#gardencore Tumblr posts

  • a digital drawing of a dark skinned character with deep scars from a rough war, wearing a beautiful long dress and holding a pot with cacti in it. they are non-binary

    Welcome to a new episode of “I’ve been out of touch for so long I keep forgetting to post art” … sorry bros! Anyways, here is one of my favourite pieces I’ve made recently. I really gave it my all on this one

    Character belongs to: @satsumascribbles

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  • for all those who are stuck in a tiny apartment like yours truly, i understand this lockdown can make your thoughts spiral. i can feel myself going back to dark mindsets i’ve been trying and praying to avoid, and it’s a terribly overwhelming feeling.

    🌷 remember to take your meds! it’s funny, but i actually have a hard time remembering to do that while stuck at home, when just a couple of months ago it was as natural as getting ready in the morning.

    🍄 don’t oversleep! i can’t know this about you, but for me oversleeping leads to diving straight into a pool of depression. my bed feels so warm and comfortable in the morning, like a small nest or cocoon i’ve made for myself. and then i fall back into the old habit of “i should just stay in bed, not like i got anything else to do,” and “i can’t wait to go back to sleep”. i found myself saying the latter about five minutes after waking up, which is not a good sign. the only solution i’ve found is making my bed as soon as i get up, to avoid being tempted into going back. also, don’t study in bed: if you want to lie down, use a couch or even the floor. keep your bed separated from your living spaces if you can.

    🦉 also, don’t sleep too little! it’s important to get the right amount of sleep: too much leads to [read above] but no sleep/a few hours of sleep are just as bad. sure, if you suffer from insomnia or other sleep disorders, you can’t just say “go away”, though you’re welcome to try. but if you are a “night owl” like me, you have to at least try during the weekdays. get 7-8 hours of sleep at the very least. i get that during normal times, nighttime is the only moment we get to ourselves, without having to face any expectation, but it’s really bad for our health and right now, we can’t afford that.

    🌿 nap time! an alternative would be a short nap after lunch (1 hour and a half max) but it’s walking on very thin ice. napping can lead back to oversleeping during the day and not sleeping during the night, which we definitely want to avoid.

    🥞 eating! now more than ever, eating is fundamental. we have to be careful not to rely too much on junk food or frozen meals - though i understand not everyone has the luxury of cooking healthy meals every day, thrice a day. If you only have access to junk food/unhealthy food, or aren’t able to cook for yourself, try to keep fruit or veggies in the house for snacks. it’s not much, but it can help a bit, and it can be a small act of self care you can do. if you have someone to help you, ask them to slice up some fruit and have them through the day. (tip: fruit with chili powder tastes  a m a z i n g)

    🍯 eating pt.2! i’ve seen so many videos/posts about people cooking and baking lately, which makes me super happy. it’s no secret i love baking, and it can be so much fun! take this as an opportunity to learn new recipes - look into mediterranean food and thank me later. you can also cook live with your friends/family, if you want. it can be really cool, and it’ll make you feel closer to your loved ones.

    🍓 on a more serious note, if you’ve suffered/suffer from disordered eating, this is even harder on you. people can either end up binging a lot, or seeing this lockdown as an occasion to fast/restrict. please consider looking into recovery, because i promise it’s not going to feel any better when you get to your ideal weight. as long as the mindset stays, it’s not going to be enough. if big meals are scary - and i know they can be - try snacking during the day.

    ☀️ SUN TIME! very important. if you have a balcony, take a chair outside and get some sunlight every day. if you don’t, open your window and read a book or study or just relax like that. it sounds really silly, but the influence sunlight can have on mental health are amazing. the more of that you get, the nicer you’ll feel.

    since this post is long enough, i’m going to leave it here. i know most of this stuff requires some privileges, and i’m well-aware not everyone has them. still, you can take inspiration from this and adapt it to your needs/situation. take care of yourselves, we can get through this.

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  • The blood peach tree has bloomed and it’s the prettiest 🌸🌸🌸 

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    Being doing some art today 🎨💛

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  • HELP!!!!

