's it for the edits in this part (unless you count the official addition of the "You raised my child in love" and "I'll lead you to salvation" variation in the epilogue, which had already been used worldwide for a few years anyway).

    But this did not mark the end of the chapter of the Les Mis saga. As I've mentioned earlier, a few edits were made in later months of 1997. So let's look at:

    1997 Update #2

    The first variation that can be heard in this version occurs during "Lovely Ladies". The "God, i'm weary..." sequence is originally sung in exactly the same tune as the rest of "Lovely Ladies". However, this edit changed it into a slightly different variation of the tune. In my opinion this is a definite improvement. As I mentioned in a previous edition of this blog, while thematically the sick prostitute scene is more fitting than the scene it replaced, it can potentially feel awkward when it's the sole part of the song in its tune not to feature the phrase "lovely ladies". Putting it in a different tune makes its out-of-place vibe feel intentional. In a way, its slightly different sound cements the idea that the prostitute is sick and is not functioning in the same way she ordinarily would.

    The first of a few cuts occurs before "Eponine's Errand". Originally, it begins with a few seconds of instrumentals before Eponine starts singing. However, starting with this edit, Eponine begins singing acapella. Not until her first verse is finished do any instrumentals come in. I slightly prefer the version with instrumentals, but it still works alright.

    The next cut happens during the opening barricade scene to the second act. Originally, Lesgles' "They will do what is right" is followed by a few seconds of instrumentals before Marius sings his "Hey little boy..." line. However, this edit removed those instrumentals, meaning Marius starts right after Lesgles stops singing. Truth be told I've always found that scene boring, so I can't say I object to cutting it down by a few seconds!

    The last cut occurs after "Dawn of Anguish" and before Gavroche's death scene. The "Drink with Me" reprise after the former number originally is followed by an instrumental reprise of the chorus of "Castle on a Cloud". This is then followed by the closing notes to "Drink with Me". However, this edit makes it so that the reprise ends quickly, going right to the ending notes of "Drink with Me" without any "Castle on a Cloud" chords. I definitely prefer the original; it feels so much more emotional and reflective. I've been told it also holds some context to the original book of Les Miserables, though I don't know much more given that I have not yet read the book.

    That just about sums this part up! If I missed anything feel free to let me know, as my goal is to create a changelog as thorough and complete as possible. I plan on making more parts in the near future covering all the changes that have been made in the show up until this day (discounting concerts). Any feedback and constructive criticism is very much appreciated.

    As a side note, both for this project and my own enjoyment, I want as complete a collection of Les Miserables audios as possible. I already have most of what’s commonly circulated, but if you have any audios or videos you know are rare, I’d love it if you DMed me!

    Until the turntable puts me at the forefront again, good-bye…

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  • astoryinred
    22.07.2021 - 1 day ago

    Chapter 112: In which Enjolras has to go through a deceased man's effects for a clue.

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  • croissantslut4
    21.07.2021 - 2 days ago

    Flower.

    Eponine holding a flower

    i wanted to join the challenge jeje sorry for the bad quality of my phone. today it’s week 1

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  • javerts-truncheon
    20.07.2021 - 3 days ago

