#michel foucault Tumblr posts

  • sibilla27vane
    25.01.2022 - 2 hours ago

    "Non immaginate che si debba essere tristi per essere militanti, anche se quello che si combatte è abominevole. È il legame del desiderio con la realtà a possedere una forza rivoluzionaria"

    Michel Foucault, dalla Prefaz. a L'Anti-Edipo di G. Deleuze e F. Guattari

    __________________________

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  • guiltyonsundays
    21.01.2022 - 4 days ago

    kill the cop in your mind

    #that is all #acab #soft michel foucault posting #things are like prisons etc etc etc #prison abolition #abolish the police #abolish prisons#michel foucault#the panopticon
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  • shoulderfm
    21.01.2022 - 4 days ago

    文明的衰落是規範取代冒險,警察取代海盜

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  • the-six-fingered-villain
    19.01.2022 - 6 days ago

    After initially checking it out from the library way back in August (and going in to renew it in person after the auto-renews ran out) I’ve finished The Archaeology of Knowledge by Foucault.

    Did I fully understand it? No. Did I enjoy it? Yes. I did need to be rather high in order to slog through a lot of it, but there were bits here and there that were fun. I’m a touch… sad? disappointed? that some of the ideas expressed feel similar to ideas of my own about… things. Modeling things. But I never wrote any of my thoughts down so it’s hard to compare/express. Part of what this book stirs in me is a conviction to record my own ideas, regardless of how little others may care about them.

    The parts of this that I enjoyed the most were the round about references to the relationship between a work and it’s record form (see: earlier quote I posted) and then sometimes the author.  For example:

    How unbearable it is, in view of how much of himself everyone wishes to put, thinks he is putting of ‘himself’ into his own discourse, when he speaks, how unbearable it is to cut up, analyze, combine, rearrange all these texts that have now returned from silence, without ever the transfigured face of the author appearing: ‘What! All those words, piled up one after another, all those marks made on all that paper and presented to innumerable pairs of eyes, all that concern to make them survive beyond the gesture that articulated them, so much piety expended in preserving them and inscribing them in men’s memories - all that and nothing remaining of the poor hand that traced them, of the anxiety that sought appeasement in them, of the completed life that has nothing but them to survive in?

    I really like that. [Except, you know, the use of the male pronoun. That sucks]

    Primarily enjoyed Part III : The Statement and the Archive (the enunciative function in particular pleased me) and then the conclusion of the Conclusion highlighted what I guess he was trying to express the whole time but I needed it condensed into a couple brief zingers. The above, and the following are what I continue to think about now that I’ve put the book aside (and have already picked up another by him). [longer quote behind the cut]

    Must I suppose that in my discourse I can have no survival? And that in speaking I am not banishing my death, but actually establishing it; or rather that I am abolishing all interiority in that exterior that is so indifferent to my life, and so neutral, that it makes no distinction between my life and my death?
    I understand the unease of all such people. … they prefer to deny that discourse is a complex, differentiated practice, governed by analyzable rules and transformations, rather than be deprived of that tender consoling certainty of being able to change, if not the world, if not life, at least their ‘meaning’, simply with a fresh word that can come only from themselves, and remain for ever close to the source. So many things have already eluded them in their language: they have no wish to see what they say go the same way;  at all costs, they must preserve that tiny fragment of discourse - whether written or spoken - whose fragile, uncertain existence must perpetuate their lives. They cannot bear (and one cannot but sympathize) to hear someone saying: ‘Discourse is not life; its time is not your time; in it, you will not be reconciled to death; you may have killed God beneath the weight of all that you have said; but don’t imagine that, with all that you are saying, you will make a man that will live longer than he.’

    And that’s how the book ends. As someone who doesn’t really participate in “discourse” - academic or on Tumblr - I feel removed from the overall subject but interested as one is in the activities of their peers. Are these the games that others play when talking about things and to each other?

