#french revolution Tumblr posts

  • Lots of writing this week

    So I have done more writing this week then I have Inna long while. Wrote three chapters of my original novel. And wrote two chapters of fanfiction and did six pages of planning for writing.


    I’m very proud of myself. Still haven’t found anyone to help with some costume designs for the four Miraculous hosts for my French Revolution based stories. But I might try and pick up a pencil during my son’s nap and do that. I can’t promise they’ll be any good, but we’ll see.

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  • the first picture is a pathetic parody. the second is an inimitable original xd. well, for example, really the second portrait of Robespierre, or who is it??¿

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  • #Assemblée nationale constituante #Séance Royale #Marquis de Lafayette #King Louis XVI #The French Revolution: From Enlightenment to Tyranny #Ian Davidson#Chapter 3#Revolution Francaise#French Revolution
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  • things could have been different…

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  • Also since I have some good natural light here’s Aurora"s full outfit for once in some good lighting


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    I cant wait to be able to take her to go DO things once I get my car situation taken care of

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  • at first I didn’t understand why Marat was sprawled on the table, and then I read the inscription below🙃

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    #french revolution #la revolution francaise #maximilien robespierre #jean paul marat #thermidor
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  • Decorative plate commemorating the French Revolution, 1790.

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  • I saw a post earlier today of Junot, with a comment about there being no photos of him- so I thought I’d give it a go drawing him for the first time in this new program: Corel Painter.  I am still trying to figure out the program and how the brushes function and interact but after a while I finally got this image together.  I might stick with Clip for the time being but the paint simulation is interesting in this program so I’ll have to experiment with it more.

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    look what i found in olomouc (olmütz)

    #lafayette#hamilton#french revolution#olomouc #idk what else to tag this #my history people
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  • (Théophile et Félicité de Fernig, by Albert Ferdinand Le Dru)

    Félicité & Théophile Fernig - Warrior sisters

    Félicité (1770-1841) and her sister Théophile (1775-1819) Fernig were two sisters who fought in the French army and distinguished themselves during the French Revolutionary Wars.

    Their father, Louis Joseph Fernig, was an Alsatian philosopher and military officer who had been appointed commandant of a National guard detachment in the district of Mortagne  in 1789. The sisters felt their “warlike ardor stirring” and submitted the following official request on June 7 1792:

    “Gentlemen, though our sex is accused of weakness and timidity, although we are excused from the honor of the oath, as well as civic inscription, we nevertheless dare to offer our country our arms and our lives; therefore, we beg you gentlemen, my younger sister and I, not only to register us on the volunteer list of the National guard of our city, but also to take the civil oath, to be faithful to our nation, to the law and to the king to hold with all our strength the constitution of the kingdom. We are happy to pay homage to the Homeland and to share the victory with the brave volunteers and our brothers in arms.”

    22 years old Félicité and 17 years old Théophile fought against the intrusions of the Austrian enemy soldiers, preventing pillage and plundering. They first tried to prevent their father from discovering their secret. The masquerade lasted only for a few days. One night, the sisters fought in an ambush against the enemy. Their father saw them with their sabers and firearms, faces smeared with smoke and lips blackened by bullet cartridges that they tore open with their teeth. After recognizing them, he decided that the should be allowed to fight.

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    (Félicité et Théophile de Fernig, héroïnes, by Frédéric Lix)

    Louis Joseph was proud of his daughters’ exploits. He describes in one of his letters how they, dressed in uniform, led a National guard detachment. The sisters and their father then joined General Dumouriez’s troops. At the battle of Jemappes, on November 6 1792, Théophile shot 2 Hungarian grenadiers and disarmed and “with her own hand” and took prisoner their commanding officer. Meanwhile, Félicité was “in the thickest of the mélée”, rallied Dumouriez’s retreating battalions, charging on the battlefield “holding her bridle in her teeth and with a pistol in each hand”

    Other women fought at Jemappes, such as Pélagie Dulière, a gunner who was named sublieutenant by Dumouriez and was wounded in the leg. Another  was 22 years old Catherine Pochetat, gunner and sublieutenant as well, who distinguished herself by her courage.