    𝔗𝔥𝔢 ℭ𝔬𝔲𝔯𝔱 𝔬𝔣 𝔐𝔦𝔯𝔞𝔠𝔩𝔢𝔰 𝔉𝔞𝔫 ℭ𝔞𝔰𝔱𝔦𝔫𝔤 𝔓𝔞𝔯𝔱 1

    Kester Grant's reimagining of Les Miserables as a young adult novel is spunky, glamorous and at times shockingly violent. The novel also boasts a large cast of original characters, but I tried to stick to the more recognizable ones in my re-casting. If you're interested in a fresh, fast-paced and diverse take on Victor Hugo's classic novel, definitely check it out!
    Lyna Khoudri as Eponine (Nina): Described as 'sharp, small' and decidedly 'unpretty' Nina is the poster child of a YA protagonist. Miss Khoudri's more obscure beauty and fragile, willowy appearance are a good match for the role, and would serve as a brilliant disguise in Nina's gritty profession. Furthermore, Khoudri is of French-Algerian descent, falling in line with the book's description of our heroine.
    Leila Bekhti as Azelma: Nina's older sister. In contrast to the protagonist, Azelma is described as soft and beautiful. Tragically selfless in her endeavors, Azelma is rarely mentioned and mostly serves as a plot instigator. Ms. Bekhti's French-Algerian ancestry and unique beauty overshadow the fact that she's probably a little too old for this role, nearing forty while the character is presumably in her mid-twenties.
    Pierre Deporte as Enjorlas (St. Juste): I was hard-pressed to find an actor that rose to Kester Grant's lofty bar of 'marble-featured young god', but French actor and model Pierre Deporte's ethereal beauty is a perfect match for the role. Furthermore, he's best known for starring in K-drama, and Enjorlas enjoys an enthusiastic East-Asian fanbase.
    Louis Garrel as Grantaire: I know, Grantaire is supposed to be unattractive (which Mr. Garrel is decidedly not) but his scruffy, laid-back demeanor paired with those unkempt curls proved irresistible to me. I can certainly see this portrayal as the fun, flirtatious revolutionary described by Ms. Grant.
    Kad Merad as Monsieur Thenardier: Described as silver-tongued and unbelievably cruel, this iteration of Thenardier garners no respect from his daughters. Like Azelma and Nina, I envisioned a French-Algerian actor in the role.
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  • incorrecteponine
    20.07.2021 - 3 days ago

    Eponine: As my mom always used to say, “if a cop handcuffs you to a bike rack there’s always something you can gnaw through.”

    Cosette: Your mom... always... said that?

    #source: the good place #Eponine Thenardier#Cosette#eposette#Les Miserables#les mis #incorrect les mis quotes
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  • valntynebaby
    19.07.2021 - 5 days ago

    Montparnasse knows how to get away with murder

    is this canon? maybe

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  • bori-tea
    18.07.2021 - 6 days ago

    the meant-to-be barricade day post but here we are in july

    it was actually really fun drawing period clothing i need to do this more

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  • miserablesme
    18.07.2021 - 6 days ago

    The Les Miserables Changelog Part 7: 1987-1997 American variations

    Hello, everyone! This is the latest edition in my attempt to chronicle all of the musical and lyrical changes which the show Les Miserables has undergone over the years. This time, we're going through the production-specific differences between the official 1987-1997 libretto and the US tour and Broadway productions of the era.

    Compared to the West End production, American ones took far fewer liberties relative to what was in the libretto. For the most part, they stuck with what they were told to do. This makes the variations that did crop up all the more fascinating, and I think they are absolutely worthy of a post. Without further ado, let's get started!

    Second National Tour

    1988-1991

    To the best of my knowledge, this is the first US production to feature any variation from the 1987 libretto. The only one I'm aware of: the original "Got a number on his chest" becomes "Got a brand upon his chest" prior to "The Attack of Rue Plumet". This would later be applied to other productions after the costumes were slightly tweaked so that Valjean now has a generic bar on his chest instead of the number "24601". Similarly, it seems as though this production may not have had the normal number for some reason?

    Broadway and Third National Tour

    Everything from this point downwards refers to these two productions, which seem to have been very much connected as they tended to make the same changes around the same times.

    Circa 1988-1989 version

    During the "On Parole" segment of the prologue, as Valjean takes his flight a voice can be heard shouting "Stop that man!" I suppose it makes sense that someone would send an alert about his presence, though it sort of distracts from Valjean's high note.

    Much like the West End production at the time, these production changed the order of lines in "At the End of the Day". Usually the lines go as follows:

    What is this fighting all about?

    Will someone tear these two apart?

    These productions instead put them in the following order during this timeframe:

    Will someone tear these two apart?

    What is this fighting all about?

    I honestly have no clue what exactly is the purpose of swapping those two lines; nothing seems changed at all in spirit or meaning.

    After "Red and Black", Gavroche now whistles prior to announcing General Lamarque's death.

    That's literally it... everything else sticks to the libretto.

    Circa 1989-1991 version

    This is almost identical to the preceding version. One difference: a little joke has been added to the "Waltz of Treachery". Instead of just singing "Let's not haggle for darling Cosette", Thenardier pauses for quite some time, singing: "Let's not haggle for darling... Cosette".

    Circa 1991-1994 version

    "At the End of the Day" is now in its official format. However, the "Stop that man" line, Gavroche's whistle, and Thenardier's forgetfulness are all still present.

    Circa 1994-1997 version

    This is the first time these productions actually diverge from the libretto to a significant extent. The "Stop that man" line is still present in the prologue.

