#stigma Tumblr posts

  • “it’s all in your head” “well what part of your body did you think it was in?’

    is really helpful if i’m being gaslighted, thanks🙄

    #validation #that doesn't improve material reality for most ppl #mental health#awareness#mental illness#actuallymentallyill #actually mentally ill #gaslight/ing#stigma #mental health stigma #ableism
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  • nothing irks me more than when people with mental illness are referred to as ‘suffering from mental health’ babe i WISH i had mental health

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  • My journey towards recovery seemed unsurmountable and I was truly walking into the unknown. Would the voices ever subside? Would I be psychotic for the rest of my life? Could I ever manage to stay sober? These were daunting questions for an addicted/Schizoaffective LMFT trying to get well. The reality of my situation may easily have taken me to a mental health unit but by the grace of God I was sent to Casa Treatment Center. Luckily, I was adept at hiding my mental state from those around me and this was to my benefit when I needed to act “as if” and push through the discomfort of growth.

    The clinicians at Casa taught me to measure success by my own design, not by someone else’s standards. There were times when a monumental day was lifting my head in group and responding to a question from the group facilitator. Due to years of drug use and an untreated mental health condition I experienced a lack of emotional affect and an inability to concentrate, comprehend and process information.  The nagging issue of accessing language kept others from seeing who I truly was.  On most days my mind was blank, no emotions to connect with and no words to share. Thanks to depression, many days I felt as if my body was bathed in concrete and every movement was its own victory. Casa educated me on the importance of treating both my mental health and substance use disorder with medication, therapy and support groups.  It was the patience from staff that made all the difference. Listening to others who offered hope and acceptance was the driving force of healing. Sitting with others who faced similar challenges and were transparent gave me strength and filled a space of true connection to the world around me. Casa has no shortage of hope, empathy and silent support.  I could show up, voices and all, and the community at Casa would support me and keep me safe. I learned how to live a full life at Casa. I learned how to take risks, realize my dreams, live in acceptance, sit in discomfort, and love the “imperfect” me.

    Today, I am the Clinical Director at Casa Treatment Center. The same treatment center I arrived at 7 years ago. If you told me this in my early recovery I would never have believed it. Every mountain I climbed now makes sense to me. My difficult journey was for a reason. Don’t give up before the miracle happens!

     

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  • This is my story.

    This is hard for me to talk about, because I don’t talk about my mental health.
    When I was in the womb my father say he didn’t want me, he would rather sign over his rights. Then when I was about five my mom went to him to see if he would be in my life. Well he never was in my life. I felt like I wasn’t good enough. I wish he would have been part of my life but he didn’t attempted to connect with me for 11 years. I keep think I wasn’t good enough and why he didn’t want me. I thought when I was like 17 I would try to connect with him, but when I was 16 he took his life to suicide. He suffered from depression and in the end it won. Because of not being wanted by him. As I got older and still to this day I think I’m not good enough for anyone.

    Thanks to watching some great TikToks that prompted mental health. I know I’m good enough and I Matter Most.

    I hope my story inspires more people to know that they are not alone and it’s ok not to be ok. Mental health is something we need to talk about.

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  • We need to eradicate stigma from the psychiatrist’s office. One way to do this would be to drop diagnoses which already carry too much stigma. We could consider these diagnoses not fit for purpose. For example, a diagnosis I do not have is Borderline Personality Disorder which has recently been changed to Emotionally Unstable Personality Disorder. There has been much criticism of the name of this disorder with many individuals voicing their discomfort with the label ‘Personality Disorder.’ A fellow student at my undergrad institution conducted a study which found psychiatrists were much more sympathetic when the same patients had a diagnosis of PTSD than when they held a diagnosis of BPD. Yet we know that the vast majority of people with a BPD diagnosis have a history of trauma. Because “dissociation” is poorly understood in society professionals frequently stigmatise individuals with trauma histories and still hold unacceptable prejudices such as that people with BPD are manipulative and vengeful, when there is no basis at all to these accusations. People with the label BPD are empathetic individuals who have PTSD. Why do we not then give them a more validating diagnosis like that one? Since all their pain and difficulty in life stems from trauma. People with BPD are never manipulative or vengeful. They believe their reality at the time and often isolate themselves from people they find difficult or painful. We cannot give these people, often with complex PTSD, meaningful treatment until we admit that the diagnosis Emotional Unstable Personality Disorder carries too much stigma to be acceptable to the APA, and therefore should not appear in the DSM. It is also a misunderstanding of the difficulties people with trauma experience. It is clear that trauma should be central to any diagnosis given to these people. But I also believe that diagnosis should be a consensual act and that service users should be able to be part of the discussion before a diagnosis is decided upon.