    #reading#book review #the archeology of knowledge #michel foucault
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  • garadinervi
    19.01.2022 - 6 days ago

    Gilles Deleuze, What is a Dispositif?, [Michel Foucault philosophe, Rencontre internationale, Paris, 9, 10, 11 janvier 1988; Seuil, Paris, 1989], in Two Regimes of Madness. Texts and Interviews 1975-1995, Edited by David Lapoujade, Translated by Ames Hodges and Mike Taormina, Semiotext(e), Columbia University, New York, NY, 2006, pp. 338-348

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  • garadinervi
    19.01.2022 - 6 days ago

    Gilles Deleuze, Foucault and Prison, in Two Regimes of Madness. Texts and Interviews 1975-1995, Edited by David Lapoujade, Translated by Ames Hodges and Mike Taormina, Semiotext(e), Columbia University, New York, NY, 2006, pp. 272-281

    Note «Editors title. The text initially appeared with the title 'The Intellectual and Politics: Foucault and the Prison’, an interview by Paul Rabinow and Keith Gandal for History of the Present, 2, Spring 1986, p. 1-2, 20-21. Eng trans, Paul Rabinow. The version presented here was established from the transcription of the original recordings and sometimes differs from the [first] American presentation.» – p. 407
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  • garadinervi
    19.01.2022 - 6 days ago

    Gilles Deleuze, Michel Foucault’s Main Concepts, in Two Regimes of Madness. Texts and Interviews 1975-1995, Edited by David Lapoujade, Translated by Ames Hodges and Mike Taormina, Semiotext(e), Columbia University, New York, NY, 2006, pp. 241-260 (pt. 2) (pt. 1 here)

    Note «Written after the death of Foucault in 1984, this article appears to be a first version of what would later become ‘Foucault‘. The type-written manuscript has editorial corrections, suggesting Deleuze's intention to publish it. The course Deleuze gave at Saint-Denis in 1985-1986, as well as the text he was working on at that time, finally discouraged him from publishing this article. The first few paragraphs show up in ‘Foucault’, though with substantial additions (cf. the chapter on strata, pp. 55-75). The rest of the article was left aside, except for a few passages here and there.» – p. 406
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  • garadinervi
    19.01.2022 - 6 days ago

    Gilles Deleuze, Michel Foucault’s Main Concepts, in Two Regimes of Madness. Texts and Interviews 1975-1995, Edited by David Lapoujade, Translated by Ames Hodges and Mike Taormina, Semiotext(e), Columbia University, New York, NY, 2006, pp. 241-260 (pt. 1) (pt. 2 here)

    Note «Written after the death of Foucault in 1984, this article appears to be a first version of what would later become ‘Foucault‘. The type-written manuscript has editorial corrections, suggesting Deleuze's intention to publish it. The course Deleuze gave at Saint-Denis in 1985-1986, as well as the text he was working on at that time, finally discouraged him from publishing this article. The first few paragraphs show up in ‘Foucault’, though with substantial additions (cf. the chapter on strata, pp. 55-75). The rest of the article was left aside, except for a few passages here and there.» – p. 406
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  • laviedavantgarde
    19.01.2022 - 6 days ago

    Reading Foucault but as a graduate student:

    #personal #avant's adventures in grad school #michel foucault #it's theory time
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  • gabriel-sabo
    17.01.2022 - 1 week ago
    #michel foucault #genealogía del racismo #cuarta lección
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  • gabriel-sabo
    17.01.2022 - 1 week ago
    #michel foucault #genealogía del racismo #cuarta lección
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  • gabriel-sabo
    17.01.2022 - 1 week ago
    #michel foucault #genealogía del racismo #cuarta lección
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  • cambria-press
    15.01.2022 - 1 week ago

    Book Review: "Philosophy and Criticism in Latin America" by Mabel Moraña

    Book Review: “Philosophy and Criticism in Latin America” by Mabel Moraña

    “Mabel Moraña’s extensive commentaries on cultural emancipation in Latin America are a notable contribution to scholarship on that region’s sociocultural development. … From José Carlos Mariátegui, Enrique Dussel, Bolívar Echeverría, and Roger Bartra to global thinkers such as Michel Foucault, Walter Benjamin, and Pierre Bourdieu, Moraña takes her readers on a tour-de-force voyage through…

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  • austinpowersfancam
    15.01.2022 - 1 week ago