    A more substantial difference, which draws on the 1992 UK tour and then-current West End variations, can be heard in "The Runaway Cart". Officially these were the lyrics spoken by townspeople:

    Look at that

    Look at that

    It's Monsieur Fauchelevent

    Don't approach

    Don't go near

    At the risk of your life

    He is caught by the wheel

    Oh the pitiful man

    Stay away

    Turn away

    There is nothing to do

    There is nothing to do

    This was the UK tour variant:

    Look at that

    Stay away

    You'll be crushed by the cart

    Don't approach

    Don't go near

    It'll fall on you too

    Oh my god, who is that?

    It's Monsieur Fauchelevent

    He is caught by the wheel

    Oh the pitiful man

    There is nothing to do

    The US productions at this point almost used those lyrics:

    Look at that

    Stay away

    You'll be crushed by the cart

    Don't approach

    Don't go near

    At the risk of your life

    Oh my god, who is that?

    It's Monsieur Fauchelevent

    He is caught by the wheel

    Oh the pitiful man

    There is nothing to do

    Interestingly, the lyrics are identical to their revised form except that the original "At the risk of your life" is maintained instead of "It'll fall on you too". Perhaps the producers thought the scene was more suspenseful without a rhyme scheme?

    Regardless, the remainder of the number plays out as was in the libretto, not using the UK tour and West End variants.

    Thenardier continues to forget Cosette's name during the "Waltz of Treachery".

    Now, prior to "Red and Black" the little sting introduced in the UK tour (and soon added to foreign language productions) is also audible in US productions. To quote myself from Part 5 of this blog:

    "If I’m not mistaken, this musical addition was placed in to account for a change in staging. Originally the number began with the barricade set sliding off-stage, revealing the ABC cafe set behind it. However, around the time of this tour the blocking was adjusted. Now, the turntable instead revolved at the beginning of this number, revealing the ABC cafe set on the other end of the turntable and allowing the barricade set to double as the walls of the cafe. I believe the opening sting was added to allow time for this slightly more elaborate staging."

    Gavroche no longer whistles before announcing General Lamarque's death.

    Calling on the UK tour and West End production, after "Night of Anguish" the instrumental "Drink with Me" tune has been removed. In its place, instrumentals of "A Little Fall of Rain" have been put in, as they already had been in the UK tour and the West End production.

    Everything goes as expected right up until the epilogue. Officially, the libretto said "You raised my child with love", but like the Australian and UK tours and the West End production the US ones changed this to "in love".

    Similarly, the official "And lead me to salvation" was replaced with "I'll lead you to salvation", which had already been used in the aforementioned tours.

    Circa 1997 version

    This version (which was seemingly only used for a few months, if even that long) is almost identical to the previous one, with one significant difference. Drawing on the UK tour and the West End production, a sequence in "Lovely Ladies" was totally redone. Instead of the official libretto scene between sailors and prostitutes:

    (SAILORS - simultaneously with prostitutes' lines)

    Lovely lady, fastest on the street

    Wasn't there three minutes

    She was back up on her feet

    Lovely lady, what you waiting for

    Doesn't take a lot of savvy just to be a whore

    Come on lady, what's a lady for?

    (PROSTITUTES - simultaneously with sailors' lines)

    Lovely ladies, lovely little girls

    Lovely ladies, lovely little ladies

    Lovely girlies, lovely little girls

    We are lovely, lovely girls

    Lovely ladies, what's a lady for?

    There's this exchange between a prostitute and a pimp:

    (PROSTITUTE)

    God I'm weary, sick enough to drop

    Belly burns like fire

    Will the bleeding ever stop?

    (PIMP)

    Cheer up dearie, show a happy face

    Plenty more like you here

    If you can't keep up the pace

    (PROSTITUTE)

    Only joking, dearie knows her place

    Side note: I only have evidence of this variant being used on the Broadway show, from January 1997. I have no idea if it was ever used in the US tour; the latest audio of the tour pre-official libretto change that I have is from December 1996, and it still uses the original lyrics.

    And... that's it. See what I mean when I say the American productions didn't diverge that much from the libretto?

    That just about sums this part up! If I missed anything feel free to let me know, as my goal is to create a changelog as thorough and complete as possible. I plan on making more parts in the near future covering all the changes that have been made in the show up until this day (discounting concerts). Any feedback and constructive criticism is very much appreciated.