    I want to continue with this argument, that psychiatry and the medical profession should be about alleviating pain and not adding to pain or imposing its own reality upon individuals. This is not an easy argument to make. But I fully believe it is the direction of a more progressive society which makes service users high status and collaborative partners in their treatment. Intervoice petitioned decision makers to consider changing the diagnoses related to voice hearing such as Schizophrenia and Schizoaffective Disorder. They also wrote an open letter to the English mental health charity Rethink questioning the validity of the diagnosis Schizophrenia and asking them to reconsider the language of their advocacy. This was a very brave act. I agree with them. I think we should reconceptualise voice hearing and how we respond to people who hear voices or those having other experiences. If we made the diagnoses more validating and more accurate we would realise that people who have these experiences are normal people. This would be a first step in raising the status of people who experience psychosis or voice hearing or other experiences. It is important therefore that diagnosis is not imposed upon an individual but emerges as part of a discussion between the individual and psychiatry. 

    People who hear voices or who have other experiences are normal people. There is always a reason why they believe the things they do. That reason may be organic but it is not irrational. They are having a rich and complex experience. The idea that they are strange or irrational is from the dark ages. Anyone who has experienced psychosis could, if empowered, enlighten society about this. Just like people who have BPD always have a reason for their emotions and their reactions, people with psychosis have good reason to believe the things they experience. It is their experience after all. Society must realise these people are normal and not stigmatise them. The existing labels for psychosis all stigmatise because they refer to “unusual beliefs.” But that is the wrong way around. They are often unusual experiences and understandable reactions and beliefs. It will take a lot of research to change this way of seeing psychosis but it must change in the future.

    We live in a time of ‘wokeness.’ What is being ‘woke’ about? It is about many things but mainly allowing marginalised people to assume their own identities and choose their own labels. It is important that in the future people with mental health difficulties choose their own labels and that diagnosis is a consensual act. We need research (but we need a wholly different kind of research that works with and not against service users). Individuals have important insights and we must not lose sight of this. Service users should work with the APA to conceive of validating diagnoses that are therapeutic, that heal rather than harm. And if an individual does not want a diagnosis that should be respected too. Some people might not want to be diagnosed with Autism for example. That should be respected. I know this is radical thinking but I know it is the direction of the future. Professionals can draw ideas from research but they need to act reflexively to the needs of the service user who is not the enemy but an empathic and wise person. Let them define who they are and then develop the tools to help them achieve their recovery. If you can do this you can help them heal.

    We need a collaborative approach to diagnosis and we need to include service users as problem solvers. If you apply intelligence and good sense to this way of conceptualising mental health then you would end up changing the culture of mental health care around the world.

    #important insights#diagnosis#stigma #collaborative problem solving
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  • *TRIGGER WARNING*

    My childhood was not the easiest by any means. I grew up with 1 sister living home and my parents. I started experiencing abuse at the age of 4 by a family member but was too afraid to speak out. At about 12 years old I developed an eating disorder. It got pretty bad and I ended up inpatient. I was put on a bunch of different medications because I was diagnosed with depression and anxiety and many other things. I didn’t open up about the abuse then either though. It wasn’t until my senior year when I was in my 3rd treatment center that my girlfriend at the time sent me a letter saying this family member of mine had abused her that I finally spoke up. But my family all came together and targeted me because they were mad so I dropped my charges. Around this same time I had opened up about another authority figure in my life hurting me my uncle had passed away which really took a toll on me. I struggled tremendously with my depression after this and attempted suicide a few times. But what really helped me was sticking to therapy and learning how to cope with my trauma and creating my own little family and realizing that their all I need. They helped me tremendously and I know where to turn for help. Please do be afraid to reach out and please speak up if someone is hurting you. Use your voice!

