#your-local-lycanthrope Tumblr posts

  • witchykincare
    21.06.2021 - 1 mont ago
    #not a request #legitimately cried a little bit bc this was so nice 😭 #your local lycanthrope #feedback
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  • sumzysworld
    21.07.2021 - 5 days ago
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  • awilddreamerwrites
    19.07.2021 - 1 week ago

    ⠀ ⠀𝐃𝐨𝐠 𝐓𝐞𝐞𝐭𝐡 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝑩𝒍𝒐𝒐𝒅𝒚 𝑺𝒕𝒂𝒓𝒔

    ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀𝐓𝐚𝐠 𝐋𝐢𝐬𝐭 | 𝐏𝐥𝐚𝐲𝐥𝐢𝐬𝐭

    𝖳𝗁𝖾𝗆𝖾 — Tell Me - Ørka | Windrush - Auram, Wrenn | Falling Too - Veda | Atone - Flora Cash
    𝖶𝖺𝗋𝗇𝗂𝗇𝗀 — NSFW Content MINORS DO NOT INTERACT, descriptions of violence and gore, kidnapping, protective Bakugou, a/b/o themes, will add more as needed.
    𝖠𝗅𝗍𝖾𝗋𝗇𝖺𝗍𝖾 𝖴𝗇𝗂𝗏𝖾𝗋𝗌𝖾 — Soulmate AU & Lycanthrope (Werewolf) AU; lore is loosely based off of Japanese mythology with my own creative twists. They have two forms in this story: Wolf & Lycan (bipedal). Quirks still exist! Soulmates are usually discovered through some kind of matching mark in the same place on the body. Like a birthmark.
    𝖲𝗎𝗆𝗆𝖺𝗋𝗒 — When they were children, Reader was a victim to Bakugou's insesent bullying because of how useless or stupid her quirk was. Izuku was her only real friend and she couldn't ever understand why he kept chasing after the boy who clearly hated him. Years passed and Reader was separated from the two when they began highschool, the boys getting into UA and Reader going to a "normal" institution. Now she's in college, working to become a veterinarian and working at a local animal shelter because her quirk is useful for something. She watches the boys through a TV screen fighting villains and saving the day every morning and night, wishing things could have been different. One night, while getting ready to close up the shelter a frantic person with red spiked hair and starp teeth comes banging on the door with a rather large animal in his arms that's bleeding profusely. Everything spirals from there and things will never be the same.
    𝖰𝗎𝗂𝗋𝗄 — Zoolingualism: The ability to communicate with animals. This is a verbal quirk, you speak in whatever language is your native tongue and surprise, animals can actually understand people. Only downside is anyone on the outside just sees you talking to the animal and the animal making sounds in return. You might get weird looks, but imagine the secrets you can learn! This also doesn't work on bugs like Koda's Anivoice does.
    𝖣𝗂𝗌𝖼𝗅𝖺𝗂𝗆𝖾𝗋 — The two image links lead to Pinterest, I know, bad Chelsey. I am in NO WAY claiming that art as mine, I'm simply trying to show you what I mean when I say wolf and lycan because I'm shit at explaining things. Down below is Bakugou's wolf form.
    Table of Contents.
    Chapter I. | Chapter II. | Chapter III.
    Chapter IV. | Chapter V. | Chapter VI.
    Chapter VII. | Chapter VIII. | Chapter IX.
    Chapter X. | Chapter XI. | Chapter XII.
    #{🐺} — Dog Teeth and Bloody Stars #{🌾} — a dreamer writes #{🌻} — dreamer's stuff #.katsuki baku-hoe #katsuki bakugou#bakugou katsuki#katsuki #katsuki bakugou x female reader #katsuki bakugou x you #katsuki bakugou x y/n #bnha x reader #mha x reader #anime x reader
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  • spartanguard
    15.07.2021 - 1 week ago

    most wanted (2/?) [CSSNS 2021]

    Summary: Killian Jones has been tracking Emma Swan, notorious cat burglar, across the realm as she’s wanted for murder. The sooner he finds her, the faster he gets back to his daughter. But meeting an enchanting lass in a small village—along with Miss Swan’s feline familiar (perhaps too familiar)—definitely affects his plans; this case might not be as open-and-shut as he’d like.
    A/N: Thanks to everyone who commented on the first chapter of this new adventure for @cssns! Here’s the next one; I plan on posting chapters whenever the following one is completed. I'm also working on this story for Camp Nanowrimo July 2021, so cross your fingers I don't run out of steam. Thank you to the ladies in the Nano server (especially @optomisticgirl, @shireness-says, @ohmightydevviepuu, @profdanglaisstuff, @thisonesatellite, and @winterbythesea) for your encouragement, and B for always being an amazing beta! Enjoy!
    rated T | 5.7k words | part 1 | AO3

    There was an unusual buzz in the tavern when Killian went down for breakfast the next morning. Not only was the breakfast crowd larger than usual, but the hum of fervid conversation was almost visceral, vibrating through the floorboards and even the counter, once he’d taken his seat at the end of it. 

