#mia mingus Tumblr posts

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    Each year I’ve lost friendships- many of them dropping like flies, many of them not being as vital as I made them out to be. It reminds me of the impermanence of life & the flexibility I actively work on in my life. Recently a very close friendship of mine came to the end of its road and I felt this so deeply for the reason being that we were the inseperable kind, able to exist in each other’s silence, and we carried the same burdens.

    After a few falling outs and trying to put the pieces back together I knew it was time to let go since we’ve outgrown eachother. In a way, we were no longer conducive to the wavelengths we were parting on. Nobody talks about how friendships also carry a type of love that is difficult to lay down.. It carries the same type of gut-wrenching grief of losing a loved one. Strangers again.

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    ID: tweets by Mia Mingus, @.miamingus, from June 7 2020 that read: “My ask to all organizers: if you create images to share, especially info graphics, please provide image descriptions along w graphic to download/share. It helps to remind people about access and allows them to make your content accessible. Disability justice is a practice.”

    “If you have a website for the campaign you’re sharing about, have the image descriptions right next to the graphic so folks can download/copy it. If not, put them in the caption or let folks know they can DM you for them. there’s such critical information being shared rn.”

    “this goes for videos too. please caption your videos. and whenever possible, share the most accessible version. no more of this, “DM me for the captioned version.” Stop this. If you have a captioned version of a video, then *that* is the one you should share.”

    “The revolution will be accessible or it’s no revolution at all.” End ID.

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  • “The most visionary work I have had the honor of witnessing and being part of has been work that has been grounded in love and the courage that love requires of us. Whether it is the courage to share our individual and collective anger with each other; the courage to take to the streets; the courage to build alternatives to the state; the courage to be vulnerable and humbled; or the courage to change ourselves for the better.”

    Mia Mingus, interviewed in BGD in 2016

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  • “I think we mistake anger for the antithesis of love, when in fact is a necessary part of love and what it means to be human in an inhumane world. I think it takes great love to be able to be angry with each other. And to be clear, I am talking about accountable anger, not abusive or malicious anger, but anger that is grounded and comes from a deep love for each other and ourselves. This kind of anger is a risk we take to be vulnerable with each other, to show who we really are and what truly matters to us. All of this, to me is love; and love is one of the greatest risks we can take.”

    Mia Mingus, interviewed in BGD in 2016:

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  • “As the (generational) effects of global capitalism, genocide, violence, oppression and trauma settle into our bodies, we must build new understandings of bodies and gender that can reflect our histories and our resiliency, not our oppressor or our self-shame and loathing. We must shift from a politic of desirability and beauty to a politic of ugly and magnificence. That moves us closer to bodies and movements that disrupt, dismantle, disturb. Bodies and movements ready to throw down and create a different way for all of us, not just some of us.

    The magnificence of a body that shakes, spills out, takes up space, needs help, moseys, slinks, limps, drools, rocks, curls over on itself. The magnificence of a body that doesn’t get to choose when to go to the bathroom, let alone which bathroom to use. A body that doesn’t get to choose what to wear in the morning, what hairstyle to sport, how they’re going to move or stand, or what time they’re going to bed. The magnificence of bodies that have been coded, not just undesirable and ugly, but un-human. The magnificence of bodies that are understanding gender in far more complex ways than I could explain in an hour. Moving beyond a politic of desirability to loving the ugly. Respecting Ugly for how it has shaped us and been exiled. Seeing its power and magic, seeing the reasons it has been feared. Seeing it for what it is: some of our greatest strength.”



    — Mia Mingus, Moving Toward the Ugly: A Politic Beyond Desirability

    #quote#mia mingus #read this speech!!
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  • Nomy Lamm. Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarasinha. Ellery Russian. Patty Berne. Mia Mingus. Seeley Quest. Leroy Moore. Mattilda Bernstein Sycamore. Frida Kahlo. Harriet Tubman. Laura Hersey. Stacey Milbern. Audre Lorde. Everyone who has ever worked with Sins Invalid and Deaf Poets’ Society. 

    Without you I would not have made it this far. 

    THANK YOU FROM THE BOTTOM OF MY BUSTED UP HEART.

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  • karalianne replied to your post: There are many ways to describe intima…

    I was hoping I could help but nope. Too academic and fluffy, not enough concreteness. I want to say it’s kind of like when someone knows what you need without you asking and just provides it as a matter of course, but I’m not sure.

    Yeah I’ve been reading through her writing more to get a feel for how she writes.  And she writes about a lot of really important stuff, stuff not everyone is writing about, very innovative things in many cases.  But there’s never, ever concrete examples.  She always talks in abstract generalities.  So that it’s almost like, you either already understand what she means, or you’re not going to understand it at all.  And that’s unfortunate, because with some concrete examples added, her writing could be accessible to a lot more disabled people.  And she’s saying very important stuff at times – things almost nobody is saying, so this is more important than usual, because it’s not like loads of people are duplicating her observations in more accessible language.

    Unfortunately, that may just be how she has to write.  I tend not to try to criticize people’s language too much because I know that I often can only write in certain ways, and I can’t always provide concrete examples either.  Sometimes the only way I can write about something is the way I wrote it, period, and that’s as good as it gets.  So I don’t want to put pressure on her to change her writing style, either, and I don’t want anyone to misconstrue this as that kind of pressure.

    I did leave a comment on that post though, asking whether she could provide examples, and describing what kind of examples would be helpful.  Not sure if I’ll get a reply or not but it’s worth a shot.

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  • Mia Mingus on Disability Justice (interview)

    “Disability Justice work is .. new in the sense that we’re building the shared political framework and shared language, so it’s also a very exciting time.” - Mia Mingus

    Disability Justice deals with the oppression of disability, but at the same time also deals with other systems of oppression and injustice - it is a ‘multi-issue politic.’ It moves beyond rights- and equality-based approaches, beyond access and inclusion in unjust systems, instead working towards collective justice and liberation, towards transforming society as a whole.

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  • She’s coming to UT and I’m going to just sweat in anticipation until that moment.

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  • Mia Mingus: why she kicks ass:

    • Mia Mingus is a queer physically disabled woman of color, Korean transracial and transnational adoptee.
    • She works as writer, organizer and community builder.
    • She does work to end sexual abuse through the organization generationFIVE.
    • In addition, Mingus was the co-founder of SPARK Reproductive Justice Now.
    • She has worked to create disability-accessible spaces for disabled and sick people (mainly activists).
    • Mingus also presents her work in different conferences and talks about the fight against racism, sexism, heterosexism, and ableism.
    • She encourages education for people who face discrimination and systematic oppression and raises awareness about the issues that these people face.
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