#lacuna island Tumblr posts

  • rosey-crossing
    21.01.2022 - 3 days ago

    "open your eyes..."

    my breath of the wild/silent princess island isn't quite ready for an updated dream address, but i've been working super hard on it and wanted to share the progress with you! 💖

    check out the updated tour here

    View Full
  • rosey-crossing
    15.01.2022 - 1 week ago

    over the ages, those with the blood of the goddess have visited ancient springs in search of answers and holy powers. some have been successful... others not so much 🍃

    i'm in LOVE with my updated spring of power (which reminds me of skyview spring in skyward sword too) 😍

    View Full
  • rosey-crossing
    14.01.2022 - 1 week ago

    "Hero of Hyrule, chosen by the sword that seals the darkness..."

    i'm absolutely obsessed with my Sacred Grounds Ruins recreation from Breath of the wild! 😍 what's your favourite memory from BotW? 🍃

    View Full
  • rosey-crossing
    31.12.2021 - 3 weeks ago

    happy new year from lacuna! 🎉

    just like that, 2021 is (finally) over and 2022 is here! despite how rough 2021 was, so many wonderful things happened; i started streaming, created an amazing community, made so many new friends, and started creating content that i absolutely love 💖 thank you all so much for supporting me and here's to 2022! 🥂

    lacuna's having its glow up so you can check out its progress on my twitch channel (twitch.tv/chloerosey) and other dream islands on my youtube channel (@/chloerosey)

    View Full
  • rosey-crossing
    27.06.2021 - 6 monts ago

    a quick note to say i'm still alive and working on my island (lacuna), but i've been so busy over these past few months! you can see me play on my island on twitch.tv/chloerosey - usually i stream on wednesdays and fridays but this week i'm streaming on sunday 4th july (7.30pm BST/8.30pm CET/1.30pm CST)

    ily all so much! 💖

    View Full
  • zestymildorp
    30.12.2021 - 3 weeks ago

    Ahklrium - A Brief History Lesson

    I'm currently DMing a campaign that takes place in a homebrew world. Everything from the history to the maps to the smallest of NPC's are things that I've created.

    Let me give you a small overview of the history of the world.

    Welcome to the Realm of Ahklrium!

    The current year is 1622 A.P. ("A.P." stands for "After Peace"). All of the calendars and history books in the world use Peace as the beginning of common era.

    The Realm (and all subsequent Planes of Existence) came to be in the Year of Creation (an unknown time ago). The Realm was created by the Lacuna - the magical fabric of the universe itself. The Lacuna then created Gods to rule over the Planes of Existence. Following this was the Thousand Years of Chaos - as according to some ancient texts, the Gods couldn't figure out how to rule properly. After this Thousand years was the Years of Establishment - a time of roughly 800 or so years where life could begin developing and living in these realms and on these planes. These times are unrecorded aside from religious or ancient texts, but almost all texts deviate and there are no two stories that are alike… aside from the story of how the Gods got their power and how the Lesser Gods, Deities, and Titans were created.

    Peace was the act that some people believe is when “violence was abolished forever”. The idea behind Peace was that the Realm of Ahklrium would come together as one and help each other achieve their goals… This was executed, however, by combining all cultures and peoples under 4 nations (Wor-cresh, Seupesia, Obora and Cranzant - originally, the idea was that there were to be 3 nations, but the excess land couldn’t be easily divided to the other nations, and thus Obora was created.). Some believe that this truly was Peace, and others believe it’s the blackest mark in the history books. There is no one individual who is credited with the idea of Peace, and there's large debates over who it could have been.

    About a few hundred years or so after Peace, there was turmoil amongst the people who had been forcefully assimilated into the 4 nations. This culminated to a head when in 653 A.P the Provincials Uprising. Many of the islands refused to pay taxes, listen to laws, and stormed government buildings of those that were ruling over them. This uprising was ultimately crushed by the combined military force of those in power. Though this uprising was very quickly dissolved, there are still resentful feelings about it to this day.

    The following years were dedicated to researching and understanding the world in which the people lived, as well as developing technology for those who were unable to use The Lacuna.

    The current date of the campaign is considered the Golden Age, as technology is as advanced as it ever has been, this is one of the most peaceful times (aside for Peace... allegedly), and The Lacuna as well as all Gods in general are fairly well understood.

    These are just the things that are surface-level history. There's so much more to be uncovered...

    View Full
  • ohhicas
    19.12.2021 - 1 mont ago

    fan OCS--

    Jiji (dandelion) who fell with the world with her personalized Chirithy (the one with the ears up) and her BFF Nisang’s chirithy (the other). Jiji’s not good at makeup but she tries hard, and sometimes her chirithy suffers the consequences of this. (It’s okay, it thinks it looks cute :) )

    My Islander Cos, hangin out with Bea who I would die for

    My failed-out (I stopped playing due to severe social anxiety) WoL Lacuna 

    #doodles #doodles: original character #vg oc#kh oc
    View Full
  • ilguna
    09.12.2021 - 1 mont ago

    I did the tiktok trend of putting names into an AI and letting it make art/pictures out of it.

    Anyway, I present to you, the Gallows Family.

    Reed Gallows

    Mox Gallows

    (Y/n) Gallows

    (Formally known as Lacuna).

    Alyssum Gallows

    Anyway I really like these because they weirdly represent the siblings. Did you notice that Reed has more of a floating island and Mox has more of the little boats? But (Y/n) has both because she was raised by them?

    And it looks like Alyssum has flowers! I’ve been using flowers for Alyssum since Whist, so it seems like it was just meant to be with her.

    The app that I used is WOMBO Dream.

    The mode I used was Mystical.

    #ilguna#halcyon #I just thought it was cool so I decided to share #:)
    View Full
  • dk-thrive
    04.11.2021 - 2 monts ago

    like the single grain of sand moving skywards in an hourglass just upended

    The capital was split by a partition which sliced right through it like a slash to the heart. Along the demarcation line – the frontier – were dilapidated houses riddled with bullet holes, empty courtyards scarred with grenade bursts, boarded stores gone to ruin, ornamented gates hanging at angles from broken hinges, luxury cars from another era rusting away under layers of dust … Roads were blocked by coils of barbed wire, piles of sandbags, barrels full of concrete, anti-tank ditches and watchtowers. Streets ended abruptly, like unfinished thoughts, unresolved feelings... Nicosia, the only divided capital in the world. It sounded almost a positive thing when described that way; something special about it, if not unique, a sense of defying gravity, like the single grain of sand moving skywards in an hourglass just upended.

    There are many things that a border – even one as clear-cut and well guarded as this – cannot prevent from crossing. The Etesian wind, for instance, the softly named but surprisingly strong meltemi or meltem. The butterflies, grasshoppers and lizards. The snails, too, painfully slow though they are. Occasionally, a birthday balloon that escapes a child’s grip drifts in the sky, strays into the other side – enemy territory.

    Then, the birds. Blue herons, black-headed buntings, honey buzzards, yellow wagtails, willow warblers, masked shrikes and, my favourites, golden orioles. All the way from the northern hemisphere, migrating mostly during the night, darkness gathering at the tips of their wings and etching red circles around their eyes, they stop here midway in their long journey, before continuing to Africa. The island for them is a resting place, a lacuna in the tale, an in-between-ness.