    Ruby was quick to arrive with a fresh mug and a steaming pot of coffee. “Lass, what’s got everyone in a tizzy?” 

    She quirked one of her perfectly shaped eyebrows, then, while expertly filling his cup, smoothly reached down the counter to pick up a piece of parchment and set it in front of him. (He knew werewolves were coordinated but it wasn’t until then he realized just how; no wonder the Lycanthropic Ballet was so popular in the capital of Misthaven.) 

    It was an advert, its style not unlike the wanted poster still tucked in his jacket pocket—and not all that different in its content, given that they apparently featured the same subject. In bold font, across the top, it declared:

    THE HAND OF MISS MARGARET BLANCHARD CAN BE YOURS

    Below was a drawing of a light-colored cat, not unlike the one he’d seen in the alley the previous night. And as he read on, he grew angry with himself.

    KEEP AN EYE OUT FOR A TAWNY CAT WITH A KEY ‘ROUND ITS NECK

    THE FIRST TO GET THE KEY WILL BE ABLE TO UNLOCK MISS BLANCHARD’S DOOR—AND HER HEART

    GOOD LUCK TO ALL! MAY THE BEST MAN WIN

    Bloody hell—the best way to track down Emma Swan had been right there. Now that he thought about it, there’d been occasional mention of a feline presence in the vicinity of her various heists, but it had never been described in detail.

    All around him, he was hearing various methods of capture discussed—cages and traps of all manner, and at least one man was debating a visit to the local witch to see what she might be able to offer. While he had considered himself above all the foolish pining going on in this town, if he was to complete this assignment, he was going to have to play this game. But how?

    “Well, are you gonna do it?” He jumped at the voice—but then smiled at the sight of Anna in front of him, sliding a plate of food across the counter. 

    “Pardon?”

    She nodded at the flyer. “Do you also want to win the hand of Miss Blanchard?”

    He made a show of scoffing. “No; I’m not in the market for a wife—not this way, at least,” he quickly added. As true as the statement generally was, he didn’t want to push away Anna’s attentions. (And the only thing he wanted to do with Emma Swan’s hands was put them in cuffs.)

    “No? You might be the only guy here, then.”

    “Call me old-fashioned, but I prefer to woo a woman with my charm and good looks—not cat-napping.”

    “And how’s that worked out for you?”

    “You tell me,” he tossed back, attempting to wink again (he’d never be any good at it if he didn’t practice, after all).

    She rolled her eyes, but he caught the pink rising on her cheeks. “You’re not worried you’re passing up an opportunity at True Love?”

    He snorted; it would be a cruel trick of the universe if a woman like Emma Swan ended up being his true love. “I have a feeling if I were to ever find that, it wouldn’t be through a game of cat-and-mouse—or is this mouse-and-cat?”

    She laughed. “Maybe that’s a reason why you should be taking part.”

    He had to smile sadly at that. “Ah, no; I’m afraid I already had that chance.” His mind wandered back to Milah, as it so often did. “So I’ll let the other young men take their shot at Miss Blanchard; perhaps it’ll provide some extra entertainment.”

    Her smile fell at that, and she was about to say something when Granny shouted from the kitchen. “Well, duty calls,” she said. “Hope the boys put on a good show for you.”

    “You, too, love,” he smiled back. His hand felt the warmth of hers long after she went back in the kitchen.

    That was also when he realized—his was the only dish she delivered all morning. Well, now it was his turn to blush.

    He dug into the meal and pretended to focus on the new menu Anna had printed up last night, while continuing to listen to the townsfolk debate the best method of cat-catching. He didn’t like it, but he needed to take notes if he was going to have any success in nabbing this mark.

    ◇─◇──◇────◇────◇────◇────◇────◇─────◇──◇─◇

    After breakfast, he finally made his way to the post office, letter in tow. It was just a small room tacked onto the town hall—not so much an afterthought as a late addition, once the postal network had been established and finally reached this little corner of the realm. (He’d already heard talk of a network that could transmit messages via wires in the sky in the larger cities; it would likely be quite some time before such an innovation came here, and if it ever did, they’d probably just add another room to the municipal building.)

    The room was small but clean, big enough for a few people to queue up to the simple counter and conduct their business without getting involved in anyone else’s. (Something perhaps hard to come by in a small town like this.)

    The man behind the counter was hardly taller than it, it seemed, and bore a resemblance to the grumpy man Killian had taken breakfast with the last two days. Judging by the jaw-cracking yawn he gave as Killian approached, he wondered if he shouldn’t have brought a mug of coffee in addition to his mail. But the postmaster didn’t seem too put out by his presence, and if he wasn’t mistaken, charged a few coins less than he should have for a letter of this weight. 

    He was settling the balance when Killian took note of the memorandums on the wall behind him—specifically, the wanted posters, including a very familiar one. 

    “Have you seen any of them?” he asked casually, nodding toward the notices.

    The man yawned again. “In this sleepy little town? Please. We’d be so lucky to have that kind of excitement here. I only put ‘em up as a formality.” He gestured with his thumb towards the main building. “The cell in there has only seen Leroy when he’s had a few too many to get home.”

