#wwii Tumblr posts

  • carbone14
    26.10.2021 - 8 minutes ago

    La ville de Bourguébus, à 8 kilomètres au sud-est de Caen sur la route de Falaise, libérée par les britanniques, un char de dépannage (tank recovery) remorque un Sherman endommagé à travers la ville en ruine – 9 août 1944

    Photo : Sergent Wilkes - No. 5 Army Film and Photo Section, Army Film and Photographic Unit

    ©Imperial War Museums - B 8910

    #WWII #Bataille de Normandie #Bataille de Caen #Opération Goodwood #Char de dépannage #Tank recovery#M4 Sherman#Bourguébus#Calvados#France#09/08/1944#1944
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  • nocternalrandomness
    26.10.2021 - 33 minutes ago

    A low fast pass from Miss Velma

    #P-51D#Warbird#Mustang #343rd fighter squadron #WWII fighter
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  • dailyhistoryposts
    26.10.2021 - 1 hour ago

    Yekaterina Mikhailova-Demina

    Ekaterina Illarionovna Mikhailova-Demina, in Russian Екатерина Илларионовна Михайлова-Дёмина (1925-2019) was a Russian military doctor and recon officer.

    She was born in Leningrad and grew up in an orphanage, volunteering for military service and working in a military hospital at age 15. When her hospital was evacuated as the Germans advanced through Russia, she stayed behind to work as a field medic for the Red Army.

    Mikhailova-Demina volunteered for front-line service in the 369th Independent Naval Infantry Battalion. She treated and evacuated wounded and scouted enemy territory. She participated in a commando-style operation to assault a Nazi bunker and retake the city of Bilhorod-Dnistrovskyi. In her military career, Mikhailova-Demina was seriously wounded three times and personally saved the lives of hundreds of men.

    She was awarded the Florence Nightingale Medal for her work during WWII and, in 1950, became a doctor. She was nominated three times for the Hero of the Soviet Union, the highest distinction in the country, but was turned down due to sexism. Mikhailova-Demina received it belatedly in 1990.

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  • lightdancer1
    26.10.2021 - 1 hour ago

    That said it's worth noting whenever I bring up the Mongolian and Imperial Japanese aspects:

    In real life Imperial Japan killed tens of millions of people in Asia. In one noticeable case they retaliated to Chinese civilians enabling six US pilots to escape a manhunt by having a quarter million people killed in a rampage (no I am not exaggerating this a bit).

    The Mongol Empire killed enough of humanity to produce a literal climate effect.

    Downplaying the elements of what the IRL Asian societies that go into these inspirations do and playing up more or less European aspects is also meant, in-universe, to reflect a US reader base that given the demographics of the Internet (and the USA) is likelier to be Euro-American than Asian-American.

    If Genocidal Side X is more like the readers than the other side, that's a completely unsubtle message on what the whole 'liberating the shit out of a place' thing actually looks like and is meant to be a not so subtle message that the fictional imperialists take a wee bit of elements from the in real life versions (if ironically enough usually downplayed).

    #atla aus#imperial japan #the mongol empire #wwii japan killed between 3 and 14 million people #Genghis Khan and sons really did create global cooling
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  • through-a-historic-lens
    26.10.2021 - 1 hour ago

    U.S. Army Corporal Larry Matinsk puts cigarettes into the extended hands of newly liberated prisoners behind a stockade in the Allach Concentration Camp. April 30, 1945

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  • sgmfanzine
    26.10.2021 - 1 hour ago
    #juegos#juegos guerra #segunda guerra mundial #ww2#wwii
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  • through-a-historic-lens
    26.10.2021 - 3 hours ago

    Two U.S. soldiers look over the ruins surrounding the Cologne Cathedral. 1945

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  • liusaidh-writing
    26.10.2021 - 5 hours ago

    Photographs: The Beginning

    Chapter 14: Three Weeks

    ---

    Hi readers! I want to thank you for your patience with me. Have been struggling to write lately, but finally was able to sit down and get this out of me. I am dipping my toes back into the water slowly, with this wee chapter I hope you enjoy. I really want them back together, so this’ll be the last chapter where Claire is in nursing school. It’s time for a wedding, don’t you think? 

    Thanks for all the likes/comments/reblogs/kudos/etc. They mean the world to me!

    ---

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  • theworldatwar
    26.10.2021 - 6 hours ago

    German troops on the move during the fight for Kharkov in 1942.

    The other two soldiers at the front are thought to be Soviet deserters or POW’s that were forced to aid them in their advance.

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  • taraross-1787
    26.10.2021 - 6 hours ago

    This Day in History: WWII Pilot Gertrude Tompkins

    On this day in 1944, an elite American female pilot climbs into a P-51D Mustang fighter. Gertrude Tompkins Silver was tasked with ferrying the plane to the east coast. She was never seen again.

    Gertrude is the only member of the Women Airforce Service Pilots (WASPs) still missing in action after World War II.

    Her path to the WASPs was unusual. Gertrude spent much of her childhood struggling with a stutter. She hated school because she was relentlessly teased, so she did just enough to scrape by. Books were her main escape.

    Gertrude’s life would change forever in late 1940 or early 1941, when she was in her late 20s. By then, she was working for her father’s company. One night at a dance, she met Mike Kolendorski. He was an American pilot volunteering to help England against Germany.

    The young couple had a necessarily short courtship because of the war, but they appear to have been in love. Unfortunately, Mike was killed in action in May 1941. Gertrude was distraught, but distracted herself with flying lessons.

    When America began recruiting female pilots for the war effort, she volunteered.

    The story continues at the link in the comments. 

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  • retrowar
    26.10.2021 - 7 hours ago

    Fw 190

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  • theworldatwar
    26.10.2021 - 7 hours ago

    The Motorised Submersible Canoe (MSC) was developed by Major Hugh Reeves RE in 1942 as part of a directive from the British SOE.

    It was designed to shallow dive, regularly returning to the surface so the operator could get his bearings and quietly make his way towards enemy shipping. The operator would then leave the craft, swim to the target and planet his limpet mines before going back to the craft and making his escape.

    Not much is known of its service but it was part of an operation in 1944 to disrupt Japanese shipping lanes in Singapore called “Operation Rimau” - a mission undertaken by “Z Force” - a unit made up of British, Australian and New Zealand commandos.

    It’s nickname was “Sleeping Beauty”, earned when a passing officer found Major Reeves taking a nap in one.

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  • through-a-historic-lens
    26.10.2021 - 9 hours ago

    As US troops advanced, and the sound of gunfire drew closer, prisoners at the Dachau concentration camp started cheering and waving the flags of the allied nations. The flags were secretly constructed in anticipation of the liberators’ arrival. April 30, 1945

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  • charmlessgraham-blog
    26.10.2021 - 11 hours ago

    Nurse (2021)

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  • lostforeverhistory
    26.10.2021 - 13 hours ago

    Wiesław Chrzanowski (20 Dec 1923 29 Apr 2012), of the Polish Home Army's "Anna" Company of the "Gustaw" Battalion, photographed on the balcony of a townhouse in September 1944

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  • theworldatwar
    26.10.2021 - 14 hours ago

    German soldiers go house to house looking for pockets of resistance - Sevastopol 1942

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  • vox-anglosphere
    26.10.2021 - 14 hours ago

    Staggering as it sounds, every pane of York Minster's priceless stained glass was removed, labelled, and buried during WWII. The Rose Window alone contained 7000 pieces.

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