#theology Tumblr posts

  • demoisveryselfish
    12.05.2021 - 8 hours ago

    Theology thought:

    Let us run with the assumption that God is infinitely powerful in some way. (I am not convinced as to Gods Omnipotence or Omniscience, but I am more willing to go with a God that is in some way, infinite). Mathematics tells us that there are infinities bigger than other infinities.

    What does that say about God then?

    I have no idea. I would have to think about it.

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  • beguines
    12.05.2021 - 8 hours ago
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  • pastorbluejeansunplugged
    12.05.2021 - 11 hours ago

    Message of the Day: Cherish and Cultivate the Graces Which the Spirit Produces

    Message of the Day: Cherish and Cultivate the Graces Which the Spirit Produces

    “For those who live according to the flesh set their minds on the things of the flesh, but those who live according to the Spirit, the things of the Spirit.” (Romans 8:15, NKJV) Efforts to keep the law cannot produce righteousness, because the sinful nature is so bad it cannot be cured, or even improved. It can only be condemned to destruction, and Christ did this by his death on the cross.…

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  • lesbianveronica
    12.05.2021 - 11 hours ago

    there's some particular aspects of how growing up an evangelical christian affected my brain that i need to unpack and probably get rid of to be a mentally healthy person and have not done yet simply because i dont know what it would mean for my theology. like i think i'd be fine but also i worry it'd be the thing that's Too Far.

    #thinking it's Too Far is probably also part of growing up evangelical lmao #i do rest easy knowing that im going to finish seminary no matter what #even if i end up with theology that is too 'out there' to be considered christian anymore #i really need to latch onto a professor and make them talk about it with me
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  • beguines
    11.05.2021 - 14 hours ago

    I do not think anyone should be surprised that an American Christianity that hasn't developed a significant moral stance on—let alone any kind of institutional response to—the history of violent colonization and genocide within (and supported by) the United States reacts with the same moral tepidity to Israeli occupation of Palestine. This is the same American Christianity that refuses to address antisemitism in any meaningful way, which really exemplifies that their support of the state of Israel has nothing to do with supporting Jewish people, but with keeping their values aligned with state power.

    Support of state sanctioned violence is our legacy. It is why our churches are built upon this ground. It is why—and how—Christianity wields so much political influence in the United States. We have to address and grapple with these issues in order to form a theology that is able to react adequately to systems of oppression. Institutional Christianity has been doing the theological and moral equivocation to justify colonialism and violence for centuries. That even more progressive denominations refuse to take action or even unequivocal moral stands should not come as a shock.

    The theology produced by the institution is what the individual inevitably consumes. Theology matters. It directly impacts the way we see ourselves and others, the way we view situations, and subsequently the way we act. It ceases to be abstraction and becomes manifest in policy, in public opinion, in individual action. So many of us take strides to educate ourselves and differentiate our theology from that which was regurgitated to us in churches or by our families, but we cannot completely divorce ourselves from the institution of American Christianity. It is our responsibility to hold our religion accountable for the damage it has done and continues to do.

    It is our moral responsibility to witness, to not look away. It is our moral responsibility to act. To actively combat the ways that antisemitism manifests itself in our theology and our communities. To educate ourselves about the historical and social conditions of anticolonial struggle. To learn about and partake in meaningful action, like the boycott, divestment, and sanctions movement. The genocide and occupation of Palestine is not a religious issue—to paint it as such is to deliberately ignore the reality of colonial violence, erase the multiplicity of Palestinian identity, and ignore the tangible negative effects of Zionism on Jewish people as well—but it is an issue to which religion is obligated to respond.

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  • rolkientolkien
    11.05.2021 - 15 hours ago
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  • musicgoon
    11.05.2021 - 16 hours ago

    Book Review: A Brief Theology of Periods (Yes, really) by Rachel Jones

    Why did God give women periods? In A Brief Theology of Periods (Yes, really), Rachel Jones takes us on an adventure for the curious into bodies, womanhood, time, pain and purpose—and shares how to have a better time of the month! This book lives up to its title by presenting a brief theology of periods that is unique to womanhood and purposeful by God.

    Fearfully and Wonderfully Made

    Periods show us how God designed us. Women are fearfully and wonderfully made. While not being overly scientific, Jones explains what is actually happening with our bodies during the menstrual cycle. It is a display of God’s glory and should cause us to worship and wonder at our Creator. 

    Periods are also a way to display how God showcases complementarian beauty in that women are a “weaker vessel.” The book of Leviticus presents a problem as the issue of cleanliness is discussed, but Jones puts it in proper perspective by hearing what Jesus has to say to the woman with uncontrolled bleeding.

    Nothing but the Blood

    What impressed me the most was by how much Jones was able to show that the Bible actually has a lot to say about periods. With feelings and emotions that are constantly shifting, Jones encourages us to differentiate between what we feel and what we say.

    Our bodies are timepieces in the sense that menopause and the ability to have children remind us of our creatureness. Jones reminds us that blood stains are difficult to remove, and we are reminded of the blood of Jesus that freely flows to wash away our sins.

    Biology and Theology

    A Q&A section is included at the end of the book with excellent questions including “Is it ok for Christians today to have sex while the wife is on her period?” and “Is it ok to use hormonal birth control to regulate my periods or treat pain?” I found her answers to be persuasive.