    As a side note, both for this project and my own enjoyment, I want as complete a collection of Les Miserables audios as possible. I already have most of what’s commonly circulated, but if you have any audios or videos you know are rare, I’d love it if you DMed me!

    Until the turntable puts me at the forefront again, good-bye…

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  • andromedaa-starss
    17.07.2021 - 6 days ago

    whoever decided to reduce cosette's character and motivations in the musical is getting these fists

    #les mis#les misérables#cosette #at this point she could be classified as a minor character within the musical #despite being the one that kinda helps tie the story together #or so ive heard #anyways musical!cosette is fine and all but she is about as interesting as drying paint #no wonder people flock to eponine and also marius/eponine #eponine's got way more character #although she's also been kinda reduced but that's not rlly the point here #BASICALLY the women of les mis have been shafted #but especially cosette #nova speaks
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  • mariusslonelysoul
    17.07.2021 - 1 week ago

    I got a notif on an old post i'd actually forgotten i'd even made, so naturally i went to look at it, and then scrolling down i found i had once upon a time reblogged this:

    Now here's the thing, this was like three years ago, and i'm pretty sure i only did it bc of lizzie and darcy bc i didn't know most of these characters back then any way, but jESUS. Not trying to hate on anyone if you ship these, but tony and nat?? Clarice and hannibal?? (Just, hannibal with ANYONE in anything other than the tv show seems wrong, and even in the show is quite fucked up) P*tyr and sansa?! Belle and fking rumplestilskin?! epONINE AND ENJOLRAS?!!

    Again, if you ship these, good for you i guess, but christ, i would have never reblogged this now

    #specially the last one if it wasn't obvious by the caps #legit the one eponine ship i can't understand #also not showing the blog's name just in case #ships#otp#reblog#the avengers#notp #game of thrones #les mis #silence of the lambs #once upon a time
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  • nightingaleblu
    17.07.2021 - 1 week ago

    Young Eponine and Azelma Thenardeir

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  • quotesfromthebrick
    16.07.2021 - 1 week ago
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  • miserablesme
    15.07.2021 - 1 week ago

    The Les Miserables Changelog Part 6: 1987-1997 West End variations

    Hello, everyone! This is the latest edition in my attempt to chronicle all of the musical and lyrical changes which the show Les Miserables has undergone over the years. This time, we're going through the production-specific differences between the official 1987-1997 libretto and the West End productions of the era.

    Compared to American productions, the West End production was NOT afraid to improvise a little relative to what the books said. It was simultaneously willing to hold on to things the official libretto abandoned, and to add in details not done elsewhere. (Incidentally this reportedly was true with the staging as well as the lyrics, though this blog is focused on the latter.)

    It’s worth noting that the show went through many iterations throughout the decade. For the sake of coherence I’m separating this post into each variant.

    Oh, and because this entails many different versions of the musical, and most of these lyrical changes can be seen and discussed in other posts of my blog, this post will be significantly less thorough than most of mine regarding my thoughts on the changes. With all that cleared up, let us begin!

    Circa 1987-1988 variant

    During “On Parole”, the official lyrics of the innkeepers have since 1987 been:

    My rooms are full

    And I’ve no supper to spare

    I’d like to help a stranger

    All we want is to be fair

    The West End production maintained the original version instead:

    My rooms are full

    And I’ve no supper to spare

    I’d like to help you really

    All I want is to be fair

    "At the End of the Day" reverses a line. Officially Valjean usually sings:

    What is this fighting all about?

    Will someone tear these two apart?

    Instead, the West End show has him ask:

    Will someone tear these two apart?

    What is this fighting all about?

    The 1987 libretto had these (solo) lyrics to “The Runaway Cart”:

    Don’t go near him, Monsieur Mayor

    The load is as heavy as hell

    The old man is a goner for sure

    It will kill you as well

    The West End version used the original ensemble sequence instead:

    (INDIVIDUAL)

    Don’t go near him, Monsieur Mayor

    There’s nothing at all you can do

    (ENSEMBLE)

    The old man is a goner for sure

    Leave him alone

    “Who Am I?” still used the original “This innocent who bears my face” instead of “who wears my face”. It also still featured Valjean’s “You know where to find me!” declaration officially written out of the libretto.

    Prior to "Master of the House", a customer still declares "Hell, what a wine" instead of the revised "God, what a wine".