    Killian winced; he knew what that was like. In a previous life, he’d been held in his fair share of brigs for similar offenses. But that was long in the past.

    “Thanks,” he said, for both the information and seeing the letter off, and then took his leave of the office.

    The afternoon was spent in the park again, with a different battered paperback—a high-seas thriller this time. He wasn’t sure he’d see much during the day, of either the cat or anyone trying to catch it, but he noticed one of the young men from the tavern taking a seat at a bench across the park during the second chapter (when the governor’s daughter gets kidnapped by the pirates, and the blacksmith who pines for her sets off to save her). 

    Several others trickled in as the day wore on, but with no sign of the cat, it seemed to be for nought. Still, he kept a wary eye on his surroundings even as he continued to tear through the tale of a cursed pirate ship and the bumbling fool trying to get it back.

    He was nearing the end of the story—where the governor’s daughter and the blacksmith finally admit their mutual feelings—when a small, light-colored creature crept into his peripheral vision. 

    It was the cat—and there was clearly a ribbon tied around its neck, with a long, metallic pendant. It was slinking through the taller grasses in the middle of the clearing, and almost seemed to be swaying its hips seductively—which was absurd, of course, because it was a cat, but that was the impression he was left with.

    He made no move, nor even acknowledged that the feline had caught his attention. He simply waited for the others to take note, which took much longer than he thought it would. The cat was halfway across the park before any of the other men realized it was there. 

    The most brave one, apparently, stood up slowly, his eyes locked on the cat. If the cat realized it was being followed, it gave no indication; its tail continued to twitch casually above the grass.

    Slowly, the lad stalked the small beast, taking careful steps closer to his quarry. But it was painfully obvious that the boy had never had to catch so much as his own dinner, because he suddenly jerked forward and jumped toward the cat, a flying leap that Killian assumed was supposed to end with the man’s hands around the cat’s middle.

    As soon as he made his rash movement, though, the cat became aware it was being hunted—and took off like a bolt of lightning. The lad was nowhere close to catching it, and by the time he’d brushed the dust off his slacks, the cat was safe and sound on a branch in the closest tree, hissing at one of his comrade’s feeble attempts to grab it in his overcoat. Killian hoped there was a good seamstress in town, because that jacket was very close to being ripped to shreds—the cat’s claws were sharp and it was not afraid to use them.

    In the span of a few more minutes, the cat was halfway up the tree, and the gaggle of young men were in various states of disheveled—dirty, scratched, and one was surely going to be nursing a sore rear end from falling off a low branch in a vain attempt to climb after the kitty.

    Killian closed the cover on his book, having reached the end (where the governor’s daughter and blacksmith both turn rogue—another favorite moment of Alice’s) and headed back to the inn to start another letter to his daughter, chuckling to himself at the scene he’d just watched play out.

    Two things were clear: one, that he didn’t have much competition in this contest; but two, that he’d need to get creative if he wanted to get close to the cat.

    He didn’t get to the rank of Captain without thinking outside the box, though, and he was no stranger to a challenge—in fact, he lived on them. He was certain he’d solve this one, too.

    After a brief respite in his rented room, where he summarized the slapstick scene he’d just witnessed for Alice’s future amusement, he heeded the slight grumble in his stomach and headed into the diner for his evening meal—and perhaps to relay to Anna the humorous events of the afternoon.

    Alas, the only dark-haired woman behind the counter was Ruby, who confirmed to him that Anna never worked the evening shift. “She’s not good in crowds,” she confided in him, “and ironically isn’t all that great with strangers. Consider yourself lucky she’s taken a shine to you,” she added.

    “Oh, I do,” he confessed.

    “Honestly, you’re the first guy she’s crushed on that I approve of...so far.”

    His heart skipped a beat at the mention of a crush, juvenile as it was. And while he wondered what kind of men had caught her eye in the past, he wasn’t about to linger on it; gods knew his own past was littered with questionable romances. Perhaps he should rein it in a bit. “You hardly know me, lass.”

    She leaned in and sniffed him. (Somehow not the first time that had happened in his life.) “True, but—you smell good,” she assessed with a wink. “If I didn’t have a girlfriend two towns over, I’d probably be all over you, too.”

    She was quickly called to the other end of the bar, but eventually came back to deliver a dish of stew and fresh bread. The tavern was filling up with the evening crowd, so Killian made quick work of his meal—another Navy habit that had stuck around—and headed back up to his room.

    He was skimming over some paperwork when he realized it had been a while since he updated his boss on the situation, so he returned to the writing desk to pen another missive. Earlier, he’d had the fanciful notion that if he were an author of more than just letters, this room—this desk, in particular—would be a lovely spot to work, with its position just below the open window, looking straight into a large tree behind the building. The poetic side of him noted how one could watch the turn of the seasons from this seat; the practical side was trying to figure out how hard it would be to leap to the nearest branch in case a hasty exit was needed.