    — Elif Shafak, The Island of Missing Trees: A Novel (Bloomsbury Publishing; 1st edition (November 2, 2021) 

    View Full
  • architectnews
    23.09.2021 - 4 monts ago

    The Loft Lines, Queen’s Island Homes, Belfast

    The Loft Lines Queen’s Island Homes, Titanic Quarter Belfast Housing News, Property

    The Loft Lines, Queen’s Island Homes in Titanic Quarter

    23 Sep 2021

    Location: The Loft Lines, Queen’s Island, Titanic Quarter, Belfast, Northern Ireland

    Plans submitted for new riverside community of 780 homes at Titanic Quarter, Belfast

    Riverside Close:

    New Homes at Queen’s Island, Titanic Quarter, Belfast

    23 September 2021 – TODD Architects has submitted a planning application for 780 new homes at Queen’s Island in the heart of Belfast’s Titanic Quarter. On approval, the multi-million-pound scheme known as The Loft Lines would become one of the largest new residential construction projects in the UK and forms part of Belfast’s wider ambition to deliver over 31,500 new homes in the city by 2035.

    The Loft Lines is being delivered by Lacuna Developments and Watkin Jones Group in partnership with Titanic Quarter Limited and Belfast Harbour and will comprise an integrated mix of private rented, social and affordable apartment homes. A generous 20 percent will be housing association homes.

    The accommodation aims to deliver a level of residential amenities unseen in Belfast to date, with proposals including resident lounges, sports and recreational spaces, gyms, flexible working space, private dining spaces, games rooms, cinema rooms and children’s play areas. The development will be fully managed with wi-fi, amenities, gym and other extras included in residents’ rent.

    The 3.8-acre site has been configured into three blocks of apartments enclosing a one-acre public park and has been designed by TODD Architects to create a new community; a place for residents and visitors to enjoy, with green space, the water’s edge promenade and urban walkways prioritised over cars and roads. The buildings draw reference from Belfast’s industrial past and distinctive docklands rooflines to reflect the history of ship building and fabrication that once resonated on the site.

    South Square Yard:

    Andrew Murray, Director, TODD Architects said: “Whilst our design for The Loft Lines respects the important industrial heritage of the site, it also looks to the future of urban living, creating a vibrant lifestyle-first community that encourages sustainable and healthy living. This new riverside community says everything about Belfast’s confidence and ambition and we are proud to play a continuing role in the development of this evolving city. Thanks to our clients Lacuna Developments and Watkin Jones Group for their vision and the exciting brief, as well as the constructive support from Belfast City Council during pre-application discussions for this important regeneration project.”

    Alex Pease, Chief Investment Officer of Watkin Jones Group, said: “The Loft Lines will be a fantastic place to live and a major draw for people to the Titanic Quarter, as well as help to cement Belfast’s fast-growing reputation as one of the world’s most dynamic cities.

    “The places we build are designed to generate long-term value for the community over many decades and I’m thrilled at the prospect of seeing people make their home here.”

    The starting point for the design proposals was an ambition to create buildings that engage with the heritage of the Titanic Quarter as it transitions to a vibrant mixed-use community. A palette of clay-based materials has been specified with tones of reds, pinks and browns creating three distinct urban blocks that will be named after the technical skills of those who planned out the life-sized plate patterns of ships on floor of the shipyard’s mould loft, which once stood on the site of the proposed scheme.

    The three residential buildings have been designed to maximise views to the waterfront and increase natural light levels. Each block has a distinctive communal courtyard, designated as private residential amenity space, with room for informal seating and planted gardens, high-quality paving and materials and spill-out areas for gym classes.

    The ground and first floors have been planned to create ample space for community-based shops, a creche, local cafes and restaurants, a gym, startups, young companies and local community innovation. The entirety of the waterfront promenade will benefit from active frontages, not only providing useful services and businesses, but also helping to ensure that public areas are welcoming and safe for people of all ages.

    At the heart of The Loft Lines site is South Yard Square, a one-acre public area and urban woodland with a vibrant blend of smaller active spaces. The Square will be set at a lower level to provide additional shelter and a safe setting for all ages, with different seat areas for play or to take a break, surrounded by formal and informal planting, grass lawns and paths. Perfect for exercise classes and outdoor events, the aim is for the space to become a night-and-day location for everyone to share and enjoy.

    The proposals include a new 12m-wide 1km long waterfront promenade and a safe, shared pedestrian and cycleway running along the quayside. The promenade has been designed to link the site and the wider area around the Titanic Quarter, helping to create a more accessible location. The developers are working with Maritime Belfast to ensure The Loft Lines section of the Maritime Mile is enriched by art, nature and history, celebrating the area’s industrial heritage and connecting to other features across Queen’s Island and into the city.

    Connecting South Yard Square and the waterfront promenade, is a central boulevard. This pedestrian-prioritised walkway celebrates The Loft Line’s distinctive historic layout lines. This unique pattern is embedded in the fabric of the boulevard, and repeated in the walkways and spaces between buildings across the site.

    The developers have also committed to delivering a sustainable, low-carbon development with each building installed with the latest heat pump technology to reduce the site’s reliance on fossil fuels and helping to future proof the development. In line with the Belfast Agenda, which has set a target of a 15% increase in the use of sustainable transport by 2035, The Loft Lines will offer several sustainable travel measures, including ground-floor bike stores with wash down and repair facilities and will aim to reduce the reliance on car-parking with the promotion of other active travel measures.

    Images: Todd Architects

    TODD Architects

    The Loft Lines Queen’s Island Homes, Titanic Quarter Belfast, Northern Ireland images / information received 230921 from Todd Architects

    Location: Belfast, Northern Ireland

    Northern Irish Building Designs

    Recent Architecture in Northern Ireland

    Belfast Building News

    Bedford Yard Belfast aparthotel and office Building, Northern Ireland Design: TODD Architects image courtesy of architects office Bedford Yard Belfast

    The Sixth Belfast Office Building Design: Allford Hall Monaghan Morris Architects (AHMM) image courtesy of architects The Sixth Belfast Office Building

    City Quays 2 Belfast Harbour Building Design: Grimshaw, Architects photograph : Donal McCann Photography City Quays 2 Belfast Harbour Building

    Titanic Belfast Architect & Lead Consultant: TODD Architects ; Concept Design: CivicArts / Eric R Kuhne & Associates photo : Christopher Heaney Titanic Belfast Building

    Giants Causeway Building Design: Heneghan Peng Architects photograph : Marie Louise Halpenny Giants Causeway Visitor Centre Building

    Lyric Theatre Belfast Design: O’Donnell + Tuomey architects photo : Dennis Gilbert/VIEW Lyric Theatre Belfast Building

    Belfast Architecture

    Irish Architectural Designs

    Irish Architecture News

    Irish Architecture Designs – chronological list

    Irish Architecture

    Irish Architect

    Comments / photos for the The Loft Lines Queen’s Island Homes, Titanic Quarter Belfast, Northern Ireland page welcome

    The post The Loft Lines, Queen’s Island Homes, Belfast appeared first on e-architect.

