#jrr tolkien Tumblr posts

  • tearsofkore
    04.12.2021 - 23 minutes ago

    🥺⚔🌱

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  • seithurwena
    04.12.2021 - 2 hours ago

    I spent a very inspiring Saturday ✨😌🎨🖌️

    Watercolor 🖌️✨

    Varda Elentári

    Idril Celebrindal

    Fingon Findekáno

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  • rimurutempest
    04.12.2021 - 5 hours ago

    The Orb: An Unexpected Pondering (1977)

    #wizard pondering orb #the hobbit#lotr#jrrt #jolkien rolkien rolkien tolkien #jrr tolkien #lord of the rings #youre fucking welcome #mine
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  • narmodhel
    04.12.2021 - 5 hours ago
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  • thebookwormdaydreamer
    04.12.2021 - 9 hours ago

    Currently watching The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey and I’m wondering if they cut it into three movies so they can fit in a bunch of flashback battle sequences. The book was like, three hundred pages. I read it three years ago so I don’t remember a lot, maybe I’d give it a reread.

    #lord of the rings #the hobbit #the hobbit movies #jrr tolkien#tolkien#middle earth
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  • seithurwena
    04.12.2021 - 9 hours ago

    Old drawings ✨⛓️🍂 2017 ones

    Melkor's deeds & a view of Númenor and Morgoth's temple 🖤🔥

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  • finisafricae
    04.12.2021 - 11 hours ago

    Though all things must come utterly to an end in time, there are still other fastnesses, and secret ways of escape into the mountains. Hope and memory shall live still in some hidden valley where the grass is green.

    JRR Tolkien, The Return of the King
    #jrr tolkien #the lord of the rings
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  • steff-swims
    04.12.2021 - 19 hours ago
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  • thejedijunkyard
    03.12.2021 - 22 hours ago

    i have a hard time believing it to be a coincidence that tolkien became an orphan at the age of 12 and that frodo baggins also became an orphan at the age of 12

    #coincidence? i think not #jirt#tolkien#hmm#lotr #lord of the rings #frodo baggins#jrrt#jrr tolkien
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  • eldamaranquendi
    03.12.2021 - 1 day ago

    Glorfindel - The golden Flower by  Lysander H.

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  • eldamaranquendi
    03.12.2021 - 1 day ago

    The mirror of Galadriel by SaMo-art

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  • eldamaranquendi
    03.12.2021 - 1 day ago

    Morwen and Turin by SaMo-art

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  • blackswaneuroparedux
    03.12.2021 - 1 day ago

    The news today about "Atomic bombs" is so horrifying one is stunned. The utter folly of these lunatic physicists to consent to do such work for war-purposes: calmly plotting the destruction of the world! Such explosives in men's hands, while their moral and intellectual status is declining, is about as useful as giving out firearms to all inmates of a gaol and then saying that you hope "this will ensure peace" . . . Well we're in God's hands. And He does not look kindly on Babel-builders.

    - J.R.R. Tolkien, The Letters of J.R.R. Tolkien (letter 102)

    Almost 70 years since Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the military, historical and moral implications of the nuclear bomb remain firmly lodged in the public's consciousness. Images of mushroom clouds serve as powerful reminders of the destructive capability that countries armed with nuclear weapons have access to — a capability that continues to play a primary role in shaping the present geopolitical landscape of the world.

    For physicists, the development of the nuclear bomb generally brings up conflicting feelings. On the one hand, physicists played a central role in helping to create it; on the other, they were also among the first to realize its terrifying power. This contradiction is most famously epitomized by Robert Oppenheimer, the scientific director of the Manhattan Project, who, on witnessing the first test of the atomic bomb, the Trinity test, in July 1945, was reminded of a quote from the Hindu scripture Bhagavad Gita: “Now, I am become Death, the destroyer of worlds.”

    In the subsequent years many of the scientists, and especially physicists working on the atom bomb, came to feel the growing sense of disillusionment as they realised their goal; a sense of lost innocence, that knowledge that has been unleashed cannot be 'unknown'.

    Although driven by the US government and associated with Los Alamos, it is also interesting to consider the genesis of industrial-scale nuclear research programmes more broadly. Britain had the lead for a short while in the early 1940s, mostly because of two scientists based there, Rudolf Peierls and Otto Frisch, who first realised that the amount of uranium required to sustain a nuclear chain reaction was roughly five kilograms — far less than previously thought. But after May 1940, they also had a prime minister who had an interest in nuclear technology, in the shape of Winston Churchill. 

    The history of Britain's role in the race to develop the atomic bomb, although little known, has been examined in Graham Farmelo's book, Churchill's Bomb. It’s a great read even if one would take issue with some of his pot shots against Churchill. Churchill was profoundly suspicious of experts – he once told his oculist: "I entirely disagree with your diagnosis." He believed that the boundless ignorance of the plain man was a safer guide than the limited understanding of the specialist, above all the military specialist, from whose dominion, he prayed, "good Lord deliver us".