    He was studying the closest one, but when the bow began to bend under the weight of some small nocturnal beast, he decided it likely wouldn’t hold him. He began to scan for a thicker limb, but then the small creature came into clearer view—the cat. 

    It couldn’t be as easy as the kitty jumping straight into his window, could it? Perhaps not; it seemed to find a good place to rest at the forking of two branches and precariously settled down, though he couldn’t say it looked comfortable.

    While it may not have been the most original of ideas, he’d be a fool to not try something with the cat so close. So he pursed his lips and made a sort of kissing noise to try to get its attention.

    And it worked! He saw the cat’s ears twitch and then it looked straight at him. Even more incredibly, it resumed its journey down the branch, which conveniently ended just a few inches away from the wide ledge of Killian’s window.

    Carefully, making sure to not disturb his inkwell, he stood and placed one knee on the desk’s surface to prop him up, then pulled the other up. He was glad he hadn’t taken his prosthetic hand off yet, and set that on the ledge to keep his balance as he leaned out ever so slightly.

    The cat was almost within reach, but he’d be risking a nasty fall if it went awry. So he tried the time-honored approach of merely holding his hand out to let it sniff him and approach on its own.

    However, almost as soon as he did, the cat startled and jumped—first onto the adjacent room’s window ledge, then up onto the gutter, over the roof, and into the night.

    Blast! He couldn’t prevent the sting of defeat, but at least it was only metaphorical and not physical. If the small beast was skittish, perhaps there was yet a way to win its trust.

    He thought back to the mousers who lived on the Navy ships, and the one who would occasionally visit his home and had befriended Alice. Specifically, recalling what typically brought them near—and what he likely had access to here.

    A plan quickly formed in his mind—perhaps not terribly original, but he had to hope it would fare better than those thought up by the immature pricks in town. It would require a bit more patience, most likely, but that was something he had in spades.

    He withdrew from the window, hopped off the desk, and quickly finished his letter, assuring his boss that he would indeed catch the elusive Emma Swan.

    And when he tucked himself into bed, staring at the image of Alice, he had hope he’d be getting back to her sooner than expected.

    ◇─◇──◇────◇────◇────◇────◇────◇─────◇──◇─◇

    Anna wasn’t in the diner the following morning; Ruby said something about a day off. While disappointed, it was just as well—everything in the last 12 hours or so was reminding him that he wouldn’t be here long-term, and Killian’s gentlemanly instincts would prefer an extended courtship, not the minimal number of days he’d be in town. (It certainly wouldn’t stop him from flirting with her, of course, especially if she was doing the same.)

    He ate quickly, managed to talk to Granny for a couple minutes to get some information, then stopped in the post office to send off the letter to his boss before heading into the town’s surprisingly large general store. It was usually hit or miss in a town this size—either they had lots of little shops to cater to each specific need the population might have, or everything ended up in the same place. The fact it was the latter made his venture that much simpler, and it didn’t take long until he’d located the aisle with fishing rods and tackle. 

    They had an impressive selection—he shouldn’t have been all that shocked, given the fact it was a seaside town, but he was slightly overwhelmed at the decisions in front of him. He didn’t need anything complicated, especially since he doubted Roger would be very amenable to toting anything obnoxious around once they left town, so he found a decent but inexpensive rod, and a lure similar to the style they used on occasion in the Navy.

    For a long moment, he lingered over a short, sturdy pole—the kind that would quite suit a child of 10 or so. He’d once fashioned a small rod and line for Alice when she was younger and they’d drop a line off the small dock near their home, but she was quickly outgrowing it and ready for more challenging quarry than what lived in the shallows. He heavily considered sending it to her, with the promise of future excursions. But maybe, once this job was done, he’d actually bring her here for a real vacation. Granny’s inn was becoming increasingly cozy...not to mention his growing attachment to the staff. (That would solve his courting problem, for certain.)

    He shook his head; there’d be time for fantasies later. For now, he took his purchases up to the counter and settled the sale with the clerk, who was also able to provide him some bait, as well as a tin pail. Then he crossed the dusty street and perused the boardwalk until he found a suitable, quiet dock where he might pass the time.

    He was still there around the lunch hour, and debating making a meal from one of the several trout flopping around in his bucket, when footsteps approached from behind.

    “First reading, now fishing; what kind of old man are you?” Anna’s voice teased.

    He turned around, ready to protest (or lament that she’d noticed his few graying strands, which he thought were hidden), but the quip died on his lips when he noticed that she had a book in her own hand. “Not so different from you, I suspect,” he finally said. “I suppose you’ve left the knitting needles at home?”

    “Please,” she retorted. “I crochet.”

    “My apologies,” he said, chuckling, as she took a seat next to him on the dock, letting her booted feet dangle over the water.

    “Those are some good-looking fish,” she commented, glancing at his pail. “Probably good eating. Are you going to break Granny’s heart and make your own food tonight?”

    “I wouldn’t dare,” he said gravely. “They’re for her, actually.” Well, most of them; he really only needed one or two for his purposes, but Granny promised a fish fry if he brought back enough. He hadn’t had anything like that since one of the better galley cooks on his last ship; while he was a rather good chef in his own right, that was one dish he hadn’t mastered.