    A week later, Félicité cut through the enemy ranks to rejoin her column. She reportedly rescued a Belgian officer who had fallen from his horse and engaged in a sword fight with the Polish cavalry. She shot two of them before escorting the wounded Belgian to a field hospital and returning to Dumouriez. As General de Beurnonville stated that: “The Fernig girls were very capable of killing their men”. Many accounts praise their bravery, calling the sisters “modest and courageous” as well as “intrepid”.

    In April 1793, Dumouriez betrayed the French Republic and joined the Austrian army. Trusting him and accustomed to obeying, the sisters went with him without realizing what was happening. When they realized what Dumouriez had done, they left his side to keep fighting for the Republic. Ir was too late, they were considered as his accomplices and briefly imprisoned before they could join their family again.

    The two sisters then had to leave France. Félicité married Jean-François Vanderwallen, possibly the Belgian officer that she had saved on the battlefield while Théophile chose to stay celibate. The two sisters fought for the right to return to France which they finally obtained in 1801.They nevertheless returned to Brussels where they both died, Théophile in 1819, Félicité in 1841.

    Warrior women of the French Revolution era: 

    Rose-Alexandrine Barreau

    Marie-Angélique Duchemin

    Bibliography:

    Bocquillet Auguste, Félicité et Théophile Fernig, aides-de-camp du général Dumouriez

    Godineau Dominique, “De la guerrière à la citoyenne. Porter les armes pendant l’Ancien Régime et la Révolution française”

    Grant de Pauw Linda, Battle Cries and Lullabies

    Jacotey M. L., Femmes aux armées de 1792 à 1815

    Wheelwright Julie, Sisters in arms, female warriors from antiquity to the new millenium

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  • Finally going to write my French Revolution Ladybug fanfic

    I’ve been saying I was going to do it for such a long time and I’m finally going to sit down and do the planning and researching process. which is mostly just refreshing and dates.


    What I’m asking is is anyone would like to design the four Miraculous characters in this story? or even a single one. I don’t have any time to really draw anymore and would love to get any of my fans for Of God’s and Heroes involved if they’d like to be.

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    #antoine really be like #the weird pop up ad that just appears and messes with your mind #he needs to express his teenage angst in other way now #frev#shitpost#french revolution#history memes#saint-just
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  • His expulsion from the army, his mother’s narrow escape from the guillotine, his own three months in prison, and the general conditions in France and in the army caused Davout to become a bitter opponent of Jacobinism and to have grave doubts about the merits of Republicanism. Jacobinism, in his eyes, became synonymous with the Terror, with corruption in government, and with mismanagement of military affairs. He had little understanding and even less sympathy with the problems facing the central government; he saw only its faults and its errors. Before the Revolution the young nobleman had supported the King, to whom he owed his education. During the early years of the Revolution he had become a republican, accepting the basic principles of liberty and equality. However, the unhappy experiences of 1793-1794 turned him against Jacobinism and, as in the case of so many other Frenchmen, enkindled a deep desire for order without fear and oppression. When General Bonaparte seemed to offer such a government, Davout welcomed it with enthusiasm and became one of the strongest supporters of the imperial dictatorship.

    John G. Gallaher - The Iron Marshal: a Biography of Louis Nicolas Davout.

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    #french revolution #john g. gallaher #the iron marshal: a biography of louis nicolas davout #louis nicolas davout #jacobinism #i can't fault him for that
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  • Decorative pitcher commemorating the French Revolution, 1789.

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  • An illustration depicting Marie Antoinette creating a poisonous potion in order to sicken her son, Louis-Joseph, whom this libelle (and others) claimed ultimately fatally succumbed to her machinations.

    From Vie de Marie-Antoinette d’Autriche, reine de France, femme de Louis XVI, roi des Français; a revolutionary pamphlet published in 1793, after Marie Antoinette’s execution. Via Bibliothèque nationale de France.

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    23-09-2020

    Had an individual consultation with one of my professors to ask some questions and it was really helpful. If there’s one thing that university has taught me it is to not be afraid to ask for help. Most of the time professors are more than happy to help you.

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