    In the “Waltz of Treachery”, Thenardier still asks “Have we done for your child what is best?” instead of the official post-Broadway line which changes “your child” to “her child”. Additionally, Valjean still sings "a friendlier sky" instead of "some friendlier sky".

    Then, at the end of the number, at least some performances use a slightly different line from the norm. Usually Little Cosette asks:

    Will there be children

    And castles to see?

    However, this era of the West End production used a version later borrowed by the Official Symphonic Soundtrack as well as the 1992 UK tour:

    Will there be castles

    And children to see?

    I can’t help but wonder what this edit was supposed to accomplish. Is it supposed to show that Cosette is optimistic and innocent enough to prioritize castles over making friends?

    The opening of "Look Down" interestingly used a middle ground between Gavroche's original and rewritten lines. Originally he declares:

    This is my school, my high society

    From St. Denis to St Michel

    We live on crumbs of humble piety

    Tough on the teeth, but what the hell?

    If you're poor, if you're free

    Follow me, follow me!

    Officially in the 1987 libretto, he instead proclaims:

    This is my school, my high society

    Here in the slums of St Michel

    We live on crumbs of humble piety

    Tough on the teeth, but what the hell?

    Think you're poor? Think you're free?

    Follow me, follow me!

    However, the West End production at the time has him sing:

    This is my school, my high society

    Here in the slums of St Michel

    We live on crumbs of humble piety

    Tough on the teeth, but what the hell?

    If you're poor, if you're free

    Follow me, follow me!

    The revised opener combined with the original closing part! A fascinating combination in my book.

    As in the original version, the Beggar Woman cries "You give 'em all the pox" instead of just "Give 'em all the pox".

    The 1987 libretto featured the following exchange as an ensemble piece:

    When's it gonna end?

    When're we gonna live?

    Something's gotta happen now or

    Something's gotta give

    However, the West End production used the original solo lines:

    When's it gonna end?

    When're we gonna live?

    Something's gotta happen, dearie

    Something's gotta give

    Fortunately, the generic students' lines have been replaced with Marius and Enjolras as usual. However, the beggars' lines in between their dialog is in its original form. Instead of the revised lines:

    (BEGGARS)

    See our children fed

    Help us in our shame

    Something for a crust of bread in Holy Jesus' name

    (SOLO BEGGAR)

    In the Lord's holy name

    (BEGGARS)

    In His name, in His name, in His name

    The original ones are used:

    (BEGGARS)

    Something for a meal

    Something for a doss

    Something in the name of Him who died upon the cross

    On the cross, come across

    On the cross, come across, come across

    "The Robbery" has mostly been adapted into its revised Broadway form, with one small difference. Instead of the following revised part of Thenardier's dialog:

    Save a life, spare a sou

    God rewards all the good that you do

    He instead sings the following:

    Save a life, spare a sou

    God will see all the good that you do

    This is presumably a relic of the number's pre-Broadway form, in which Thenardier's plea includes the line:

    How d'you do? Spare a sou

    God will see all the good that you do

    I kind of like this unique variant actually. It strikes me as a little more authentic regarding what an actual religious person would say. My experience is that the omniscience of God seems to be a higher priority in most devout Christians' minds than the ways he will reward them. Of course, Thenardier is just putting on an act and he himself prioritizes nothing before reward, so perhaps the standard lines make more sense.

    For some inexplicable reason, Javert's "Why on earth did he run?" later in "The Robbery" is instead sung as "Why the hell did he run?" This feels extremely out-of-character; Javert is usually not one to use Biblical terms casually.

    "Stars" mostly takes on its usual post-Broadway form, with one difference. Instead of singing:

    He knows his way in the dark

    But mine is the way of the Lord

    And those who follow the path of the righteous shall have their reward

    He removes the final conjunction, making the lyric:

    He knows his way in the dark

    But mine is the way of the Lord

    Those who follow the path of the righteous shall have their reward

    Ironically, I find the original "but" a little awkward while thinking the "and" is better when present! Not a huge deal though.

    During "Red and Black", Grantaire still sings "We talk of battles to be won" instead of the slightly revised "You talk of battles to be won".

    "The Attack on Rue Plumet" uses the slightly different original "to watch a cat and his father" line instead of the official "to see a cat and his father".

    Then, at the climax of the number, instead of the revised sequence of lines:

    You wait my girl, you'll rue this night

    I'll make you scream, you'll scream alright!