    “Mmm, that’ll be good,” she hummed. “Fresh fish is the best.”

    “Indeed; it’s a blessing of living seaside that you have it so often.”

    “You don’t?” she asked. “Live by the water, I mean.”

    “Oh, no, I do; we just have a different array of fish in our waters. It’s been years since I lived anywhere with easy access to trout. One of those situations where you don’t realize what you have until it's gone, I suppose.”

    “That’s a pretty mild one,” she said, laughing lightly. “If that’s all you’re missing in your life, I envy you.”

    His coquettish side almost made him blurt out something about a lack of female company, but he could already envision the way she’d roll her eyes at such a line (not to mention the way Belle might slap him upside the head back home). “Let’s just say I’m at a point in my life where I’m thankful to have such slight complaints; that wasn’t always the case,” he said instead. “Life...hasn’t led me where I expected it to.” He hadn’t planned on making such a personal confession, but it seemed like she needed to commiserate.

    “It tends to do that,” she agreed, albeit morosely. “Wish it wouldn’t sometimes. I’d kill for a bit of free will.”

    “An undervalued commodity, that,” he concurred, and felt a tug on his line; he used his legs to hold the end of the rod and began to reel it in. “I’ve definitely seen the good and the bad that can come from it, but I wouldn’t trade any of the good for all of the bad.” He pulled another trout out of the water; the biggest one yet. “Though I’m sure this fellow wishes he hadn’t chosen to nibble on that worm.”

    “I know how he feels,” she sighed, and slumped her shoulders while kicking her feet listlessly.

    “Hey,” he said firmly, letting the fish wriggle on the line as he placed his right hand over her left. “I don’t know what’s happened in your past, but all that matters is moving forward. I’ve…” he stammered a bit, unsure he wanted to divulge further, but continued on. “I’ve been in some dark places before; less than honorable ones. But once I found something to fight for, it gave me the motivation to move forward, and keep at it, until I was somewhere better—somewhere happier. By no means perfect, but a far cry from where I ever thought I’d be in some of my darker moments. Once you find that, I’ve no doubt you’ll get there, love.”

    Some might say that fatherhood had made him a sap, but Anna smiled at his words, though not fully; still, if she’d gleaned any bit of hope from them, he considered it worth it. “I’m not sure it’ll be as easy as you make it sound, not for me.”

    “I apologize if I gave that impression; it was actually the hardest thing I’ve done.”

    She tilted her head and furrowed her brow. “Just how bad?”

    He nervously scratched behind his ear—both because he wasn’t sure how much of the real story he should divulge, considering the half-truths he’d been skating by on since he met her, but also knowing that even partial truth wasn’t pretty. “My older brother...well, to make a long story short, he practically raised me; we were inseparable; and then he died. Was killed, rather. And I...did not take it well, in the slightest. My liver no doubt has irreparable damage. I thought I was going to burn it all down and take vengeance on the institutions that I thought were responsible for his death...I didn’t manage much more than petty larceny before some sense was talked into me, but it was quite some time before I let go of some of my more self-destructive habits.”

    (It was a whitewashed version of the truth—because there were still some corners of the realm that recalled the story of the young lieutenant-turned-captain who tried to take on the entire Royal Navy single-handedly, though all he’d really managed to do was destroy a sail of significant value and liberate several ships of their rum stores. Until he met fellow veteran Nemo, who convinced him there were perhaps more above-board ways of righting wrongs; he was still employed by the man to this day. But it wasn’t until Alice’s unexpected appearance in his life that he truly turned things around.)

    She gave him a sad-half smile. “I’m proud of you, for coming out of that,” she told him. “But I think I may have already missed my chance.” 

    “It’s never too late, love,” he encouraged, squeezing her hand. She glanced down at their joined hands, then up at him, uncertainty, shame, and something like wonder staring back at him. It made his heart break that she felt like her situation was that dire, but she struck him as resourceful; she’d figure it out. (And no doubt in a better way than her cousin Emma Swan had done.)

    (Part of him still didn’t understand how the two women could be related; but perhaps bad luck was genetic. Their responses to it were surely different, though.)

    A splash on the surface of the water made them both jump, and Anna pulled her hand back; Killian realized the end of his fishing rod suddenly felt lighter, and sure enough, the fish had managed to squirm its way off the line, taking the hook with it but leaving the lure.

    “I guess that’s one way to tell me my stories aren’t much good,” he quipped.

    She snorted; it was the levity their rather intense moment prior needed. “Well, I thought it was fine. And thank you, for telling me all that. You’re a good man, Ian.”

    The fact she couldn’t use his real name suggested otherwise, but her confidence in him was a boost; few were, but the ones who did trust him were the most important to him.

    Before he could give a verbal response—the heat he felt in his ears was likely a nonverbal one—she drew her feet up and made to stand. “But I’ll leave you to your fishing now; I’m sure Granny has high expectations, and I don’t want to be the one to drive the fish away.” She glanced down at her book. “What you said about reading in the park made me decide to give it another go.”

