#la times Tumblr posts

  • Joy on the wing“ - Drew bunch of birds for LA Times Saturday cover. I had approximately 1 week deadline with $500 budget. I LOVEEE drawing small details such as wings, plants, scales so this was my dream job. So fun. I can draw these forever. Also since I researched a lot of these 10 birds, every-time I see it on media or in person, now I have a habit of scream “That’s Scrub Jay !“ or “OMG Mourning Dove!“ haha. The little hard part was compositioning these 10 birds to fit in long rectangle shape but luckily AD Steve Banks took over that part and I just had to deliver individual birds at the end and he made it all worked out :) Thank you Steve ! 

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  • In these trying times, my sourdough starter is a mundane miracle“ - by Bonnie Mccarthy for LA Times. It was short deadline with simple direction, $300 budget job and was little confused what AD were asking for. So I drew more sketches than usual and also asked for reference pic from a friend who’s been baking sourdoughs a lot. I ended loving how it turned out so I’m happy. Thank you AD Steve Banks. 

    After few weeks, they asked me for crop out sourdough itself for another article”What should you do with extra sourdough starter?”. I also provided some textured background to mix and match.  

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  • LA Times “ Questions you should ask before canceling a trip because of coronavirus fears” by Catherine Hamm. Was offered this job with budget of $450. Drew this day before I was heading for Hawaii trip in early March before pandemic got really crazy. I don’t regret not cancelling my trip but now that I’m looking back, I should’ve. Thank you AD Judy Pryor.

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  • I’m getting sick and tired of news outlets pushing their opinion in their narrative. Report facts! Do you know what facts are?! Report them! I hate propaganda! I am trying so hard not to curse in this post. It is incredibly difficult with how upset I am. Propaganda is tearing this country and people apart. It’s divisive, reckless, irresponsible, and hateful. These propagandist machines are disgusting. How hard is it for people to be honest?! The pure dishonesty in the media is disheartening! Shove your opinions wrapped in dishonesty where the sun doesn’t shine. That’s where they belong. With all the other crap you stand for. So I say this politely… go F*** yourself media.

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  • taylor swift x allen j. schaben for the los angeles times, speak now era

    #taylor swift#taylor#swift#speak now #speak now era #taylor swift speak now #ts3 #taylor swift eyes #blue eyes#mood lighting#2010 #taylor swift photoshoot #allen j schaben #la times #los angeles times #ts#swifties#taylorstans
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  • New from Norton and esteemed American novelist Lydia Millet, A Children’s Bible.  Named a Most Anticipated Book of 2020 by Apple Books, Literary Hub, The Millions, and The Week An indelible novel of teenage alienation and adult complacency in an unraveling world. (Read the LA Times review here.)

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  • Dan Levy and Annie Murphy for the Los Angeles Times Emmy Roundtables [x]

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    Il materiale di origine: Oscar Isaac photographed by Michael Nagle for The Times. (17th August, 2018) #myedit

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    Finally, some unbiased journalism.

    #my own posts #la times#twitter
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  • #Sandra Oh #sandra oh is freaking amazing #it's an honor just to be Asian #la times
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  • Sandra Oh noted that even when her ethnicity is not the point of her casting, she tries “to infuse more pieces of me into my character’s ethnicity and cultural background. We carry our culture, we carry our history,” the “Killing Eve” star noted.
    – LA Times, 6/23/20

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    So Patti is doing Yoga With Adriene on YouTube!!!!! I started that exactly a week ago too😆 I highly recommend it!!!!!

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    Well look at this, the “Joshua 2019 Christmas Bear” my friend and I sent to Patti as a gift made it into the LA Times!! Now he’s gonna be a star😆

    And I’m sure he feels very honoured to live in the Man Cave!!!!!! 😎


    Photo credit to Patti’s son Joshua Johnston

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  • With two new series, Martin Freeman reveals hidden layers

    By MICHAEL ORDOÑA

    STAFF WRITER, LA TIMES

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    The Everyman Card has been nice to have in his back pocket; it afforded him entrée to a solid career. But British actor Martin Freeman has others to play, as two very different television projects show.