    Leave her to me, don't wait around

    Make for the sewers, go underground

    The original sequence was used:

    Make for the sewers, don't wait around

    Leave her to me, go underground

    You wait my girl, you'll rue this night

    I'll make you scream, you'll scream alright!

    During "One Day More", Javert sings the original "One day more to revolution" instead of "One more day to revolution" as is standard.

    In the opener to Act Two, Grantaire sings the pre-Broadway "Some will bark, some will bite" from the pre-Broadway show instead of the revised "Dogs will bark, fleas will bite".

    After "Little People", Grantaire similarly keeps his original "Better far to die a schoolboy than a p'liceman and a spy instead of the post-Broadway "What's the difference? Die a schoolboy, die a p'liceman, die a spy".

    The Second Attack retains a lot of pre-Broadway lines. Instead of this post-Broadway opening:

    (ENJOLRAS)

    How do we stand? Feuilly make your report

    (FEUILLY)

    We've guns enough but ammunition short

    (MARIUS)

    I will go into the street

    There are bodies all around

    Ammunition to be had

    Lots of bullets to be found

    The original one is used:

    (ENJOLRAS)

    How do we stand? Feuilly make your report

    (FEUILLY)

    We've guns enough but bullets running short

    (MARIUS)

    Let me go into the street

    There are bodies all around

    Ammunition to be had

    Lots of bullets to be found

    Then, instead of this post-Broadway sequence:

    (ENJOLRAS)

    I can't let you go, it's too much of a chance

    (MARIUS)

    And the same is true for any man here

    (VALJEAN)

    Let me go, he's no more than a boy

    I am old, I have nothing to fear

    The pre-Broadway one is used:

    (ENJOLRAS)

    I can't let you go, it's too much of a chance

    (MARIUS)

    And the same can be said for any man here

    (VALJEAN)

    Let me go in his place, he's no more than a boy

    I am old and alone and have nothing to fear

    The remainder of the scene is performed in its usual post-Broadway form.

    The "Final Battle" number uses the more hectic original pace as opposed to the less wordy post-Broadway lyrics. Instead of these current lyrics:

    (ENJOLRAS)

    Let us die facing our foes

    Make them bleed while they can

    (COMBEFERRE)

    Make them pay through the nose

    (COURFEYRAC)

    Make them pay for every man

    A slight variation on the original lyrics is used:

    (ENJOLRAS)

    Come on my friends, though we stand here alone

    Let us go to our deaths with our face to the foes

    (COMBEFERRE)

    Let 'em pay for each death with a death of their own

    (COURFEYRAC)

    If they get me, by God, they will pay through the nose

    Notice how the line now uses "the foes" instead of the original "our foes". Everything else is consistent with the original sequence, though.

    "Dog Eats Dog" is mostly the same as its post-Broadway revision. However, Thenardier still sings "Here's a little toy" instead of the revised "Here's another toy". From this point onwards, the musical takes its standard post-Broadway form.

    Circa 1988-1989 variant

    This version is almost identical to the last, with a couple exceptions. During "Who Am I?" Valjean now sings the official "wears my face" line as opposed to the original "bears my face" lyric.

    The post-"Waltz of Treachery" scene is now performed in its standard "children and castles" format instead of the "castles and children" variant.

    "Stars" now borrows a line from its Australian version. Instead of "And so it has been, and so it is written", Javert now sings "And so it must be, for so it is written". Interestingly, though, the rest of the number is the same as it was in the 1987-1988 version of the West End show.

    In "One Day More", Javert finally sings the post-Broadway "One more day to revolution" instead of "One day more to revolution".

    Circa 1989-1991 variant

    This version of the show is mostly a mix of the 1987-1989 variants as well as the official post-Broadway libretto, with a few unique variations added in. The innkeeper scene retains its pre-Broadway form, and "At the End of the Day" retains its swapped-lines variants.

    "The Runaway Cart" now uses its standard post-Broadway lyrics. However, the lines "The load is as heavy as hell" and "It will kill you as well" are performed as ensemble pieces instead of the scripted solo lines.

    "Who Am I?" retains Valjean's "You know where to find me" line... usually. I also have one 1989 recording where Peter Karrie uses the Australian "You will find me at the hospital St. John" line... yet Karrie himself can also be heard stating the usual line in other performances. Very odd...

    The "Hell, what a line" original lyric is still sing during the preamble to "Master of the House".

    Thenardier still sings "your child" instead of "her child" during the "Waltz of Treachery".

