#white balance Tumblr posts

  • Kelvin scale for white balance

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    Clean

    #white balance#photography #home & lifestyle
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  • FCPX Color Correction made EASY Part 2: Correcting White Balance

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  • White balance works by adjusting the amount of sensitivity between colours. It can for example make a picture have more warm or more cold colours. And it can make colours more visable and or more real.

    The white balance setting normal has the letter K and the lower the K the more warm colours (towards red) and the higher the K the more cold colours (towards blue).

    And there’s no impact on the sensor.

    By JK, Jef Koelewijn

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  • The light’s temperature or color is the first characteristic of light that we have to address within the camera’s settings before we shoot. The setting is called ‘white balance’ and typically has options for ‘daylight’, ‘incandescent’, ‘florescent’, ‘cloudy’, etc. Each of these settings attempts to modify the camera’s interpretation of the scene and compensate for the color of the light based on an average of ‘cloudy’ (or whatever) light color.  They do a decent job but the problem with these settings is that there are only a handful of them and actual light temperature/color is a massive range (Lightroom supports values from 2000 up to 50,000). (Most cameras have an ‘auto’ white balance setting and from my experience it seems to do a decent job under normal conditions.)

    A better way to address white balance is to set your camera to capture in ‘raw’ format and address the matter in post processing. Not all cameras can store images in raw format so this may not be an option for you. Once you choose to save in raw format the white balance setting can be ignored (still it’s probably best to set it to ‘auto’) and all color correction can be performed in post processing using software. While this process relies on you the editor to visually get the right color balance you’ll probably be able to tune the image better than using only the handful of settings built into your camera. 

    The best way to address white balance is to capture in ‘raw’ and include a ‘color card’ in a test shot of the subject. Color cards are small 3x5ish items that include a number of small squares of precise reference colors, including true white. The test shot can then be loaded into your post processing application and the color card can be used to set the reference for true white. The software then chooses the right white balance to achieve true white for that square on the color card. The white balance settings can then be quickly duplicated across the other images in that shoot. This process, while a bit more fiddly, ensures an accurate and precise white balance setting. If you need a high degree of color accuracy in your images, this is the way to go. 

    (A quick search at Amazon for “photo color checker” turns up a long list of color cards, several that include more than one ‘white’ which can be helpful to fine tune the white balance.)

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    (Rio Grande Depot, Salt Lake City, UT; Canon 5DMII, TS-E45, 1.6s, f10, ISO 400)

    (White balance adjustments can be made on a non-raw image (jpg, etc.) but are not as extensive as with raw format images. If your camera can’t save in raw format your best option is to get as close as you can in-camera and then fine tune the color balance in software.)

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  • Chobi. Beyond the door:) 

    Source

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  • White balance is accomplished into our head as a particularly abstruse factor to regulate in our images and not, in reality, something we will spend creatively beyond, warmer or cooler" however there are such a lot of creative possibilities accessible.

    Keep reading

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  • Mostly overlooked camera settings : white balance : photography basic

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    Canon Spiegelreflexkamera EOS2000D

    Weißabgleich wird die Farbtemperatur eingestellt.

    Von warmen zu kalten Farbentemparaturen

    Es wird in Kelvin gemessen

    1. AWB (automatischer Weißabgleich)

    2. Taglicht ca. 5200K

    3. Schatten ca. 7000K

    4. wolkig ca. 6000K

    5. Kunstlicht ca. 3200K

    6. Leuchtstoff ca. 4000K

    7. Blitz

    8. Manuell (selber einstellen)

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  • White balance task

    20.1.19

    I went out today to do my white balance task. I did the best I could with the limited knowledge I have. Usually I use auto white balance and change it in post production if it’s needed. I done the task as best as I could. ( I am unable at this point to put the photos in as my laptop is not working and not accepting my memory card. I will add them as and when it’s fixed.

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  • Jessops

    26.1.19

    Today I went into jessops Photogrphy shop for help with my white balance setting in my camera. They were unable to help, even the Nikon specialist did not know how to do it. I will carry on with it in the best way I can.

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  • White balance

    27.1.19

    Today I was playing around with the white balance in my camera, and have discovered that I do not have a custom setting or daylight !! I have watched a YTube video using a grey card but have no idea how to then put that into the camera. I have spent so much time trying to work out the white that I have run out of time to do my backlit portrait. I am goi g into jessops tomorrow to see if they can help me

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  • During the third session, I learnt more information when shooting with the camera, these include shot sizes, framing and white balance, which is closely linked to the Kelvin scale. To start I will be looking at the different visual elements. When working with different shots its ideal to know the correct terminology.

    Extreme Close up – Gets very close to your subject and shows extreme detail. Can be used to show emotion.

    Close Up – Shows expression but in less detail. Can be used to show an action. 

    Medium Close Up – Halfway between the mid-shot and close up which means it can show facial expression as well as body language. 

    Mid-shot – Framed from the waist up, not effective to show emotion but good for body language. 

    Wide / Long – Enables the audience to see the subject in its surroundings. Can show the subject’s size in comparison to the surroundings. Creates a clear idea of what’s going on.  

    Extreme Long Shot – Subject is still visible, but the focus is still on the surroundings. Doesn’t capture body language or facial expression. 

    Establishing Shot – Used to set the scene. Location shot found at the beginning of a sequence to introduce the settings. 