    Me and my mutuals psychoanalyzing the beatles on discord

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  • replicated
    13.01.2022 - 1 week ago
    Like Western democracy, Soviet socialism was part of modernity. Foucault stressed that even such "pathological forms" of power as Stalinism and fascism, "in spite of their historical uniqueness... are not quite original. They used and extended mechanisms already present in most other societies... [and] used to a large extent the ideas and the devices of our political rationality" (Foucault 1983, 209). As a modern project, Soviet socialism shared the key contradictions of modernity.
    One of the central contradictions of socialism is a version of what Claude Lefort called a general paradox within the ideology of modernity: the split between ideological emmuciation (which reflects the theological ideals of the Enlightenment) and ideological rule (manifest in the practical concerns of the modern state's political authority). The paradox, that we will call "Lefort's paradox," lies in the fact that ideological rule must be "abstracted from any question concerning its origins", thus remaining outside of ideological enunciation and, as a result, rendering that enunciation deficient. In other words, to fulfill its political function of reproducing power, the ideological discourse must claim to represent an "objective truth" that exists outside of it; however, the external nature of this "objective truth" renders the ideological discourse inherently lacking in the means to describe it in total... This inherent contradiction of any version of modern ideology, argues Lefort, can be concealed only by the figure of the "master", who, by being presented as standing outside ideological discourse and possessing external knowledge of the objective truth, conceals the contradiction by allowing it "to appear through himself" (1986, 211-12). In other words, modern ideological discourse, based on utopian ideals of the Enlightenment, gains its legitimacy from an imaginary position that is external to it and will experience a crisis of legitimacy if that external position is questioned or destroyed.
    (This version of Lefort's paradox can be compared with how it plays itself out in late capitalism. For example, Susan Bordo argues that enunciations and practices of capitalist ideology put the Western subject in a "double bind" between, on the one hand, a workaholic ethic and repression of consumer desire and, on the other, the capitulation to desire and achievement of immediate satisfaction. Bordo attributes the unprecedented epidemia of anorexia and bulimia in the West, in the 1980s and 90s partly to the intensification of this double bind)
    - Alexei Yurchak, Everything Was Forever, Until It Was No More: The Last Soviet Generation
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  • thehedgehogs-dilemma
    10.01.2022 - 2 weeks ago

    oscar wilde // michel foucault // gabriele d'annunzio

    #I love that they're all saying the same things but with a compleatly different personality. wilde is witty while foucault is more #rational or serious. d'annunzio instead has a stronger sense of duty towards his beliefs. I would say. kinda typical of him #idk what this is. I just like this concept very much and I love to see the same things said differently. much of literature works that way #all art probably works that way. you have one thing that many other people have expressed already but you have to find the way you want to #express it. and maybe one day you'll reach people who would have said the same way. people with a soul like yours. maybe in a different era #from alessandro d'avenia: ‹‹poetry is a message in a bottle. living on the hope of a dialogue deferred in time›› #art#aesthetism#life#oscar wilde#michel foucault#gabriele d'annunzio #the picture of dorian gray #il piacere #life imitates art #art quotes#decadence#dark academia #dark academia quotes #art academia#light academia#romantic academia#romanticism#quotes#life quote#self#identity#dark academism#literature#theuserdilemma
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  • gabriel-sabo
    03.01.2022 - 3 weeks ago
    #michel foucault #genealogía del racismo
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  • professionalcoaching
    01.01.2021 - 3 weeks ago

    Natalie and John: A Narrative Perspective on the Past and Present Dilemmas and Opportunities Facing Organizational Coaching

    Natalie and John: A Narrative Perspective on the Past and Present Dilemmas and Opportunities Facing Organizational Coaching

    [Note: This essay first appeared in a 2009 issue (No. One) of the International Journal of Coaching in Organizations]  SETTING THE STAGE Natalie has been an organizational coach for the past eight years, having served for many years as Vice President of HR for a medium-sized high-tech firm in the Twin Cities. She met John at a Habitat for Humanities meeting several years ago. They struck up a…

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  • athousandrabbitholes
    30.12.2021 - 3 weeks ago
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