    “You sound skeptical, especially with how warmly you recalled it.”

    She shrugged. “I’ve learned to value quiet and privacy a bit more as I’ve gotten older. But I guess we can mix it up for a day or so.”

    “Excellent choice, love,” he affirmed.

    “See you later,” she farewelled, and he watched her walk away before trying to attach another hook to his line. Given his altered dexterity, it would need his full attention, and he found himself constantly lacking that when she was around.

    But soon, her graceful form was out of sight, headed back to the town center, and it was just he and his thoughts again. Of course, she consumed a fair few of them—particularly, imagining how she’d get along with Alice, though that might have been the farthest fantasy of all the ones he’d managed to come up with—but all in all, he spent a pleasant afternoon passing through his daydreams while pulling fish from the sea.

    Dragging the overladen bucket back across the street was more difficult than he anticipated—apparently, he’d been a bit too good at catching fish, and while he was by no means out of shape, he hadn’t done that kind of brute manual labor since...well, since his discharge from the Navy. But his sleight of hand was still up to par—Granny didn’t notice when he slipped out one of the heavier fish from the stash when he handed it off to her. He just had to hope Ruby’s nose didn’t catch on once he got it back up to his room.

    (He may also have peeked out his window to the park beyond, and noticed Anna serenely reading on the bench and smiled—then bit back a chuckle at the lad trying to climb a tree with some medieval-looking contraption that he assumed to be a trap. To absolutely no surprise, the man lost his footing a few branches up, then the cage-like trap closed around his hand and he fell several feet to the ground. Actually, that made him wince; he’d definitely been in that position before. But he could also see Anna trying not to laugh at the antics.)

    The fish fry that evening was indeed divine—perhaps even better than that in his memory—and the chips Granny paired it with made for the best meal he’d had in months. Perhaps it wasn’t best to dream of decamping here permanently, lest it show on his waistline. (But that likely wouldn’t stop his hopes of an actual vacation and not a feigned one.)

    Back upstairs, with knife in hand and trout in the wash basin in front of him, he did make a rather depressing discovery: he hadn’t had to gut a fish this large since he lost his hand. In the years since he’d become an amputee, he’d had a number of such revelations—trying to button a shirt, lace his boots, change a diaper. None of those were quite so slippery as this, though. (Actually, that was a lie—Alice was incredibly squirmy as an infant...and, if he was being honest, still was, but she no longer needed his aide in bathing.) 

    He set the knife down and dug out his knapsack, pulling out his hook for the first time since he’d arrived. While he might have been able to shape the fingers of his prosthesis in such a way as it could hold the fish, it didn’t give the grip he needed—and he’d rather it didn’t reek of brine for gods-knew-how long. The hook, though—that was pretty good at holding things in place, whether they be food he was preparing, parchment as he wrote on it, or, one time, a bounty’s hand (the man certainly hadn’t evaded arrest after that).

    It was by no means a clean job, and it still slipped away from him, even with the way the hook was piercing the head, but he hoped the cat wouldn’t be too picky about the jagged edges on the resulting meat. Or the number of bones.

    He set the meat aside and washed his hand as best he could, then took a bit of the fish and set it on the ledge of his open window. Outside, it looked like the same gaggle of gents was in the park again, but there was no sign of the cat. The man with the trap from earlier had some friends with him this time and they seemed to have more success in placing the trap, but it was hard to tell what they were using as bait, if any. Amateurs.

    The three men began to squabble as they waited—about who would actually get to claim the key, it sounded like. Killian laughed at their immaturity and shook his head; ah, the fallacies of youth. (Not that he was particularly old; but there were times it felt like he’d lived a few centuries rather than a few decades.) 

    As his head moved, he caught a flash of white out the corner of his eye, and looked—there was the cat, perched on the edge of the roof of the inn. If he wasn’t mistaken, it too was watching the bickering boys with something akin to derision. He supposed it was fitting that the cat seemed to have some discernment when it was holding the key, literally, to Miss Swan’s fate—but would it be able to see through his intentions?

    He hoped not, and leaned his head out to repeat the beckoning, kiss-like noises he’d made the night before that had drawn it near. He wasn’t so bold as to approach it again, but maybe, just maybe, he’d be able to earn its trust.

    The cat’s ears perked at the sounds, and then it lifted its nose in the air and sniffed. He worried it might not be pungent enough tonight (though it might get that way, depending on how long this went), but then the cat looked his way and its eyes grew wide, and then it carefully crawled along the gutter in his direction.

    It went out of view as it got closer to his window, and he wondered if it might continue on, but then it dropped right onto the ledge, startling him to the point he again nearly knocked over his inkwell (thank goodness it was stoppered). The cat sniffed the meat, licked it cautiously, then began to nibble at it—at least, for the first few bites, but then it began to take larger chunks, and the small piece was quickly gone.