    2 shot – Shot of 2 people. Framed from waist up. 

    Over the Shoulder – Used to show 2 people in a conversation. Makes the conversation more believable.

    Other than the different shot sizes there is a way in which shots can be framed. Framing and shot sizes are linked closely so there isn’t much difference but with framing there is something called the ‘Rule of Thirds’ which is a grid system which helps you get the best shot possible. An image should be split into 9 identical size squares. Typically, objects aligned on the horizontal or vertical lines will create more tension, energy and interest within the composition than if the object was just centred in the middle of the shot.

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    White Balance is something which I have learnt about. I have learnt how to set the correct white balance on the Panasonic AGAC 160 camera but have also learnt the meaning of the term. White balance or colour balance as its sometimes known as basically means setting the camera to the correct balance of light which makes the white as natural as possible. The setting can be used to counteract light sources such as the orange/yellow colour of artificial light or cold light. Cameras will have an auto white balance setting but it’s better to use the manual setting. To set this you will need a white piece of paper, stand in the appropriate position with the camera zoomed into the paper with it focused. Then flick the ‘white bal’ switch to B or A then hold down the button which is at the front of the camera on the left of the IRIS, hold it for a few seconds until the screen tells you the white balance is set.

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    Something that can be linked to White Balance is the Kelvin Scale. On this scale, colour temperature is measured. It is measured in degrees of Kelvin (K) on a scale from 1,000 to 10,000.

    Higher the colour temperature means that the light source is closer to the blue end. 

    Lower the colour temperature means the light source is towards the red end.

    3200K is Tungsten light and 5600K is Direct daylight at noon, these are the 2 reference points to remember. Can be shortened to 3.2K and 5.6K

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  • Photograph Tips

    Utilize manual White Balance to enliven your own photos. It’s likely to allow the camera pick exactly the proper White Balance for a particular surroundings, however sometimes the camera will get it wrong and also the photo will look washed out. Employing a manual white balance also allows you to take pictures that are supersized with sepia tones, for instance.

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  • Sport Photo :THE 500 more focus on the GT power players, 84 L … by sguiney

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  • WHITE BALANCE SETTINGS - AFTER SHOOTING

    WB (White balance) key

    In camera raw (function of Adobe Bridge and Adobe Photoshop) you can tweak you images as you would from the camera. This is a really useful tool to make subtle changes to a number of images quickly. 

    In these screen shots I’m looking at the same image in three different WB settings. The exposure is set to ‘auto’. I do this with images shot at the same time in groups so that the exposure of the set of images taken at the same time will look all very similar in exposure - you will often not be able to tell the difference, and so other differences become more obvious to the eye, like colour temperature. 

    Here I’m experimenting with WB settings ‘daylight’ - appearing warm and quite orange. However ‘auto’ seems to contrast with the daylight setting, turning the image into a gradient of blue, white, and a softer coral orange. Finally when you see the setting ‘As shot’ it simply refers to how the image (WB) looked when the image was taken. 

    SIDE NOTE —————————————————————————–

    (Depending on what white balance setting was used on the camera at the time of taking the photo - the image will look like that. This is where the white balance settings in Camera Raw become useful. Say, accidentally, I had not looked at my white balance settings, after letting someone else use my camera. The white balance setting may be on ‘shade’, and if I’m taking an image in Florescent lighting conditions, the WB would be totally wrong, and probably a bit yellow. This is where WB becomes significant. WB can also be useful if you want to denote certain connotations about your subject - but I’ll discuss colour and colour temperature in another post. 

    SIDE NOTE —————————————————————————–

    In my images I want to keep as close to how the sky looked at the time of shooting - so I’m going to constantly be looking back at the ‘As shot’ setting. Then after trying the other settings I’ll decide which is the most accurate. Normally you can just click on ‘Auto’ and the correct WB setting will be put in place, and it’s a good way of seeing what ‘Auto’ is and then tweaking it to your liking. I do the same with exposure - see what ‘Auto’ does to my image, then make my own adjustments from there, sometimes auto doesn’t do a lot for your images, whereas with other times auto can completely save your image. I find it’s just a matter of trying out all the different settings, playing with them and learning what they do to your image, and deciding if you like it or if it works. 

    #4IMAG001W.1 The Photographic Eye #The Photographic Eye #white balance#settings#camera tec#set up#editing
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  • my first steps with Lightroom - different white balance - same motif

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  • extreme temperatures

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  • Realized from a youtube video that the character introductions in Stranger Things have clever white balancing to show who we should trust during the first season. Dr. Brenner get’s cold greens and blues, Joyce, Hopper, the kids and Jonathan all have warm oranges and yellows.

    Even more interesting is Eleven has neither. She gets plain old properly white-balanced light. Which is to say it’s white, neither orange warm lighting nor cold blue lighting. At first I thought it was just because, while every other character has a set motive, the good orange characters’ motive being to find Will, Brenner’s being selfish and potentially catastrophic, Eleven doesn’t really have one. Her priority is survival, and she doesn’t have plan or goal, or anything. She just wants to escape and survive.

    But as I was writing this I realized it could also symbolize her upbringing, and how it was obviously extremely medical and clinical. There’s also probably tons of other things the white balancing of the scenes symbolizes but I’m not prepared to make an entire essay about it.

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