    Hello! I really want to do a painting for Mother’s Day as a gift for my mom, but I have no ideas. any recommendations or ideas??!! It would be greatly appreciated

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    Originally posted by jrchair98

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    Thinking about last summer in Scotland

    #these were outside an old abandoned house near my flat in Culloden #i used to ride by it on my way home from work #i miss those slow cycles on hazy summer afternoons #cottagecore#gardencore#flowercore#summer #how do i use tags lol #naturecore#scotland#highlands
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    Whisper of the Heart (1995)

    • starring Honna Youko, Takahashi Issei, Kobayashi Keiju, Yamashita Yorie
    • Fourteen year old bookworm Tsukishima Shizuku has a goal of reading 20 books before school starts, but while she’s reading, she realizes that many of her books have the same name written on the library cards: Amasawa Seiji. She begins imagining who he might be, and evolves the idea into her potential prince charming. After school begins, she encounters a cat commuting on the train, and follows him to a quiet antique shop where she meets a kind elderly man, Nishi Shiro. She soon meets Nishi’s grandson, an aspiring violin maker, who she actually had an uncomfortable encounter with at school earlier on. The two of them become friends despite their differences, until Shizuku learns that his name is Amasawa Seiji, shattering her imaginary image of him. Despite her discomfort, they continue to bond and become close friends, even meeting at school, until Seiji has to leave for Italy for school. While he’s away, Shizuku vows to write a story for him to read upon his return, as an effort to become a better person and understand what she wants to do with her life. It’s a race to get her story onto paper before he returns, a race to plan for her future, and a race to understand what her true feelings are for Seiji before it becomes too late.
    • I have never seen a film capture the pure essence of middle schoolers like this one. It showed the discomfort of discovering love as young teenagers in a way that was realistic but wholesome and honest. Also if Shizuku wasn’t exactly how I was as a child I don’t know what to tell you. She had the unbridled determination and complete tunnel vision of a teenager who’s set her mind to something, and no amount of real-world obligations could deter her from her goal. Her imagination ran wild as she translated it to paper, and although she was proud for finishing it she was still unhappy with the ending, as any writer–especially a first time writer–would be on their first draft. The people she loved were real with her but encouraged her throughout, a fantastic representation of how blood family and found family can help form a young person’s character. 9/10
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    Matilda (1996)

    • starring Mara Wilson, Embeth Davidtz, Danny DeVito, Rhea Pearlman, Pam Ferris
    • Matilda is born to grouchy, rude, and dishonest parents, Harry and Zinnia Wormwood. They consistently neglect her as she grows up, so she learns how to care for herself early on. She develops a love for books and learning, and is thrilled when her parents finally allow her to begin school. However, the school she goes to is nothing like how she expected. Principal Trunchbull, a violent and hateful woman, runs the school through brutality and fear. On the other hand, Matilda’s teacher, the gentle and kind Miss Honey, teaches her children to love learning and supports each of them individually, creating a stark contrast of joy in her classroom to the terrifying rest of the school. Over time, Matilda learns that she has some unique powers, and begins using them to protect the people she loves and punish the people who abuse those around them. She creates her own form of justice for those who have never seen repercussions for their actions, and by the end her actions pave the way for a loving home.
    • I’ve watched this movie many times over the years, and I’ve loved it every time. It’s witty, sweet, entertaining, and endearing. The characters are very straightforwardly portrayed, and although they don’t necessarily have complexity, they don’t need it in a film like this. The main story is about Matilda growing and learning that she deserves to be happy despite the suffering she endured, and the film delivers on that perfectly. The characters are enjoyable–even the unlikable ones–and you can’t help but love to see Matilda exact retribution when the system can’t deliver it for her. Despite everything, she is still a kind and clever young girl, just as Miss Honey is a kind and empathetic woman, which are clear messages that I definitely needed as a child, and still smile upon as an adult. It’s a fantastic movie for all ages, and will always be worth the rewatch. 10/10
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    Mansfield Park (1999)

