#wildlife center Tumblr posts

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    A (baby) seal being transported to shore so the wildlife (rescue) center can help him.

    This little one wasn’t ok. He swam around an offshore platform for a few days and after consulting with the wildlife center they captured him and brought him to shore for further assesing and treatment.

    After the boat “docked” he was immediately taken off by the wildlife center.

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  • I mean, I love my job? Like, really love it? But man oh man that 4:45 am start time is wearing me down.

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  • The wildlife center that I volunteer at, while being run by a vet and performing most of it’s own medical procedures, has the jankiest human first-aid kit I’ve ever seen.

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    Ah yes, the ever necessary rusty safety pin, a staple of every first aid kit.

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    A single, dirty popsicle stick. I don’t know what we’d do without it.

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    And who can forget the literal garbage that any self-respecting vet keeps handy.

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    I think these could give even a piece of paper an infection.

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    This may have been sterile when it was put into the kit in 1964, but I don’t think it is anymore.

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    #first aid#wildlife center #i was hesitant to even use one of the bandaids
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  • #my job #adventures with baby animals #wildlife center
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    Mr. Hooty is an adult male Barred Owl. He suffered from a head injury and a broken wing. He is making a speedy recovery and plans to be released within the next few weeks.

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    Frig is a beautiful Barn owl. We have had her for about 6 months. She loves to hang out on the glove and eat mice.

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  • The pair of herons in flight, I am so excited about this set ;A;

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  • Happy Squirrel Appreciation Day!

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  • So I used to volunteer at a local wildlife center in the summer, as a “Junior Naturalist” which meant I talked to people about the animals that were there. My fave part of this was being able to handle the snakes and let people pet them. Me, loving snakes, would always try to get the little kids to touch them and see how cool and pretty they are. 

    But one day this kid walks in to the visitors’ center—where there are rats, birds, and the snakes are in one area—and he’s dressed as Indiana Jones, complete with a little whip. I, at first not noticing the costume, asked if he wanted to touch the snake I was holding and held it out toward him. He shies away and his dad just goes “Indiana Jones doesn’t like snakes” and I was like oh wow 

    like, kid, if your fears fit your cosplay, like whoah, if anyone has an excuse not to try and pet a benign snake, it’s that kid right there

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  • I found a Friend with some kind of eye infection, so I provided a free taxi ride to a wildlife center. Hopefully it can have another chance, now.

    I believe it’s a Virginia Rail. Never seen one in person before, so it was kinda cool. I’ll post an update if the center calls with any.

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  • Today at the Wildlife Center I work at, we had a raven pass away. Long story short, it healed well after arrival, graduated from indoor clinic to outdoor enclosure, but a few days ago its health started declining out of no where so it was brought back into the indoor clinic, and passed away this afternoon.

    Our Education Director is Native American and is always telling us what each animals means in her culture, and not only its impact on the environment, but how and what we can learn from each one, etc.

    Once or twice a year she’ll hold a ceremony for an animal who has passed in our care. I’ve never attended one, but today we decided to have one since our interns leave in a couple weeks, and the raven is an important part in Native culture. It’s also pretty cool because there’s a lot of tribal land in Washington (my other job is technically on one of the reservations) and I find Native culture really interesting since it deals a lot with nature. Not many people are given the chance to participate in something like that.

    So she said her words and started her rituals. Burning of sage, placed dry tobacco near the head, both sides of the raven, on it’s heart, and reproductive area. The ritual continued with the sage, feather, and all four directions; allowing it’s spirit to go in peace. She then wrapped it in a red blanket and tied with red string (forgot the significance of that) where it’s “vessel” was then taken to the freezer (not buried - we have regulations to uphold). We all got the talk that death was a part of life, and in nature the raven would’ve been food (life) or put back into the earth where it would aid the growing of plants, who then give off oxygen for everything else. Everything connected. 

    Life and death is something we probably take for granted working at a Rehab Center, since we’re in contact with both every day. This was a really cool moment to take a step back and re-evaluate what our role is at the Center and in life. We all got to feel a bit proud that what we’re doing is important. She then said she wouldn’t mind using the sage on any intern, volunteer, or staff member that wanted it. She could focus on the head if anything was troubling the mind, the heart is something was weighing you down on the inside, or the feet if there was something in the past you wanted to move on from. She said it didn’t matter who our higher power was, but that whoever it was would help. Whether the person being cleansed believed it or not - it was a really cool experience.

    #Native American Culture #Life and Death #Native Culture#Wildlife Center #Circle of Life #personal
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  • Nursery: More fun in the Philippines


    Crocodile farm, Puerto Princessa, Palawan

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  • I officially have two jobs.
    Volunteer at an amazing wildlife center.
    Get to see my best friend at Sunset Music Fest tomorrow.
    And going to the beach right now.
    Could things get any better!?!?

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  • I have a question for all you animal science  people. 

    I am in my first year at my current campus location. even though it is my second year in school, I have only been at the main campus and declared for one semester ( not including the current one im in). 

    So, I havent really had a big chance to make any major connections with professors in my department. 

    I have had one volunteer experience with a vet clinic about 2 hours north, but its a small clinic thats very clique-y and Im not sure how well received a request would be with them. 

    I need 2 letters of recommendation to be able to be a credited intern at the wildlife center instead of just a volunteer. 

    how do you guys get letters? Im not sure who to go to on this. 

    do you think it would be a better idea to just volunteer with the center this summer, and get connections made through them then intern under a different department of the center? (Ill be volunteering with the pre-release center. so I could intern with the hospital or the education center) or even volunteer and make connections then apply for internship at the zoo because they have a lot of cross over as far as people who work with the center and work for the zoo there. my advisor seems to think I should jump into interning right away, but I just dont have the connections to be able to land that right now

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  • Today at the wildlife center I volunteer at, I learned how to euthanize birds. We had a Varied Thrush come in who was attacked by a cat. It had a fractured wing, bruising, delayed responses, little to no movement, and was kept in a car overnight so it was cold (and wet).

    The volunteer lead thought I should know how to do it since i’ve been there almost 10 months and once spring hits we’ll get lots of patients. Anyways, we did we we had to do, I learned how to do the paperwork, and that was that. She said she’d like if I came in twice a week instead of once a week, and she could teach me more things. All this would give me more authority with the newer seasonal volunteers, and i’d have access to working with some of the more dangerous animals like coyotes and bobcats, and if I stuck with it a couple more years I could possibly be asked if I wanted a paid employment.

    Volunteering an extra day will mean I’ll have 1 day weekends probably since I already have a job. But meh, who needs free time. Hopefully down the line and by the grace of God I meet the right people and can impress my way into a career with the Department of Fish and Wildlife (I suppose I could settle with the Washington Forestry Protection Association) without a degree. See kids, dropping out of college can work in your favor if you do it the right way! I’ll probably end up going back to college anyways because a degree would be nice… but also ugh, college, y'know?

    #wildlife center#WDFW#WFPA#personal #as long as I have a career protecting the animals and trees i'll be happy #don't want to waste money at college tho #i'd rather spend that money on exploring the world and making myself cultured okay
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