    View Full
  • okaycupid
    14.08.2021 - 5 monts ago
    View Full
  • theowlhouseheadcanons
    05.08.2021 - 5 monts ago
    #the owl house #the owl house headcanons #toh
    View Full
  • cuartoretorno
    03.07.2021 - 6 monts ago

    Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind 2004

    Joel Barish (Jim Carrey), tímido y retraído, y Clementine Kruczynski (Kate Winslet), de espíritu libre y espontánea, se conocen en el Ferrocarril de Long Island desde Montauk hasta Rockville Centre. Los dos han sentido una extraña necesidad de viajar a Montauk ese día y conectan casi inmediatamente, a pesar de sus personalidades opuestas. Aunque ellos no lo saben, Joel y Clementine son en realidad exnovios, ahora separados después de una relación de dos años. Después de una discusión, Clementine acudió a la clínica Lacuna, Inc. para borrar todos los recuerdos de su relación con Joel. Tras enterarse a través de sus amigos Rob y Carrie, Joel queda devastado y decide someterse él también al procedimiento de borrado de memoria, un proceso que se lleva a cabo en casa del paciente por la noche mientras este duerme.

    View Full
  • loulou1943
    08.06.2021 - 7 monts ago
    View Full
  • violanoir
    28.05.2021 - 7 monts ago

    Дайджест 28.05.2021

    Канадский музыкант и продюсер Рис Фалбер (Front Line Assembly, Delerium) приступил к работе над новым, пятым по счёту студийным альбомом своего проекта Conjure One. Выпустить его он планирует в этом году на Black Hole Recordings, но ни название, ни дата релиза пока не уточняются. Уже можно послушать первый сингл Animals, вокальную партию в котором исполнила Джарен Серф, известная сотрудничеством с Армином ван Бюреном, Dash Berlin и другими светилами трансовой музыки.

    Не так давно мы рассказывали о Piston Damp – новом проекте Йонаса Грота из Apoptygma Berzerk, который также приходится братом лидеру группы Стефану Гроту. С тех пор было выпущено несколько синглов, которые со временем переросли в полноценный альбом. Он получил название Making The World Great Again и появится 10 июня на Sub Culture Records. Мастеринг проводил Оле-Эспен Кристиансен (Elec This!, OK Minus).

    11 июня на Una Music выйдет 14-й альбом Northern Lite — JA, впервые полностью на немецком языке.

    Проект Джона Расселла (Jonteknik) и Марка Стэгга (Lionrock) Rocket Report выпустит дебютный Overmorrow 18 июня. Альбом содержит кавер-версии песен Depeche Mode, The Psychedelic Furs, Joy Division и Book Of Love.

    Второй альбом Johnny Dynamite & The Bloodsuckers — Sleeveless выйдет 25 июня на Born Losers Records.

    Лейбл Aztec Records обрадует любителей синтвейва тремя полноформатными дебютниками из разных уголков света. Первой отстреляется Франция с релизом Sight Telma Club – The New Ancients, послушать его можно будет уже сегодня. Следующим на очереди идёт штатовский проект Syst3m Glitch с альбомом Beyond Stars, который поступит в продажу 4 июня. Третьим выпустится немецкий продюсер Morphoice – его пластинку Vinyl City мы услышим 15-го числа. Все трое придерживаются схожей тематики: много неона, щемящая ностальгия по 80-м, оммаж киберпанку в целом и «Бегущему по лезвию» в частности – словом, всё, как вы любите.

    Третий альбом Cassetter — Robot Era будет доступен 11 июня на FiXT Neon.

    15 июня на лейбле Mecanica канадская EBM-группа !Bang Elektronika отметит своё 35-летие выпуском расширенной виниловой версии сингла 1991 года Aktivierung! с новыми ремиксами и би-сайдом.

    Проект Антони Майовви Jason Priest выпустит дебют Jason Priest Is Missing 11 июня на Midnight Mannequin Records.

    12-й альбом Opera Multi Steel — D’Une Pierre Deux Tombes выйдет 29 июня на Wave Records / Meidosem Records.

    Двое участников Radiohead, фронтмен Том Йорк и гитарист Джонни Гринвуд, организовали новую группу – The Smile. К составу примкнул джазовый барабанщик Том Скиннер (Sons Of Kemet), а также продюсер и звукорежиссёр Найджел Годрич. Своим названием команда обязана одноимённому стихотворению британского поэта Теда Хьюза. Отрывок из их первого выступления на онлайн-фестивале «Гластонбери» можно посмотреть здесь.

    Магия чисел этого дайджеста — четвертый альбом Exek — Good Thing They Ripped Up The Carpet выходит 4 июня на Lulus Sonic Disc Club.

    11 июля на Red Maze Records появится одноимённый дебют мексиканского дуэта Dancing Strangers.

    4 июня выйдет второй лонгплей Ashes Fallen — A Fleeting Melody Out Of A Fading Dream, одна из песен которого посвящена культовой для готической субкультуры актрисе Майле Нурми.

    Оскандалившиеся готик-рокеры Sonsombre открестились от расистских заявлений своего лидера Брэндона Пайбуса (подробности и возмущённую реакцию фанатов можно найти тут и тут), вскоре после чего обрели пристанище на лейбле Cleopatra Records. На нём у группы 11 июня выйдет четвёртый альбом с символическим названием Revival.

    Недавний лонгплей A Cloud Of Ravens – Another Kind Of Midnight (наш обзор которого читайте здесь) обзаведётся ремиксовой версией, созданной при участии Clan Of Xymox, ACTORS, Криса Вренны (Tweaker, ex-Nine Inch Nails), Джона Фрайера (Depeche Mode, Nine Inch Nails) и других. Что у них получилось, узнаем 24 июня. Лейбл тот же – Cleopatra Records.

    Третий полноформатник Lost In Grey — Under The Surface будет доступен 2 июля на Reaper Entertainment.

    Cradle Of Filth официально приняли в свои ряды новую клавишницу. Ею стала Анабелль Иратни, известная по участию в проекте Дэни Филта Devilment и своей собственной группе Veile. Она заменит Линдси Скулкрафт, покинувшую команду в феврале прошлого года.

    Издательство DC Comics представляет серию комиксов Dark Nights: Death Metal Band Edition, вдохновлённую тяжёлой музыкой. Помимо привычных для DC-вселенной супергероев вроде Бэтмена, Джокера и Чудо-женщины, на его страницах появятся звёзды метал-сцены: Оззи Осборн, Megadeth, Ghost, Lacuna Coil, Opeth, Sepultura и Dream Theater. До конца текущего года выйдут семь выпусков (полюбоваться обложками можно по ссылке). В поддержку серии 28 июня на Loma Vista Recordings также выйдет саундтрек, в треклисте которого будут уже не только сугубо металлерские, но и более разноплановые в жанровом отношении вещи за авторством Челси Вулф, Марии Бринк (In This Moment), Health, Gunship, Idles и других артистов.

    Лидер Anathema Даниель Кэвано запускает новый проект Weather Systems. Его название позаимствовано у одноимённого девятого студийника Anathema 2012 года и, видимо, неспроста: по словам композитора, его «музыка станет продолжением наследия предыдущей группы». Ранее музыкант анонсировал сольный альбом под названием Cellar Door, песни с которого, вероятно, и послужат материалом для Weather Systems. Помимо Даниеля, о других участниках группы пока неизвестно. Его брат Винсент, согласно ряду источников, работает над неким собственным проектом в электронном жанре.