    Gavroche's opening to "Look Down", the Beggar Woman's "Give 'em all the pox", and the beggars' "See our children fed" lyrics have all finally been adapted into their official post-Broadway selves. However, the "When's it gonna end" sequence retains its pre-Broadway form.

    "The Robbery" maintains the unique "God will see all the good that you do" variation. However, Javert's "Why the hell did he run?" has fortunately been reverted to "Why on earth did he run?"

    "Stars" has now fully adapted into its Australian format. Instead of the original "Fallen from grace, fallen from grace" Javert now sings "Fallen from God, fallen from grace". The "but" has also been removed from "Mine is the way of the Lord".

    "Red and Black" now uses the official "you talk of battles" line.

    "The Attack on Rue Plumet" retains all of its pre-Broadway variations.

    In "One Day More", Javert now sings "I will join these little schoolboys" instead of "We'll be ready for these schoolboys".

    The opening barricade scene in Act Two has now switched to the official post-Broadway "Dogs will bark, fleas will bite" lyrics.

    Grantaire's post-"Little People" line now takes its post-Broadway "What's the difference?" format.

    The "Second Attack", the "Final Battle", and "Dog Eats Dog" are all performed identically to the 1987-1989 West End versions.

    Circa 1991-1992 variant

    This is very close to the 1989-1991 version, with a few differences. The "Waltz of Treachery" finally has Thenardier say "her child" instead of "your child".

    The "Final Battle" now uses the official post-Broadway lyrics.

    "Dog Eats Dog" finally uses the official "Here's another toy" line instead of "Here's a little toy".

    Moreover, the Epilogue now uses the Australian "you raised my child in love" and "I'll lead you to salvation" lines instead of the original (and still official at that point) "you raised my child with love" and "And lead me to salvation".

    Circa 1992-1993 variant

    This variant is similarly very close to the 1991-1992 one, with the following exceptions. "At the End of the Day" finally uses its official lyrics.

    Valjean no longer declares "You know where to find me!" after "Who Am I?"

    Then, "A Little Fall of Rain" takes a cue from the 1992 UK tour. It now opens with the same annoying interlude as opposed to the usual opening music.

    Later, in another acknowledgement of the UK tour, after "Night of Anguish" instrumentals of "A Little Fall of Rain" as opposed to "Drink with Me" play.

    Gavroche's death scene now uses the "ammunition short" and "I will go into the street" lines instead of the original ones. However, the rest of the number is still in its pre-Broadway state.

    Circa 1993-1994 variant

    This version borrows elements from the 1992 UK tour while still keeping a lot of features of previous West End versions.

    The innkeeper scene still takes its pre-Broadway form.

    "Fantine's Arrest" has put in Fantine's slightly awkward "I won't have you" line from the UK tour in place of her usual "No, not at all". Some performances also switch Bamatabois' original lyrics:

    You've got some nerve, you little whore

    You've got some gall!

    It's the same with a tart as it is with a grocer

    The customer sees what he gets in advance

    It's not for the whore to say "yes sir" or "no sir"

    It's not for the harlot to pick or to choose

    Or to lead me a dance

    Into his UK tour lines:

    You've got some sauce, you ugly slut

    You've got some gall!

    What's become of the world when a whore from the gutter

    Can suddenly get such ideas in her head?

    Your job is to lie on your back for your betters

    This hideous harlot believes she can choose

    Who she takes to her bed

    However, this didn't seem to be the standard at this point. Many performances still used the original lyrics.

    "The Runaway Cart" has been entirely redone so that it takes its UK tour format. Instead of these original opening remarks:

    Look at that

    Look at that

    It's Monsieur Fauchelevent

    Don't approach

    Don't go near

    At the risk of your life

    He is caught by the wheel

    Oh the pitiful man

    Stay away

    Turn away

    There is nothing to do

    There is nothing to do

    The UK tour ones are used:

    Look at that

    Stay away

    You'll be crushed by the cart

    Don't approach

    Don't go near

    It'll fall on you too

    Oh my god, who is that?

    It's Monsieur Fauchelevent

    He is caught by the wheel

    Oh the pitiful man

    There is nothing to do

    As in the past in the West End, the solo lines in the "Don't go near him..." sequence become ensemble ones.

    Finally, Fauchelevent's original "You come from God, you are a saint" takes its UK tour "You saved my life, you come from God" form.

