#fred astaire Tumblr posts

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  • They Can!t Take That Away from me.flv

    #they can't take that away from me #ginger rogers#fred astaire#musical #cecil gershwin palmer
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  • Fred Astaire & Ginger Rogers (Tap Dance)

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  • Performed by: Fred Astaire and Audrey Hepburn

    Number: “Funny Face”

    Choreographers: Fred Astaire and Eugene Loring

    Style: Broadway

    From: Funny Face (1957)

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    Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers

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  • Astaire Fred Bojangles of Harlem from Swing Time 1936

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  • Dance Class - Swing Time (1936)

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    Funny Face (1957)

    • starring Audrey Hepburn, Fred Astaire, Kay Thompson
    • Book-loving empathicalist Jo Stockton’s simple academic life is brutally interrupted by a chance encounter with Dick Avery, a fashion photographer, who convinces her to become Quality magazine’s new face for a unique collection. The duo travel with the Quality team to Paris, where Jo discovers that her rising feelings for Avery, her dedication to philosophy, and her contract as a model may not come together as easily as she thought.
    • I should preface this review by saying I’m not much for musicals, so it may just be me but I found the music numbers to be, at times, somewhat meaningless and drawn out. Song and dance in film strike me as very emotional scenes, and there was a pretty heavy mix of emotion-laden songs and arbitrary songs. When the characters were genuinely conveying their feelings in a way only singing and dancing can fully portray, I was drawn in and really appreciated the songs, but very often it seemed like they were dancing just to show their abilities as dancers. The first half of the movie felt like it moved far too quickly, and there wasn’t any build-up to the conclusions each character reached; for example, Jo went from being absolutely livid at Dick Avery for ruining her bookstore to singing about how in love she was with him in under a minute, just because he kissed her. I know it’s a product of the time but even for that it felt rushed. The second half was a much more natural progression that I was readily drawn into, and it was easier to see and feel the character development occur. It was certainly romantic throughout the film, but the ending truly felt like real love. 5/10
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    An Inspector Calls (2015)

    • TW: suicide by poison (on screen), rape
    • starring David Thewlis, Sophie Rundle, Ken Stott, Miranda Richardson, Chloe Pirrie, Finn Cole, Kyle Soller
    • Based on J.B. Priestley’s play of the same title, this film investigates an upper class Edwardian family through the lens of Inspector Goole, a mysterious police inspector seeking to uncover the events that led to the death of Eva Smith. The Birlings all have personal ties to Eva in the years leading up to her death, which are uncovered one by one by the meticulous and straightforward inspector in an effort to teach the family about their carelessness and selfishness.
    • This film was quite riveting. Although not exactly cottagecore (I apologize), this period drama built incredible tension without ever leaving the Birlings’ dining room (aside from flashbacks). I found myself gripping a pillow waiting to find out the ending as it all came together. It seems like it would have a straightforward resolution, but just the right amount is left to the audience’s imagination to leave you more satisfied with the ending than if it had all been explained. The film was an excellently portrayed criticism of the brutalities created by the carelessness and ignorance of the upper class, and really placed its finery under harsh examination. The acting was excellent, and seemed to me that each character was played with impeccable emotion and chemistry. 9/10
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    Full Count (2019)

    • TW: suicide (on screen), vehicular manslaughter, police brutality, assault
    • starring John Paul Kakos, Natalia Livingston, Adam Boyer, E. Roger Mitchell, Rick Hearst, Jason London
    • High school athlete Milton Young struggles to pursue his passion for baseball while his time is consumed helping his father take care of the family farm. His talent and dedication pay off when a college scout watches him carry his school to victory at the state championship, and Milton is offered a full scholarship to a competitive school. He’s only there for a short time before tragedy strikes and he’s brought back home to help his family. There, things only get worse for Milton when he’s charged with driving under the influence and striking a woman walking alongside the road; however, he can’t seem to remember any of the events leading up to it. When his family’s farm falls into crisis, and Milton himself can’t take much more, a drifter named David comes into their life and offers to help bring the farm back to life. Amid the struggles with the farm and the criminal charges, David has to come to terms with who he is and who he wants to become, and reexamine his faith along the way.
    • This was a decent movie. I appreciated how it focused on kindness and believing in others, and yourself, above all else. It takes place in a small Georgia town and is strongly centered on Christian faith, but it does so without being overly tacky and unrealistic, which I greatly appreciate. It really emphasized the impact of loving other people, regardless of their circumstances, which I think we need more of in this world. However, I definitely felt like more effort could have been put into the characters; they were rather bland and unrelatable, and while I liked the message of the movie, I didn’t think the characters carried it very well. There’s also a twist at the end that I saw coming from the very beginning, and it’s my most disliked twist that always seems to come into Christian movies: the drifting stranger turns out to be an angel. I always feel like this invalidates the message of love and kindness, since it places this expectation that we’ll always receive blatantly divine payoffs for being kind to others, when we really should just do it for the sake of humanity. Also it’s incredibly cheesy and really just detracts from the seriousness of the rest of the film. 4/10

    Part One // Part Two // Part Three

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  • What are you listening to right now to keep you sane?

    my current comfort blanket in all this is Fred Astaire..

    the last song on this playlist is an instrumental track that played over the advert of an Audrey Hepburn youtube channel after I watched a video from Funny Face and it’s inextricably linked in my head now 🤷🏻‍♀️

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