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  • so disappointed in sia’s comment about bpd, i really liked her music :/

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  • I had noble plans for this website. I expected a post per week in the form of a blog or flash fiction. In my defense, I’ve started dozens of posts. A tiny fraction of them made it to publication.

    I am depressed and anxious and have been for decades. The state of the world hasn’t helped. I feel my words here should reflect the serious topics hanging over society, but I’m too angry and frustrated to write something coherent. If a person wants to read a rant, Twitter and Facebook accounts are more than sufficient.


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    And so this site lies fallow.

    But maybe it would be better to leave the world behind here. We can take a break from the doom and gloom and only peek into that aspect of our lives every so often. Maybe this place can be a respite from the political cluster-fuck the world has become.


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    This doesn’t mean my coming posts will be frivolous. Sure, I’ll post the story of the latest silly cat picture. The topics on my mind are serious, such as the depiction of mental health in entertainment. All of my fiction has characters recovering from trauma and disorders. Most people love a good psychological thriller—hell, so many people voted for Trump because “it wouldn’t be boring”. But we have so many stories of sociopaths, narcissists, and psychopaths. What about those of us with depression that doesn’t make us kill, anxiety that only affects our job, and OCD that manifests as intruding thoughts rather than Sleeping With the Enemy abuse?

    We all love crazy, unless it’s in a high-functioning form. An anxious person needs to just get over it. A depressed person needs to just not let it bother them. I sat at the dinner table once and listened to someone complain about a woman with bipolar. They referred to her as lazy when she doesn’t have the legal capacity to manage her own money. But if she “just got over it” she could certainly get a job.

    I want stories about the everyday mental health disorders that we feel we need to conceal. So that’s what I write. “Write the stories you want to read,” is the advice usually given.

    I plan to be here more often. I’ll post about books I’m reading and movies I’m watching, all with the depiction of mental health in mind.

    Plus the occasional cat picture story… because that’s mental health too.

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  • Hey everyone, this is a short video explaining the psychology of lockdown, obviously very relevant to all of us currently, very interesting! Remember folks, mental health affects everyone, so let’s talk about it. 💕

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  • *trigger warning*

    I’m 26 years young , I’ll be 27 in 2 weeks. I’m a single mom to a 9 yr old, a 2 year old and 1 year old. I was diagnosed with Bipolar disorder in 2015. Raised in the hood. No father, no love from family. I feel like all I have is God and my children. I began loving myself, getting closer to God, praying, walking away, crying instead of cutting, 2 suicide attempts, 4 scars for life. I have been on medication, but now I’m not. I’ve had 19 jobs. I’m trying so hard to seek help. But it’s like no one cares , they just want to throw you in a hospital. 

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  • I would like to start by saying that I was diagnosed with PTSD, Major Depressive disorder,  and Anxiety disorder. I remember when I first found out that what I was going through had a name. It made me feel good that I could call it something. I always wondered what people saw when they called me crazy. Then I was too embarrassed to tell anyone about what I found out. I was 26 yes old and I am now 49. It has taken me this long to feel open about it and would like to help as many people as I can to feel comfortable.  You are not alone their are a lo ft of us out there and we have so much love in our hearts.  Hopefully this makes you feel better and puts hope back in your eyes.

    Diane

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  • *TRIGGER WARNING*

    This is my story.

    This is hard for me to talk about, because I don’t talk about my mental health.
    When I was in the womb my father say he didn’t want me, he would rather sign over his rights. Then when I was about five my mom went to him to see if he would be in my life. Well he never was in my life. I felt like I wasn’t good enough. I wish he would have been part of my life but he didn’t attempted to connect with me for 11 years. I keep think I wasn’t good enough and why he didn’t want me. I thought when I was like 17 I would try to connect with him, but when I was 16 he took his life to suicide. He suffered from depression and in the end it won. Because of not being wanted by him. As I got older and still to this day I think I’m not good enough for anyone.

    Thanks to watching some great TikToks that prompted mental health. I know I’m good enough and I Matter Most.

    I hope my story inspires more people to know that they are not alone and it’s ok not to be ok. Mental health is something we need to talk about.

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  • They’re not the same, drug addiction/substance abuse isn’t funny, and people feel ashamed of themselves for taking Adderall when they’re lead to believe it’s the same as meth. Knock it off.

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