    “I didn’t go to drama school just to be likable and funny,” he says over a Zoom chat from his London home. “I like having that facility; it’s very useful. But like most actors, I’m greedy. I want to do as much as I can do.”

    The 48-year-old Freeman made his name as the nice young man in the original British “The Office” (think the John Krasinski role), the accidental cosmic tourist in “The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy” and the sensitive porn stand-in in “Love Actually.” Since then, his hits have included the Benedict Cumberbatch-starring “Sherlock” (as Watson), the trilogy of “The Hobbit” (as the hobbit, Bilbo Baggins), the FX series “Fargo” (as Lester Nygaard) and “Captain America: Civil War” and “Black Panther” in the Marvel Cinematic Universe (he says “Panther” director Ryan Coogler has confirmed he’ll be in the sequel).

    And this season, he’s got two television shows available in America: The warts-and-all parenting comedy, “Breeders,” which hit FX in March, and the true-crime miniseries, “A Confession,” available through the BritBox streaming service. He’s not exactly sweet or heroic in either.

    “There are lots of comedies about parenting and family, obviously,” he says of “Breeders,” which he cocreated. “But there weren’t any that I had seen that showed what happens when you lose your temper with your kids, when you actually do that. When you do it for real, you don’t go, ‘I’ve told you a thousand times to stop that …’; at least not in my house, or in anybody’s house, when you scratch away and get to the truth.”

    “I was interested in how far we could go down that line and for it to still be funny and for the characters to still be people you root for. They’re not abusive; they’re not horrible people. They love their kids and are ostensibly a pretty happy, functional family. But within that, we’re showing the underside …. I haven’t seen this tone in this context on television before.”

    The show’s first scene has Freeman’s Paul losing it in front of his kids and not in PG fashion. Freeman says that moment came to him in a dream.

    “It’s pretty much verbatim. I woke up and thought, ‘This is part of a very, very dark comedy.’ The ridiculousness of people trying to talk themselves down from shouting at their kids, to be calm and chilled out … and you can’t fight it. By the time you open the door, you’re screaming obscenities at children.”

    He says unapologetically depicting such moments “was part of our conversations from the start. ‘You have to show this, or there’s really no point in doing it otherwise.’ ”

    In its bones, “Breeders” is a comedy, but there’s serious drama in its marrow as well. Freeman cites some of those very dark turns as his favorite moments on the show, though to discuss them here would be telling. In the same vein, “A Confession” is not your father’s true-crime miniseries — especially if your father is American.

    “That had occurred to me, the difference between the U.S. and the U.K. — it’s a very English telling of the story. There aren’t any big car chases or explosions; no one gets shot. The best American TV is the best in the world, but you guys like a car chase,” he says, smiling.

    The series’ first act, if you will, is a nail-biting hunt after Freeman’s Detective Superintendent Steve Fulcher learns of a young woman’s kidnapping. From there, it becomes an examination of the aftermath. The balance of the drama turns on a failure to observe the equivalent of a suspect’s Miranda rights, with severe consequences.

    “Steve is a very good copper who believes in suspects’ rights and reining in police”, says Freeman, who got to know the real Fulcher in his research. “But he says, ‘If someone can tell me what I should have done instead of the action I took, please tell me.’ He didn’t kick the … out of someone in the back of the squad car or put words into a suspect’s mouth. It was literally not crossing a T and dotting an I of procedure.”

    Freeman’s Fulcher is all business; he almost never loses his cool. The actor shows remarkable restraint, particularly when he must deliver terrible news to family members or when he gets devastating information from a suspect.

    “The director and the writer both said, don’t do that version — slap him around, the actor gets to look good. It’s not true, not in this story, anyway. It’s more mundane than that. It’s the mundanity of it that’s more affecting.

    “That said, there are some breakdowns — when I tell [costar] Imelda Staunton her daughter’s died … you didn’t have to do anything but just be there in that scene. She’s making this animal noise. You have to be a stone to not be affected. It makes your job easier. You have to do less.”

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    Emily Blunt for LA Times 2018

    #emily blunt #la times magazine #la times #los angeles times magazine #los angeles times
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