    Роб Зомби вместе с другими участниками своей группы – гитаристом Джоном 5 и барабанщиком Томми Клафетосом – сформировали новый проект L.A. Rats. К составу коллектива также присоединился басист Mötley Crüe Никки Сиккс. Первым синглом новообразованной супергруппы стал кавер на песню австралийского кантри-певца Джеффа Мака I’ve Been Everywhere, которую он сочинил в 1959 году, после чего она стала хитом в исполнении Лаки Старра и Джонни Кэша. Композиция войдёт в саундтрек к предстоящему триллеру «Ледяной драйв», который выйдет в российский прокат 25 июня.

    18 июня на Hummus Records / Two Gentlemen выйдет одноимённый дебют проекта фронтмена The Young Gods Франца Трейхлера /A\.

    В этот же день появится дебютный мини-сольник вокалистки Null Positiv Элли Берлин — Lieb Mich.

    Тилль Линдеманн тизерит очередной сольный сингл под названием Ich Hasse Kinder, что в переводе означает «я ненавижу детей». Ирония ситуации в том, что выпустит он его 1 июня – в аккурат к Международному дню защиты детей. Клип будет выдержан в советской эстетике, к которой дед, очевидно, прикипел душой.

    13 июля на Hanson Records будет доступна к прослушиванию коллаборация бывшего участника нойз-группы Wolf Eyes Аарона Диллоуэя и колумбийской эксперименталистки Лукреции Дальт, которая так и называется — Lucy & Aaron.

    16 июля на Detail Records / BMG выходит новый альбом австралийского музыканта Ника Мёрфи, также известного под псевдонимом Chet Faker. Работа называется Hotel Surrender.

    1 июня на Cryo Chamber заявит о себе проект Пера Бострома (Kammarheit) Cities Last Broadcast, выпустив альбом The Umbra Report.

    8 июля на Black Mara выходит Nubiferous — Sagan Zaba — новый альбом российского проекта, вдохновлённый спиритизмом и священными местами народов Севера, в основном Урала и Сибири.

    31 мая на Rusted Tone Recordings будет доступен кассетный дебют британского эмбиент-трио Konstruct — Three (Squared). Мастеринг выполнил Джеймс Армстронг (Slow Clinic).

    Второй альбом шотландско-ирландского квартета Island People — II переживет релиз 4 июня на Raster.

    Дайджест 28.05.2021 was originally published on ViolaNoir

    View Full
  • daily-art-news
    15.04.2021 - 9 monts ago

    Long Pushed to the Margins, Pacita Abad’s Art About the Immigrant Experience Gets Global Recognition

    The story of the thousands of immigrants who passed through Ellis Island in New York during the late 19th and early 20th centuries is well-known to many, and on a visit to it, you can learn about the Jews who left eastern Europe to escape oppression, the Italians who came to the United States seeking upward mobility, the Armenians who arrived amid a genocide at home, the Syrians who crossed the Atlantic to find new lives abroad, and many more stories like this. What you cannot learn about, the artist Pacita Abad realized when she came to Ellis Island as a tourist in 1991, is about the stories of the Asian, African, and Latin American immigrants who came to the U.S. Surprised by this lacuna in the history of immigration to the U.S., she knew she had to make art about it.

    Abad, herself an immigrant born in Batanes, an island in the Philippines, understood that Asian, African, and Latin American immigrants had come to the U.S. by different routes, meaning that they never passed by the Statue of Liberty while en route to Ellis Island. She thought, too, of the Latinx and Asian immigrants who arrived in the mid-20th century: What of them? “Their experience was just as important and needs to be understood,” she said in a 1994 interview.

    And so she painted L.A. Liberty (1992), a brilliantly colored image in which Lady Liberty appears as a woman of color donning a multi-patterned robe. Rays of red, purple, black, green, and blue shoot out from behind her. In place of the Declaration of Independence, she holds a tablet covered in pops of color—a new kind of U.S. history for an audience that has historically been ignored by it.

    L.A. Liberty was among the most celebrated works in a 2018 Abad survey that opened at the Manila’s Museum of Contemporary Art and Design, and that exhibition led to another devoted last year to the artist at Spike Island in Bristol, England. In its glowing review, ArtReview called L.A. Liberty an “exuberant banner for multiculturalism”—a sentiment that has been shared by many since.

    Pacita Abad, L.A. Liberty, 1992.

    These two exhibitions may have effectively fueled an Abad mania that is being felt worldwide. In 2020, Abad became the subject of a Google Doodle—a status typically attained by artists like Wassily Kandinsky, Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, and Gustav Klimt, whose reputations are far more cemented than hers. This year, Abad’s work is featured in the Gwangju Biennale, perhaps the most important recurring exhibition in South Korea; over the summer, it will figure in a Haus der Kunst exhibition alongside pieces by Isaac Julien, Jacolby Satterwhite, and Tschabalala Self, and the Jameel Arts Centre in Dubai is planning a solo exhibition for October. The new fervor for Abad’s work will reach a fever pitch in 2023, when the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis stages the first-ever U.S. survey devoted to her.

    Many Styles, One Artistic Vision

    Abad, who died in 2004 at age 58, has long evaded art history because her work and her life deny easy placement. She spent much of her career moving around the globe, rarely remaining in one locale for longer than a decade, and she worked in modes that at first seem to be at odds with each other: abstraction and figuration, painting and ceramics, deeply political concerns and also ones intended mainly to stimulate the eye. Fitting her into one movement is impossible, but art history exists in multiples, after all—artists of different genders, different races, and different nationalities respond to the same events in vastly different way. As an understanding of this grows among curators and scholars, Abad’s work, with its emphasis on global living today as a prismatic, joyous, and multi-perspectival thing, is gaining new prominence.

    “My aunt was a part of so many different art histories, but in a way, she wasn’t part of any single one,” Pio Abad, the artist’s nephew, who co-curated the Spike Island and Museum of Contemporary Art of Design shows, said in an interview with ARTnews. “The way her work occupies these different narratives is part of something that a lot of people find interesting or relevant, given that we’re trying to make sense of multiple strands of art history—and of history in general.”

    Abad went on to produce thousands of works over more than three decades before her career was cut short by lung cancer, but she never set out to be an artist. Born in 1946 in Basco, Abad was the daughter of two politicians. She herself had once planned on pursuing a political career—she studied political science as an undergraduate in the Philippines. As the dictatorial regime of Ferdinand Marcos closed in, amid threats of violence for her family, Abad’s parents urged her to go abroad. In 1969, she left Manila with plans to go to Spain. Then, while visiting a relative in San Francisco, she stayed there, later attending Lone Mountain College, where she got her M.A. in Asian history—at the time still a nascent discipline in the U.S.

    “This was right at the time when the Bay Area started to see the development of Asian studies and ethnic studies as courses for study,” Victoria Sung, a Walker Art Center curator who is organizing her forthcoming survey, said. “That was a result of late 1960s student protests, when Black and Asian students banded together to agitate for these courses of study. She was at the vanguard, in terms of her pursuing Asian studies in a U.S. context.”

    Planning to become a lawyer, Abad got a scholarship to continue school at the University of California, Berkeley. Then she turned it down and chose to go to art school, taking courses in Washington, D.C. and New York.

    Pacita Abad’s 2020 Spike Island show.