    "Look Down" still uses the pre-Broadway "When's it gonna end..." sequence.

    In "The Robbery", Thenardier also still claims "God will see..." instead of "God rewards...".

    As with past variations in the West End, "Stars" takes its Australian/UK tour form.

    Interestingly, despite all the UK tour adaptations which were being added to the West End show, the opening sting prior to "Red and Black" is not heard (despite the fact that during this era, it was being added to more or less every other replica production worldwide!)

    However, Enjolras' line:

    To rally the people

    To call them to arms

    To bring them in line

    Is replaced with the UK tour version:

    To rally the people

    To fire their blood

    And the bring them in line

    Also, the rewritten lyrics to "Lamarque is Dead" do appear.

    The pre-Broadway lyrics in "The Attack on Rue Plumet" are still present.

    Javert continues to sing "I will join these little schoolboys" in "One Day More".

    As was the case in the last edit, "A Little Fall of Rain" and "Night of Anguish" use the musical variants introduced in the UK tour.

    Gavroche's death scene is finally in its official post-Broadway form 100% of the way through. After this point in the show, everything is identical to the 1991-1993 show.

    Circa 1994-1995 variant

    This is almost identical to the 1993-1994 version of the show. The one difference I'm aware of: Thenardier finally sings "God rewards..." instead of "God will see..." in "The Robbery".

    Circa 1995-1996 variant

    A few differences are present here relative to the 1994-1995 version. First off, "Lovely Ladies" takes a cue from the UK tour. Instead of this group scene:

    (SAILORS - simultaneously with prostitutes' lines)

    Lovely lady, fastest on the street

    Wasn't there three minutes

    She was back up on her feet

    Lovely lady, what you waiting for

    Doesn't take a lot of savvy just to be a whore

    Come on lady, what's a lady for?

    (PROSTITUTES - simultaneously with sailors' lines)

    Lovely ladies, lovely little girls

    Lovely ladies, lovely little ladies

    Lovely girlies, lovely little girls

    We are lovely, lovely girls

    Lovely ladies, what's a lady for?

    There's this exchange between a prostitute and a pimp:

    (PROSTITUTE)

    God I'm weary, sick enough to drop

    Belly burns like fire

    Will the bleeding ever stop?

    (PIMP)

    Cheer up dearie, show a happy face

    Plenty more like you here

    If you can't keep up the pace

    (PROSTITUTE)

    Only joking, dearie knows her place

    Note that this is NOT identical to the UK tour version. The prostitute sings "will the bleeding ever stop" instead of "never stop", and the pimp refers to "you here" instead of "you, dear".

    "Fantine's Arrest" now has solidified the UK tour lyrics as the default ones; the original lyrics seem to no longer be used in the UK.

    In the "Waltz of Treachery", Thenardier no longer just sings "Let's not haggle for darling Cosette". No he refers to "darling Colette", with Mme. Thenardier quickly saying (not singing) her actual name and Thenardier singing it in response. I'm not the biggest fan of this joke myself. It makes Thenardier look like nothing more than a big idiot, when I think there should be a degree of cunning to his character.

    Fortunately, the little opening overture before “A Little Fall of Rain” has once again been removed. Everything else is the same as the last version (and yes, that includes the original pre-Broadway lines that haven't yet been converted to their rewritten forms!)

    Circa 1997 variant

    This version is almost identical to the last one. However, Javert is back to singing "We'll be ready for these schoolboys" instead of "I will join these little schoolboys" in "One Day More".

    An interesting change also occurs during the "Final Battle". Though the lines are the same, Enjolras now sings the final word, "free", instead of shouting it.

    And that just about sums this part up! If I missed anything feel free to let me know, as my goal is to create a changelog as thorough and complete as possible. I plan on making more parts in the near future covering all the changes that have been made in the show up until this day (discounting concerts). Any feedback and constructive criticism is very much appreciated.

    As a side note, both for this project and my own enjoyment, I want as complete a collection of Les Miserables audios as possible. I already have most of what’s commonly circulated, but if you have any audios or videos you know are rare, I’d love it if you DMed me!

    Until the turntable puts me at the forefront again, good-bye…

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  • ignisaeri
    15.07.2021 - 1 week ago
    #les mis#les miserables#the miserable#musicals#jean valjean#javert#marius pontmercy#cosette#eponine#fantine #i know eponine's supposed to be evil in the books but in this movie this line made me sob #eddie redmayne
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