    I am especially grateful for this book as it does not seek to separate our biology from our theology. I am glad to have this book to help me live with my wife in an understanding way. Our bodies are created by God to be special, beautiful, and wonderful.

    I received a media copy of A Brief Theology of Periods (Yes, really) and this is my honest review. Find more of my book reviews and follow Dive In, Dig Deep on Instagram - my account dedicated to Bibles and books to see the beauty of the Bible and the role of reading in the Christian life. To read all of my book reviews and to receive all of the free eBooks I find on the web, subscribe to my free newsletter.

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  • yieldfruit
    11.05.2021 - 19 hours ago
    "But you must remember, beloved, the predictions of the apostles of our Lord Jesus Christ. They said to you, 'In the last time there will be scoffers, following their own ungodly passions.' It is these who cause divisions, worldly people, devoid of the Spirit. But you, beloved, building yourselves up in your most holy faith and praying in the Holy Spirit, keep yourselves in the love of God, waiting for the mercy of our Lord Jesus Christ that leads to eternal life. And have mercy on those who doubt; save others by snatching them out of the fire; to others show mercy with fear, hating even the garment stained by the flesh. Now to him who is able to keep you from stumbling and to present you blameless before the presence of his glory with great joy, to the only God, our Savior, through Jesus Christ our Lord, be glory, majesty, dominion, and authority, before all time and now and forever. Amen." Jude 1:17-25 ESV
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  • stravvberrysaurus
    11.05.2021 - 19 hours ago

    "please for the love of god, stop educating yourself and go watch tv or something" - my mother @ me

    #i put myself on an archaeology/anthropology/theology project
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  • vbc66
    11.05.2021 - 19 hours ago

    The Christian in Complete Armor: Chapter 4 Pt 1

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  • vbc66
    11.05.2021 - 20 hours ago

    Christian Nationalism and 33O A.D.

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  • transhermetic-witchery
    11.05.2021 - 21 hours ago

    Refusing to rest in endless pool. Why, why do I, do we, keep on? Yes, each trickles from one above, and to one (at least) adown, so seems it progress made by upstream crawl. Do we fear if comfort find will sink, will drown? But, and here's the kick, is it round and round, Escher's waterfall or do we find streamhead dry and flop and flam cus can't yet breathe on land?

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  • anaxerneas
    11.05.2021 - 1 day ago

    David F. Ford, Theology

    #david f. ford #theology#religion
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  • beguines
    10.05.2021 - 1 day ago
    But Western Christianity claims we are saved by the execution, that violence and terror reveal the grace of God. This claim isolates Jesus, as violence isolates its victims. When the victims of violence are made singular, solitary, unprecedented in their pain, the power of violence remains.
    Jesus' death was not unique. The torture inflicted on Jesus had been visited on many. It continues in the world, masked by the words "virtuous suffering" and "self-sacrificing love."
    We cannot say what would have happened if Jesus had not been murdered, but unjust, violent death is traumatizing. His community retained the scars and limitations of those who survive violence. Christianity bears the marks of unresolved trauma. Jesus' resurrection and the continuation of his movement are not triumphs, but a glimpse of the power of survival, of the embers that survive the deluge. To know that the presence of God endures through violence is to know life holds more than its destruction. The power of life is strong. Salvation is sometimes possible.

    Rita Nakashima Brock and Rebecca Ann Parker, Proverbs of Ashes: Violence, Redemptive Suffering, and the Search for What Saves Us

    #rita nakashima brock #rebecca ann parker #proverbs of ashes #feminist theology#theology
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  • pastorbluejeansunplugged
    10.05.2021 - 1 day ago

    Message of the Day: We Are United With Christ, We Are Controlled By The Holy Spirit

    Message of the Day: We Are United With Christ, We Are Controlled By The Holy Spirit

    “There is therefore now no condemnation to those who are in Christ Jesus, who do not walk according to the flesh, but according to the Spirit. For the law of the Spirit of life in Christ Jesus has made me free from the law of sin and death.” (Romans 8:1-2, NKJV) The reason that we can have victory through Christ is that the power of the indwelling Spirit of Christ is greater than the power of…

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  • beguines
    10.05.2021 - 1 day ago
    For centuries, Christian theology imagined God's supremacy as a supremacy of separateness. Karl Barth described God's relationship to the world like a tangent to a circle. Christ is the one point of contact between the earthly and the divine. God's freedom was his impassability—his ability to be unaffected by the world. God's radical otherness remains a strong tenet of much theology. These theologies have been rightly criticized for supporting the ascendancy of patriarchal values of dispassion and independence. In the twentieth century, the theological pendulum swung the other way. Theology described a God who could feel—a relational, connected, empathetic God, who suffers with us. God's love for us was expressed in his union with Jesus in experiencing abandonment and pain. But this theology has sometimes valorized empathetic union without distinguishing it from abuse.

    Rita Nakashima Brock and Rebecca Ann Parker, Proverbs of Ashes: Violence, Redemptive Suffering, and the Search for What Saves Us

    #rita nakashima brock #rebecca ann parker #proverbs of ashes #feminist theology#theology
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