    • TW: detailed depictions of rape, abuse, and other violence toward people of color through drawings; slavery; racist language
    • starring Frances O’Connor, Hannah Taylor Gordon, Johnny Lee Miller, Alessandro Nivola, Embeth Davidtz, Harold Pinter, Victoria Hamilton, James Purefoy
    • Young Fanny Price, at age 10, is sent away from her impoverished family to live with her mother’s family, the Bertram’s, at Mansfield Park. There she meets Edmund, a boy of her own age and similar fascination with storytelling, and the two become best friends over the years. When Fanny reaches adulthood, Sir Thomas Bertrand and his eldest son move to Antigua, where the family maintains a plantation. Upon their departure, a new sibling duo, Henry and Mary Crawford, move into the parsonage nearby. Edmund quickly falls for Mary, and after a short bit of ingracious flirting on Henry’s part to one of Edmund’s sisters, he soon develops feelings for Fanny. When Fanny refuses his advances, however, Sir Thomas sends her back to live with her family, still stricken with poverty. However, Fanny doesn’t remain for long, when a family tragedy strikes Mansfield Park and she’s needed. There, she renews her friendship with Edmund, and several astonishing complications entwine their fates once more.
    • As with any Jane Austen story, I greatly enjoyed the characters. Fanny is incredibly headstrong and outspoken, but always uses it in the effort of kindness. I find Austen heroines to be excellent role models for young women, and that’s not the last time you’ll hear that from me, but this portrayal of the novel was particularly well acted. O’Connor’s portrayal of her is quick-tongued and cutting when she needs to be, but more importantly her voracity for life and love shines through in her acting. I found myself laughing at her witty comebacks to being slighted, and frustrated when her affections are unknowingly spurned time and again. Austen created a very empathetic and spirited character, but O’Connor expanded her into an even more relatable young woman. All of the acting was done very well, and the settings were both cozy and beautiful, even breathtaking at times. 
    • I do want to make a comment regarding the trigger warnings here, given their graphic nature and how they affect my review. While I do feel that the detail depicted and the length of the scene were egregious, especially because they are never brought up again as a topic of contention, the drawings themselves were very realistic to the times. However, they are burned and disregarded in the film, and the character seen committing the abuses (Sir Thomas) does not face any consequences for them. It is a skippable scene (beginning when Fanny is looking through young Tom’s sketchbook), if such violence causes you discomfort. I personally was very disturbed as a person of color, not so much by the drawings themselves, although they were deeply unsettling, but by how Sir Thomas is never held accountable. He decides to stop being a plantation owner and takes up selling tobacco, implying that he no longer participates in slavery, but he doesn’t face any kind of backlash for it, even from his abolitionist family members. He has a happily ever after that he doesn’t deserve, and I know that is more distressing to many of us. As such, I must advise that you gain nothing in particular by watching these scene, and will lose none of the plot by skipping over it. 8/10

    Part One // Part Two // Part Three // Part Four

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    Update on the carrots, peas, and Fred the tomato plant! They had to be moved to bins because my parents want to move again but I don’t know WHEN they want to move, so I’m not gonna chance having to leave Fred or the currently unnamed sprouts here (waiting until they grow a bit bigger to name them but a few look ready to be named) because i worked really hard to grow them and to have to leave them would suck. It’s also protecting my peas from the rolly polly’s that decided they would make great snacks! Which is illegal. So they’ve been replotted and so far (i repotted them yesterday) everything is looking pretty good! No obvious signs of drooping/notf liking where they are, so heres to hoping they take to their new homes well until we move 🍃💚

    Also growing some Sage in my bedroom (waiting for some sprouts now) and I’ll update y'all on them too when they sprout :)

    #freddie the tomato plant! #gardencore#cottagecore #stay at home! #grow a garden
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  • Flower buds everywhere at my apartment. The blueberry has a lot more than last spring and the red lemon is covered in them again, for the third time this year. What’s not so good is that almost all pepper plants have at least one flower bud as well. I was hoping I’d be able o transplant them at the orchard, but since the lockdown is believed to last until the end of May, I think I’m going to grow peppers on the balcony this year. 

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