    Global Inspirations

    Having briefly married the artist George Kleiman, she began a relationship in 1973 with the development economist Jack Garrity, whom she later married. They traveled Asia together, and to later parts of Africa, too. Her biography can at times read like a rich travelogue: stops in Sudan, Afghanistan, Laos, Pakistan, India; time spent in Alexandria, Honolulu, Brisbane, Lima, Bamako, Barcelona, Jakarta; periods of residency in Washington, D.C. and Singapore. Constantly on the move, she lived a “global peripatetic existence,” as Sung put it, and she saw aspects of herself in the various peoples she witnessed.

    Her earliest mature works, from the 1980s, are done in a social realist mode. We see women in burqas, veiled figures wading into water in Bangladesh, members of the Turkana people in Kenya going about their daily lives. Sometimes, more political material comes through—in one painting, Benigno Aquino Jr., a senator in the Philippines who opposed the Marcos regime, is shown shot dead. Not too long after making these works, however, Abad went in a different direction and produced brilliantly stylized images paying homage to the vast array of cultures to which she was exposed.

    For many, Abad’s crowning achievement is her “Immigrant Experience” series, done in the 1990s. These were personal works for Abad. One titled Filipina: A Racial Identity Crisis (1990) features two women positioned side by side. On the left is the Filipina actress is Maria Isabel Lopez, a mestiza; on the right is a darker-skinned woman who comes from the Malay tribes. “As you may have guessed I lean more towards the tribal Filipina and that may explain why I am so interested in remote, exotic and distant places like Papua New Guinea, Cambodia and Indonesia,” Abad once wrote.

    But Abad was also fascinated by people whose experience she did not share. She painted Korean shopkeepers living in the U.S., Haitians shown amid barbed wire at a refugee camp in Guantanamo Bay, and sex workers in Manila’s Ermita district. To make these works, Abad relied on a technique she called trapunto, which involved stuffing and stitching her canvas, creating richly textured three-dimensional objects that marry traditional craft techniques with painterly ones. (They have been shown hung from gallery ceilings, allowing viewers to see the pieces from all angles.) Abad created these paintings in her home, which doubled as her studio, often producing several at once. One trapunto painting took her about six to eight weeks to produce, Pio Abad, her nephew, said.

    These are celebrations of multiculturalism and hybridity, both in content and form. “She was pulling all these different cultural traditions to make these abstractions in a [way] that was very different from the kind of abstract painting that was happening in the U.S. or in Europe at the time,” Sung, the Walker curator, said.

    Pacita Abad’s 2020 Spike Island show.

    The Root of It All

    Abad’s “Masks and Spirits” series, made around the same time, now also ranks among her most celebrated bodies of work. With these, Abad turned to Western modernist tropes about African masks, albeit with a twist. For one work called European Mask (1990) that was recently acquired by the Tate museum network, she envisions a face with giant almond-shaped eyes flanked with abstractions resembling Sonia Delaunay canvases. The title is intentionally general: What is a European mask, anyway? “She pointed to the way that Europe is a homogenous continent, which is the way that European artists treated Africa,” said Kasia Redzisz, senior curator of Tate Liverpool, where the work is now on view. “It was this notion of an ‘African mask’ without any identity or any roots.”

    If Abad’s work is only now gaining recognition in the West, paintings such as these brought her acclaim in the Philippines and Indonesia. Early on in her artistic career, she turned heads when, in 1984, she became the first woman to win an Outstanding Young Men award in the Philippines, which historically went to males who made strides in the arts and sciences. Within the country, her work generated acclaim as it moved further into abstraction, bringing in techniques derived from Tibetan thangka painting, Panamanian Mola textiles, and Pakistani ralli and Bangladeshi kantha quilts. By the end of her career, while based in Singapore, she was chosen to paint the Alkaff Bridge, a giant pedestrian walkway with she covered in resplendent abstract forms.

    During her lifetime, Abad’s work was periodically seen in the U.S., at venues like the Bronx Museum of the Arts in New York and the National Museum of Women in the Arts in Washington, D.C., but generally speaking, those in the West have been slow to catch up to what audiences in the Philippines and Indonesia have seen in her art.

    Not artist Faith Ringgold, however. In 2005, for a book about Asian American artists, Ringgold wrote, “Widely traveled, Abad creates her work from the point of view of an international woman of color. Those of us who have traveled extensively know that creative women of color are working all over the world and are not merely ‘minority’ figures within the narrow confines of the Western art world. Who knows how contemporary art will be seen in the years to come, once women and artists of color gain equal opportunity to address their cultural concerns through art? That day, thank heavens, is definitely coming, so let’s all of us get ready.”

    #artnewsartist #ARTnews.com
    View Full
  • myartnation
    15.04.2021 - 9 monts ago

    Long Pushed to the Margins, Pacita Abad’s Art About the Immigrant Experience Gets Global Recognition

    The story of the thousands of immigrants who passed through Ellis Island in New York during the late 19th and early 20th centuries is well-known to many, and on a visit to it, you can learn about the Jews who left eastern Europe to escape oppression, the Italians who came to the United States seeking upward mobility, the Armenians who arrived amid a genocide at home, the Syrians who crossed the Atlantic to find new lives abroad, and many more stories like this. What you cannot learn about, the artist Pacita Abad realized when she came to Ellis Island as a tourist in 1991, is about the stories of the Asian, African, and Latin American immigrants who came to the U.S. Surprised by this lacuna in the history of immigration to the U.S., she knew she had to make art about it.

    Abad, herself an immigrant born in Batanes, an island in the Philippines, understood that Asian, African, and Latin American immigrants had come to the U.S. by different routes, meaning that they never passed by the Statue of Liberty while en route to Ellis Island. She thought, too, of the Latinx and Asian immigrants who arrived in the mid-20th century: What of them? “Their experience was just as important and needs to be understood,” she said in a 1994 interview.

    And so she painted L.A. Liberty (1992), a brilliantly colored image in which Lady Liberty appears as a woman of color donning a multi-patterned robe. Rays of red, purple, black, green, and blue shoot out from behind her. In place of the Declaration of Independence, she holds a tablet covered in pops of color—a new kind of U.S. history for an audience that has historically been ignored by it.

    L.A. Liberty was among the most celebrated works in a 2018 Abad survey that opened at the Manila’s Museum of Contemporary Art and Design, and that exhibition led to another devoted last year to the artist at Spike Island in Bristol, England. In its glowing review, ArtReview called L.A. Liberty an “exuberant banner for multiculturalism”—a sentiment that has been shared by many since.

    Pacita Abad, L.A. Liberty, 1992.

    These two exhibitions may have effectively fueled an Abad mania that is being felt worldwide. In 2020, Abad became the subject of a Google Doodle—a status typically attained by artists like Wassily Kandinsky, Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, and Gustav Klimt, whose reputations are far more cemented than hers. This year, Abad’s work is featured in the Gwangju Biennale, perhaps the most important recurring exhibition in South Korea; over the summer, it will figure in a Haus der Kunst exhibition alongside pieces by Isaac Julien, Jacolby Satterwhite, and Tschabalala Self, and the Jameel Arts Centre in Dubai is planning a solo exhibition for October. The new fervor for Abad’s work will reach a fever pitch in 2023, when the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis stages the first-ever U.S. survey devoted to her.