    It was sniffing and licking up any last crumbs when Killian decided to approach it, slowly extending his hand toward the window so as not to startle it. Once the tiny beast had realized it’d gotten all the remaining bits of fish, it glanced around, and then noticed his waiting fist. For a long moment, it stared at his hand, then glanced at him back inside.

    And then, carefully, it leaned in to give him a sniff. Logically, he knew it probably smelled like fish as well, but he counted its curiosity in him as progress—especially when it got close enough for its whiskers to tickle the back of his hand.

    Of course, that made him giggle reflexively, which then made it scurry away, hopping to another window ledge and back to the roof like it had the night before.

    But—he’d still gotten closer than any man yet, which surely boded well. 

    He closed the window, added to his letter to Alice, and then settled into bed for the night. He was glad this venture, unusual as it was, seemed to be going well; the only lament was that it meant less time in Anna’s company. 

    But he could deal with that—and those feelings—later.

    ◇─◇──◇────◇────◇────◇────◇────◇─────◇──◇─◇

    thanks for reading! tagging some (let me know if you do/don't want a tag!) @kat2609 @thesschesthair @xpumpkindumplingx @shipsxahoy  @mryddinwilt @cocohook38 @annytecture  @wingedlioness @word-bug  @distant-rose @wellhellotragic @welllpthisishappening @let-it-raines @pirateherokillian @its-imperator-furiosa @fergus80 @killianmesmalls @thejollyroger-writer @ineffablecolors @laschatzi @ive-always-been-a-pirate @nfbagelperson @stubblesandwich @phiralovesloki @athenascarlet @kmomof4 @ilovemesomekillianjones @whimsicallyenchantedrose @snowbellewells @idristardis @scientificapricot @searchingwardrobes @donteattheappleshook @jrob64 @the-darkdragonfly @itsfabianadocarmo  @stahlop @klynn-stormz @resident-of-storybrooke​

    #cs ff#cssns21 #cs ef au #wish kj ff #most wanted#my ff
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  • dnd-in-edelterre
    26.06.2021 - 1 mont ago

    In light of the holiday:

    One of the most famed holidays in Edelterre is The Day of the Lycanthrope, or Lycanthropy day. On the 15th day of the tenth month (Chandri 15th), the biggest full moon of the year graces the sky. On this day every year, lycanthropes are completely out of control of their own minds, and are victims of their own curse. Civilians are advised to stay inside and protect themselves this Chandri 15th.

    HELP WANTED!

    5 gold will be offered to any mercenaries willing to guard their local city from the terror of the lycanthropes this holiday! If you are interested, see your local guard post!

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  • aion-rsa
    26.06.2021 - 1 mont ago

    Why Werewolves Within Isn’t Your Typical Werewolf Movie

    https://ift.tt/eA8V8J

    The small town of Beaverfield is much like many others across the nation in 2021. There is political polarization, longtime residents suspicious of newcomers, a stark wealth gap, infidelity, gossip, and at least one guy who is either a scary loner or just wants to be left the hell alone. But in the new film Werewolves Within what really sets Beaverfield apart is their lycanthrope problem.

    Based loosely on the multiplayer Ubisoft VR game of the same name, the film — which is now playing in theaters and hits Digital Rental & VOD on July 2 — is a horror-comedy whodunit where a handful of locals are locked down during a winter storm while a monster hides amongst them.

    Directed by Josh Ruben (Scare Me) with a script by novelist Mishna Wolff (I’m Down), Werewolves Within shares cinematic DNA with Clue and Knives Out on the mystery side, as well as The Thing and An American Werewolf in London on the horror end, with a little Fargo thrown in for good measure.

    The audience enters the world of Beaverfield through the POV of plucky pushover Finn (Sam Richardson from Veep), the new forest ranger in town before introducing Cecily (Milana Vayntrub, Die Hart), a welcoming postal worker hungry for a new person to meet. Through her, a cast of quirky townsfolk come into focus as the storm approaches, and everyone bickers over the proposed oil pipeline that will bring in big money but is environmentally devastating. And that’s before the corpse is discovered.

    What makes the mystery of Werewolves Within especially fun is Beaverfield’s residents are played by a roster of character actors who bounce off one another in the way the cast of Clue did: Harvey Guillén (What We Do In The Shadows), George Basil (Crashing), Sarah Burns (Barry), Michael Chernus (Tommy), Catherine Curtin (Orange is the New Black), Wayne Duvall (The Hunt), Rebecca Henderson (Russian Doll), Cheyenne Jackson (30 Rock), Michaela Watkins (Brittany Runs A Marathon), Glenn Fleshler (True Detective).

    Ruben and Wolff joined Den of Geek for a Paranormal Pop Culture Hour to discuss their collaboration on the video game adaptation. In the following interview, they likewise talk of a shared love of werewolf flicks, as well as why murder mysteries and creature features go hand-in-paw.

    Note: Quotes edited lightly for clarity and length

    What were the werewolves you loved growing up? Mishna, since your last name is Wolff, I think that entitles you to go first.