    But then even Ernest Rutherford, who achieved fame by splitting the atom in 1917, was fallible in his chosen field. He insisted that the "nucleus is a sink, not a source of energy" and that anyone proposing to find power in the transformation of atoms "was talking moonshine". Still, Rutherford (assisted by his "boys" at the Cavendish laboratory in Cambridge, such as James Chadwick, Ernest Walton and John Cockcroft) had a far more sophisticated grasp of nuclear physics than his Oxford counterpart, Frederick Lindemann. Yet Lindemann was the one expert in whom Churchill did have faith, much to the detriment. Farmelo's main charge is that Churchill, as prime minister, relied too exclusively on the Prof for scientific advice, particularly over the crucial matter of the atomic bomb.

    Although the book ultimately paints a picture of diplomatic misunderstandings and missed opportunities on both sides of the Atlantic, in the end it was inevitable that the British atomic bomb project, known as Tube Alloys, would be subsumed into the far larger and more focused Manhattan Project. And although he eventually became intensely preoccupied with easing tensions in the Cold War arms race following the Second World War, there is no question that Churchill was an early and influential champion for government-sponsored science and technology in Britain.

    Be that as it may, British physicists as well as their American and other European colleagues all increasingly recognised the 'original sin' of modern physics is something all physicists have to live with, one way or another.

    However, although by no means the only template for carrying out fundamental research, big science projects such as CERN are now synonymous with international collaboration and achieving a fundamental understanding of nature's inner workings. Perhaps it is a search for atonement, as much as pure curiosity, that now drives these incredible endeavours.

    **13 Sept 1945 file photo shows seven atom bomb scientists looking over a roentgenometer at the site of the test atom bomb explosion. From left, Dr. Kenneth T. Bainbridge, of Harvard University; Dr. Joseph G. Hoffmann, of University of Buffalo; Dr. J. Robert Oppenheimer, of California; Dr. Louis H. Hempelmann, of Washington; Dr. Victor Weisskoff; Dr. Robert F. Bacher, Cornel University; and Dr. Richard W. Dooson, of California.

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  • glorfindelridesagain
    03.12.2021 - 1 day ago

    Bilbo: I can hold the world in the palm of my hands.

    Thorin: Pffff that’s not possible.

    Bilbo: Yes it is.

    Thorin: Then show me.

    Bilbo: *Walks over*

    Bilbo: *Puts his hands on Thorin’s face*

    Thorin, holding back tears: Look I have a reputation.

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  • blackswaneuroparedux
    03.12.2021 - 1 day ago

    One of the candidates had mercifully left one of the pages with no writing on it, which is the best thing that can possibly happen to an examiner, and I wrote on it: ‘In a hole in the ground there lived a hobbit.’ Names always generate a story in my mind: eventually I thought I’d better find out what hobbits were like.

    - J.R.R. Tolkien, The Letters of J.R.R. Tolkien

    The Hobbit was born one summer afternoon, likely in 1930. Tolkien, then a young Oxford professor, sat in his home office correcting examinations of undergraduates.

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  • i-dislike-tomatoes
    03.12.2021 - 1 day ago
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  • elisethewildwolf
    03.12.2021 - 1 day ago
    #middle earth#tolkien #j.r.r. tolkien #jrr tolkien #lord of the rings #the lord of the rings #the lord of the rings imagines #the lord of the rings imagine #aragorn x y/n #aragorn x you #aragorn x reader #aragorn x oc #aragorn elessar #king of gondor #aragorn imagines#aragorn imagine#aragorn fluff#aragorn fanfic#lotr aragorn#aragorn #the fellowship of the ring x reader #the fellowship #the fellowship x reader #the fellowship imagine #lotr x reader #lotr x y/n #lotr x you #the lord of the rings x reader #lord of the rings x reader #the lord of the rings fanfiction
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  • rosetea-artist
    03.12.2021 - 1 day ago

    Home is behind,

    The world ahead.

    And there are many paths to tread

    Through shadow,

    To the edge of night.

    Until the stars are all alight.

    Mist and shadow,

    Cloud and shade,

    All shall fade,

    All shall fade.

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  • space-arsonist
    03.12.2021 - 1 day ago

    Headcanon: Akoth plays a huge part in recruiting new followers for Talion. He knows lots of people and has contacts everywhere, so he's able to gain the right follower for the right situation. He has a habit of getting people out of dangerous situations and those eventually come to him to repay him for his help. Attracted by his reputation, orcs and ologs who have nothing to lose and are desperate to make something of their lives offer Akoth their services. Eventually the number of Uruk-hai recruited by Akoth outgrows the ones brainwashed by a too-Nazgul-like Talion and by the time the Gravewalker is last seen leaving for Minas Morgul, that doesn't cause too much of a stir: their leader, an uruk, is still among them and fights with them.

    #the concept of Talion eventually passing on to Akoth his legacy is dear to my heart #'I entrust you with my dream of a better future for all the people I've come to know and care about' #'it doesn't matter that I won't live to see it fulfilled. it's not about me but about you and all those who will come later' #'give them the chance to live in peace and happiness. the chance we hadn't had' #I should stop projecting onto my silly scenarios and start writing a novel representative of my life like idk. a certain jrr tolkien. #or any other poet/writer from the 20th century #shadow of war #bog #akoth slayer of the dead #oh anyway I got the idea from playing ac brotherhood specifically ezio going around Rome and recruiting madlads fighting guards 1 on 5
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