    Many Styles, One Artistic Vision

    Abad, who died in 2004 at age 58, has long evaded art history because her work and her life deny easy placement. She spent much of her career moving around the globe, rarely remaining in one locale for longer than a decade, and she worked in modes that at first seem to be at odds with each other: abstraction and figuration, painting and ceramics, deeply political concerns and also ones intended mainly to stimulate the eye. Fitting her into one movement is impossible, but art history exists in multiples, after all—artists of different genders, different races, and different nationalities respond to the same events in vastly different way. As an understanding of this grows among curators and scholars, Abad’s work, with its emphasis on global living today as a prismatic, joyous, and multi-perspectival thing, is gaining new prominence.

    “My aunt was a part of so many different art histories, but in a way, she wasn’t part of any single one,” Pio Abad, the artist’s nephew, who co-curated the Spike Island and Museum of Contemporary Art of Design shows, said in an interview with ARTnews. “The way her work occupies these different narratives is part of something that a lot of people find interesting or relevant, given that we’re trying to make sense of multiple strands of art history—and of history in general.”

    Abad went on to produce thousands of works over more than three decades before her career was cut short by lung cancer, but she never set out to be an artist. Born in 1946 in Basco, Abad was the daughter of two politicians. She herself had once planned on pursuing a political career—she studied political science as an undergraduate in the Philippines. As the dictatorial regime of Ferdinand Marcos closed in, amid threats of violence for her family, Abad’s parents urged her to go abroad. In 1969, she left Manila with plans to go to Spain. Then, while visiting a relative in San Francisco, she stayed there, later attending Lone Mountain College, where she got her M.A. in Asian history—at the time still a nascent discipline in the U.S.

    “This was right at the time when the Bay Area started to see the development of Asian studies and ethnic studies as courses for study,” Victoria Sung, a Walker Art Center curator who is organizing her forthcoming survey, said. “That was a result of late 1960s student protests, when Black and Asian students banded together to agitate for these courses of study. She was at the vanguard, in terms of her pursuing Asian studies in a U.S. context.”

    Planning to become a lawyer, Abad got a scholarship to continue school at the University of California, Berkeley. Then she turned it down and chose to go to art school, taking courses in Washington, D.C. and New York.

    Pacita Abad’s 2020 Spike Island show.

    Global Inspirations

    Having briefly married the artist George Kleiman, she began a relationship in 1973 with the development economist Jack Garrity, whom she later married. They traveled Asia together, and to later parts of Africa, too. Her biography can at times read like a rich travelogue: stops in Sudan, Afghanistan, Laos, Pakistan, India; time spent in Alexandria, Honolulu, Brisbane, Lima, Bamako, Barcelona, Jakarta; periods of residency in Washington, D.C. and Singapore. Constantly on the move, she lived a “global peripatetic existence,” as Sung put it, and she saw aspects of herself in the various peoples she witnessed.

    Her earliest mature works, from the 1980s, are done in a social realist mode. We see women in burqas, veiled figures wading into water in Bangladesh, members of the Turkana people in Kenya going about their daily lives. Sometimes, more political material comes through—in one painting, Benigno Aquino Jr., a senator in the Philippines who opposed the Marcos regime, is shown shot dead. Not too long after making these works, however, Abad went in a different direction and produced brilliantly stylized images paying homage to the vast array of cultures to which she was exposed.

    For many, Abad’s crowning achievement is her “Immigrant Experience” series, done in the 1990s. These were personal works for Abad. One titled Filipina: A Racial Identity Crisis (1990) features two women positioned side by side. On the left is the Filipina actress is Maria Isabel Lopez, a mestiza; on the right is a darker-skinned woman who comes from the Malay tribes. “As you may have guessed I lean more towards the tribal Filipina and that may explain why I am so interested in remote, exotic and distant places like Papua New Guinea, Cambodia and Indonesia,” Abad once wrote.

    But Abad was also fascinated by people whose experience she did not share. She painted Korean shopkeepers living in the U.S., Haitians shown amid barbed wire at a refugee camp in Guantanamo Bay, and sex workers in Manila’s Ermita district. To make these works, Abad relied on a technique she called trapunto, which involved stuffing and stitching her canvas, creating richly textured three-dimensional objects that marry traditional craft techniques with painterly ones. (They have been shown hung from gallery ceilings, allowing viewers to see the pieces from all angles.) Abad created these paintings in her home, which doubled as her studio, often producing several at once. One trapunto painting took her about six to eight weeks to produce, Pio Abad, her nephew, said.

    These are celebrations of multiculturalism and hybridity, both in content and form. “She was pulling all these different cultural traditions to make these abstractions in a [way] that was very different from the kind of abstract painting that was happening in the U.S. or in Europe at the time,” Sung, the Walker curator, said.

    Pacita Abad’s 2020 Spike Island show.

    The Root of It All

    Abad’s “Masks and Spirits” series, made around the same time, now also ranks among her most celebrated bodies of work. With these, Abad turned to Western modernist tropes about African masks, albeit with a twist. For one work called European Mask (1990) that was recently acquired by the Tate museum network, she envisions a face with giant almond-shaped eyes flanked with abstractions resembling Sonia Delaunay canvases. The title is intentionally general: What is a European mask, anyway? “She pointed to the way that Europe is a homogenous continent, which is the way that European artists treated Africa,” said Kasia Redzisz, senior curator of Tate Liverpool, where the work is now on view. “It was this notion of an ‘African mask’ without any identity or any roots.”

    If Abad’s work is only now gaining recognition in the West, paintings such as these brought her acclaim in the Philippines and Indonesia. Early on in her artistic career, she turned heads when, in 1984, she became the first woman to win an Outstanding Young Men award in the Philippines, which historically went to males who made strides in the arts and sciences. Within the country, her work generated acclaim as it moved further into abstraction, bringing in techniques derived from Tibetan thangka painting, Panamanian Mola textiles, and Pakistani ralli and Bangladeshi kantha quilts. By the end of her career, while based in Singapore, she was chosen to paint the Alkaff Bridge, a giant pedestrian walkway with she covered in resplendent abstract forms.

    During her lifetime, Abad’s work was periodically seen in the U.S., at venues like the Bronx Museum of the Arts in New York and the National Museum of Women in the Arts in Washington, D.C., but generally speaking, those in the West have been slow to catch up to what audiences in the Philippines and Indonesia have seen in her art.

    Not artist Faith Ringgold, however. In 2005, for a book about Asian American artists, Ringgold wrote, “Widely traveled, Abad creates her work from the point of view of an international woman of color. Those of us who have traveled extensively know that creative women of color are working all over the world and are not merely ‘minority’ figures within the narrow confines of the Western art world. Who knows how contemporary art will be seen in the years to come, once women and artists of color gain equal opportunity to address their cultural concerns through art? That day, thank heavens, is definitely coming, so let’s all of us get ready.”

    from ARTnews.com https://ift.tt/3ae15iS via https://www.artnews.com

    View Full
  • camisaamor202
    02.04.2021 - 9 monts ago

    New York Islanders derrotou Washington Capitals duas vezes

    No primeiro jogo entre as duas equipes, no final do mês passado, o New York Islanders derrotou o Washington Capitals por 5 a 2. Neste jogo, os New York Islanders derrotaram o Washington Capitals por 8-4. Eles não deram ao Washington Capitals uma chance de vingança. Mathew Barzal, vestindo uma camisola New York Islanders, marcou 5 pontos para ajudar o time a conquistar uma grande vitória.

    Os fãs que conhecem jogos de hóquei no gelo sabem que em jogos de hóquei no gelo raramente têm a vantagem de uma grande diferença de pontuação. Como os intensos esportes no gelo consomem a força física dos jogadores, os fãs podem sentir a emocionante programação na tela. Embora John Carlson do Washington Capitals marcou o primeiro gol para ajudar a equipe a assumir a liderança no jogo. Mas os jogadores das Ilhas de Nova York gradualmente lançaram um ataque, especialmente Mathew Barzal marcou a maioria dos gols e completou um hat-trick.

    O New York Islanders tem um forte controle do jogo normal e, mesmo que o Washington Capitals marcasse quatro pontos, não seria capaz de salvar a derrota. Vendo o placar final, os jogadores do New York Islanders beijaram alegremente suas camisolas nhl. E a grande lacuna na pontuação mostra o excelente desempenho dos habitantes das ilhas de Nova York e do pobre estado de Washington Capitals. Atualmente, Washington Capitals, New York Islanders e Pittsburgh Penguins têm 50 pontos na Conferência Leste.

    View Full
  • lmorasey
    21.03.2021 - 10 monts ago

    MY FINAL BOOK IS OUT NOW!!!

    Go here to get it!!

    The final book in my trilogy The Novan Chronicles is now up for sale on Amazon ($0.99 for the ebook)!!  

    As the enemy closes in, Cass must do whatever it takes to defend her world.

    Evana has assumed the throne of the Kingdom of Nixa, leaving Cassatia and her supporters fearing for their lives. In order to take her rightful place as queen, Cass finds herself forming an unprecedented alliance of fire and ice, joining forces with her people’s greatest foes to combat an even greater enemy.

    Cass and her friends must travel the world to build her army before making a final stand against Evana, inciting a battle that will determine the future of the Novan orders once and for all. Cass will need all the luck, wits and bravery she can get on her side if she hopes to defeat the High Priestess…and one Novan must be willing to make the ultimate sacrifice.

    This is the final installment of The Novan Chronicles, a YA fantasy trilogy about various orders of supernatural people (called Novans) eternally at war with each other, and a bunch of teenagers looking to put an end to it all. You can check out the Comic Sans version of it here. 

    As always, the greatest of thanks to my beta reader @rose-red-ink, who has beta’d this entire trilogy for me, and to @tiablackraven for the amazing cover art!! I also want to thank anyone who has read or supported my books in the past--you guys are the reason I love to write!

    Currently (probably for a limited time), the first two books are free to buy wherever books are sold (at least in ebook form)--you can check them out here!! I always enjoy introducing new readers to Keira and Cass and the gang ;) 

    Tagging a bunch of Tumblr peeps under the cut (reblogs and boosts are so, so appreciated!): 

    @musicofglassandwords, @thewritertiffany, @toboldlywrite, @to-be-a-rose @erinisawriter, @jaywrites101, @zhouprodigy, @tokyoghoulua,  @thoughtsofthestars, @simplelinesunfashiond, @isananna-writes, @writerinafury @the-writers-blocks, @robinsidereus, @cometworks, @writersloth, @ashesconstellation, @waywordwriter, @kainablue, @scholarlypidgeot, @writings-of-a-narwhal, @distance-does-not-matter, @lookslikechill, @i-rove-rock-n-roll, @mariahwritesstuff, @bml1997, @elvisbot, @moonflower-writing, @jowriteist, @jade-island-lives, @erinisawriter, @notanalien51, @gwens-fiction, @draculinawrites, @writerfae, @dawnflavoured, @carmenwritesmore-blog, @riseofthesea, @stand-inthe-rain, @onlywhenitsraininglove, @mvcreates, @necros-writings, @alinakerrin, @idiotstoobsereve, @carnationwrites, @sjdcavedtofandom, @marlettwrites, @jackeritesstuff, @always-write7, @drowsy-quill, @lura-wilcox,@sobertwo, @fixaidea, @alwolfesblog @floraphoenixwrites, @cyraniadebergerac, @shamelesslypoetic, @focusdumbass, @scmalarky, @astrophile16, @bettsican, @princejacque, @thescribesloft, @all-hail-mono-onion, @dragonscalesatdawn, @duktales715, @katerinarevel, @theresconfettieverywherehelp, @justadamfangirl, @foreshadowedbeginning, @waywardwriter, @vnsmiles, @bookish-actor, @bitchyeahmagnets, @theevolutionofledarose, @leonorfleet @kriss-the-writing-nerd  @zburatorii @writerinafury @fiddler-unroofed @thatfizzyyyy @authorjoeypaul @gaydumbgeek @a-moviescript-ending @quoting-machine @tabbykatwrites @magicalmisstemi @ettawritesnstudies @piiiidgeon @lunarcottoncandy  @jaimistoryteller @kiwimeringue @h-brook-writes @raywritesblog @raevenlywrites @nancydrew4you @quilloftheclouds @adorable-bookworm @wordsofpaintandsmoke @faesongwrites @writer-queen-vee @jackeritesstuff @sophielovesbooks @wholetmegrowup94 @foxesandmagic @j-is-gonna-write-28 @violetqueenmarie @espelho-the-wayward-writer @chavawrites @twentytwohearts-reblog @harrybpoetry @angelshirahime @sunshineomeara @ofghostsandconstellations @tlbodine @writingwithhotchocolate @birdfrenchforbird @natalierosewrites @authorisada @theramblinganalyst @words-dance-i-write @oneleggedflamingo @owl-writes @happyorogeny @theevolutionofledarose @necros-writings @a-sentence-everyday @lura-wilcox @novelsandnewfies @terra-normal @happysocialmoth @awaiting-my-escape @grilledcheesewithdisease @procrastinatorkimberlygrey @imjustverable @kai517-teenwriter @dragonofthenorth0726 @nadiarexler @bitchqueen1114 @joyful-soul-collector @the-cat-magician @coffeeandpurplepens @trapped-inadystopianovel @surroundedbypearls @foreshadowedbeginning @deadlyessencewhispers @time-to-write-and-suffer @cookiesaresquishy @amessofawriteblr @littledragon-fan @theblueelfling @purple-tears @0voidprince @lakesmovielist @ab5ter-2-0 @liarede @thatsmybluefondue @dentseymour @humbleboys @velvetlighthouse @writer-s-a-tyler @lifestreetstyle  @danger-writes @saltnpepapig @thatchaoticneutraltrainwreck @astrophile16 @enchantingdyke @ratherinterestingmilkshake @rokokokokolores @cabaretofwords @moonlightdreamr @writinginthesilvermoonlight @inkformyblood @you-never-know-where-i-am @brookheda @sobertwo @itsagentlemanshat @kiki-thelocal-farmhoe @human-nonsense @qelizhus @ahotpeaceofshit @mercymageooc @haunted-by-the-ink @c-vendett  @a-messes-blog-of-ocs-and-whump  @emberparkerwriteblog @waterfallofinkandpages @dmbn @mlgwrites @bitchyeahmagnets @thoughtsofthestars @gardamn  @alinakerrin @katerinarevel @siamonbonhon @welcome-to-my-reality-blog @i-got-headphones-on-wdyw @brennawrites @maggie-wolff-writes @tuckertales @writinginthebox @n1ghtcrawlers @noodlesforthought @corishadowfang @blue-jay-life @beanenigma @pippermiints @bi-lady-knight @ajtorres0 @failedcharacterherder  @emberparker @erethesilverking @veresiine-does-things @xlntwtch2 @whatnameshallitake @toni4eyes @aniveous @worldbvilding @lumist @travel-the-world13 @j-is-gonna-write-28 @aristokes @sassypandacandy @leopardsnake-stories @dahladahlabills @reece-alex-burton @swagjudgehandsdragon @reeseweston @kiraawrites @caphedenda @andiwriteunderthemoon @illthdar @closesttomyheart @ahivemindoftwelvecati @abalonetea @jfictitional @lacuna-stars @vivian-is-writing @mondkinder-sonnenkinder @acehorrorcryptid @siarven @wolfsong02 @pagesofcursive @incandescent-creativity @poore-choice-of-words @stardustspiral @euphoniouspandemonium @the-deciphered-narrator @lolannalisa @percy-writes @persephonejinmi @wildthingswrite @vellichor-virgo @kiljoytrout @mouwwie @baguettethebooklover @greygullhaven @violetwrite-blog @aligned-stars-writing @caprifoi @tetrilys @angstandagony @vampire-overlord @rainbow--memes @deadtower @gloriafrimpong @authortango @blindthewind @hauntedluminarybbq @josephinegerardywriter @primusesgiantmetalballbearings @introverteddumbass @thrcneofthorns @maramahan @jmhwriterblog @avi-burton-writing @goblingraveyard @pluttskutt @timefirewrites @veiliza @neo-lightchild-defenestrter  @caillevch-moved @elliotlpowell @thecartonizer @aquadestinyswriting @quenvicky @percabeth-stan-4-ever @lady-of-himring @easternstorms @albatris @inspirited-goddess @zmlorenz @lunarmoment @hypnoticwinter @dgwriteblr @escorble-writes @thenataliawrites @ribbons-halos @srw-writes​ @jilliancatherine @friendlyneighborhooddemon @rhikasa @world-of-skies @akindofmagictoo @sidebyside-withafriend @cierrasworld @brittany-diamond @22herondale @cwazytvthings @lxpinwrites @speakofthewrite @doggo038 @littlerothridinghood @imjustalonesomewritertwo @amywrites256 @chocolatehouse @theaberrantwritergirl @writingandsleeping @reality-schmality @aye-write @drbibliophile @literary-lavender @kirsten-is-writing

    #writeblr #writers of tumblr #writers on tumblr #my books #tnc the queen #ya fantasy#lgbt fantasy #FINALLY you guys
    View Full
  • oberlincollegelibraries
    07.03.2021 - 10 monts ago

    Weekend Edition: Women’s Prize for Fiction Winners

    The Women’s Prize for Fiction is a prize awarded annually for the best novel written in English by a woman and published in the UK during the previous year. And it just so happens that OCL holds all of the previous winners since the Prize started in 1996! Scroll below for links to all of the books. 

    2020 Winner Hamnet by Maggie O’Farrell "A thrilling departure: a short, piercing, deeply moving novel about the death of Shakespeare's 11 year old son Hamnet--a name interchangeable with Hamlet in 15th century Britain--and the years leading up to the production of his great play. England, 1580. A young Latin tutor--penniless, bullied by a violent father--falls in love with an extraordinary, eccentric young woman--a wild creature who walks her family's estate with a falcon on her shoulder and is known throughout the countryside for her unusual gifts as a healer. Agnes understands plants and potions better than she does people, but once she settles with her husband on Henley Street in Stratford she becomes a fiercely protective mother and a steadfast, centrifugal force in the life of her young husband, whose gifts as a writer are just beginning to awaken when his beloved young son succumbs to bubonic plague. A luminous portrait of a marriage, a shattering evocation of a family ravaged by grief and loss, and a hypnotic recreation of the story that inspired one of the greatest masterpieces of all time, Hamnet is mesmerizing, seductive, impossible to put down--a magnificent departure from one of our most gifted novelists"--Provided by publisher.

    2019 Winner An American Marriage by Tayari Jones Newlyweds Celestial and Roy are the embodiment of both the American Dream and the New South. He is a young executive and she is an artist on the brink of an exciting career. But as they settle into the routine of their life together, they are ripped apart by circumstances neither could have imagined. Roy is arrested and sentenced to twelve years for a crime Celestial knows he didn't commit. Though fiercely independent, Celestial finds herself bereft and unmoored, taking comfort in Andre, her childhood friend, and best man at their wedding. As Roy's time in prison passes, she is unable to hold on to the love that has been her center. After five years, Roy's conviction is suddenly overturned, and he returns to Atlanta ready to resume their life together.

    2018 Winner Home Fire by Kamila Shamsie "From an internationally acclaimed novelist, the suspenseful and heartbreaking story of a family ripped apart by secrets and driven to pit love against loyalty, with devastating consequences. Isma is free. After years of watching out for her younger siblings in the wake of their mother's death, an invitation from a mentor in America has allowed her to resume a dream long deferred. But she can't stop worrying about Aneeka, her beautiful, headstrong sister back in London, or their brother, Parvaiz, who's disappeared in pursuit of his own dream, to prove himself to the dark legacy of the jihadist father he never knew. When he resurfaces half the globe away, Isma's worst fears are confirmed. Then Eamonn enters the sisters' lives. Son of a powerful political figure, he has his own birthright to live up to--or defy. Is he to be a chance at love? The means of Parvaiz's salvation? Suddenly, two families' fates are inextricably, devastatingly entwined, in this searing novel that asks: What sacrifices will we make in the name of love?"-- Provided by publisher

    2017 Winner The Power by Naomi Alderman A rich Nigerian boy; a foster kid whose religious parents hide their true nature; an ambitious American politician; a tough London girl from a tricky family. When a vital new force takes root and flourishes, their lives converge with devastating effect. Teenage girls and women now have immense physical power-- they can cause agonizing pain and even death. And everything changes.

    Previous Winners 1996: A Spell of Winter by Helene Dunmore 1997: Fugitive Pieces by Anne Michaels 1998: Larry’s Party by Carol Shields  1999: A Crime in the Neighborhood by Suzanne Berne 2000: When I Lived in Modern Times by Linda Grant 2001: The Idea of Perfection by Kate Grenville 2002: Bel Canto by Ann Patchett 2003: Property by Valerie Martin 2004: Small Island by Andrea Levy  2005: We Need to Talk About Kevin by Lionel Shriver 2006: On Beauty by Zadie Smith 2007: Half of a Yellow Sun by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie 2008: The Road Home by Rose Tremain 2009: Home by Marilynne Robinson 2010: The Lacuna by Barbara Kingsolver 2011: The Tiger’s Wife by Téa Obreht 2012: The Song of Achilles by Madeline Miller 2013: May We Be Forgiven by A.M. Homes 2014: A Girl Is a Half-Formed Thing by Eimear McBride 2015: How to Be Both by Ali Smith 2016: The Glorious Heresies by Lisa McInerney

    #oberlin college libraries #ocl reading challenge #ocl bingo#book bingo #women's prize for fiction #reading challenge#weekend edition#female writers#women writers#oberlin college#OCLReads
    View Full