    Mishna Wolff: There’s so many. Joe Dante’s The Howling, for sure. Definitely Wolfen, starring Albert Finney. That’s a great werewolf story. He’s actually wasted in that movie, as well. I would say Silver Bullet has a fun kids’ story in it. 

    Obviously, An American Werewolf in London, but I was always like, “More decaying humans! Can we get more decaying humans on the screen?” I feel like he uses them so sparingly. I could’ve done twice as many decaying humans.

    Josh, what scratched your lycanthropic itch?

    Josh Ruben: Clawed, even. I mean, the first one that really hit me was the guy in Monster Squad. He was a blue collar, everyday fellow who you really seem to feel his excruciating pain and torment, and that really hit me. There was something about the kids that kind of went after all the entities in that movie, but the werewolf in that one was particularly terrifying, and so much of it came through his performance. I think between him and the one in Silver Bullet, ridiculous as it ultimately ended up looking, that is a dreadful — as in a good dreadful — terrifying film. It really felt like what would really happen if you and your drunk uncle had to take on a lycan. 

    Later in life, my most recent favorite is Late Phases. I think that movie is so good. It’s so brilliant, and it’s also a Hudson Valley production. I was shocked by how much I loved that one. That’s a new fave.

    Video game adaptations are so often not very good movies. So what was your approach? Was it to just sort of toss away the entire game? What elements do you think were important to preserve from the VR game?

    Mishna Wolff: The feel. I mean, I feel like that was always the thing. All screenwriters who you talk to about adaptations, and they talk about, “What do you owe the source material?” I think you owe it the feel, and I feel like certainly, in the midpoint of the movie, when everyone’s huddled in the inn and they’re trying to ferret out who the werewolf is, it does feel like that video game, even though it’s a different era.

    How did you set out to play with archetypes and the role women often play in these films?

    Mishna Wolff: The movie started out with a lot of thinking about archetypes. I happen to love movies with pretty clearly-drawn archetypes. I like archetypes. I feel like it’s reassuring when you walk into a movie and you feel like “Oh, I know who that guy is.” 

    I like upsetting archetypes and having little things be different about the archetype than you expect, but feminism certainly plays a role in those archetypes and women in film haven’t always been given life and death stakes, so that was a huge thing that I was thinking of.

    Josh, in Scare Me, there is a werewolf sequence. Was that in a strange way, a being a bit of an audition of sorts for Werewolves Within as your second feature?

    Josh Ruben: I think it ended up being the case in Scare Me because it is the creature that freaks me out the most and that story, silly as it is, the first one out in Scare Me, is an idea I’ve had in the back of my head forever that just kind of collects cobwebs. It’s all crazy coincidence, and I’m happy to find my brand in recessed shadows, creatures in the dark and quirky, emasculated human beings. I think I’d be fine to tell those stories again and again.

    Why do werewolves and murder mysteries pair well?

    Josh Ruben: Going back to Silver Bullet, you have that priest character who, once it was revealed he was the big bad, it became that digging your fingernails into your knees, like “Oh my God, they have no idea they’re in the presence of this awful thing.” That’s terrifying, more so than a vampire or pretty much anything else. It’s the true movie monster, where they can walk amongst us during the day and be our brother, best friend, mother, father, whatever, but turn out to be the most violent thing, and terrifying thing imaginable.

    And we can all have a monster within?

    Josh Ruben: It makes sense, in the allegory of it all. In a film like this, everyone can be implicated. The allegory and theme of it all is, we all have violent, dreadful thoughts every once in a while when pushed to our limits. Even Sam’s character, as wonderful a protagonist as he is, he’s pushed to his limit, as well. Every character could have reason to be a werewolf, hence the wonderful mystery of it all, but it played lockstep for me. It’s a testament to Mishna’s incredible work. I just opened it and was just like, this feels like Arachnophobia and Fargo.

    Sam Richardson’s Finn is the new ranger in town and he’s a nice guy. But there’s the notion that either nice guys finish last, or nice guys are too good to be true. So why are we so against nice guys?

    Mishna Wolff: Well, yeah, a person can be too good to be true. There’s a couple of nice guys in this movie that are suspicious, and the reason Finn is such a nice guy is because the movie that we fashioned is his worst nightmare. He’s afraid of conflict, he’s a nice guy and he’s about to enter the epicenter of meanness. This movie’s designed to torture him and break him, and it almost does.

    Josh Ruben: Nice guys have werewolves within them, mean guys have werewolves within them. Oh, it’s just fascinating to play with the archetype because I think Bundy was a nice guy, at least in his circle, and Gacy, so it’s fun to play with those kind of expectations. There’s a wonderful moment, without giving anything away, where even this wonderful protagonist reaches a breaking point where he has to match everyone else and it should raise the question “Well, shit, could it be the nicest character of all?”

    Was there any version of this movie where there may not have been an actual werewolf?

    Mishna Wolff: No. I thought about going there and just having it be more cerebral and meta, but I always start everything with the end in mind. Josh was super collaborative, and he had some tweaks on the ending. The werewolf is the werewolf, and that didn’t change, but he made some really nice changes to the ending and I thought it worked really quite well.

    Josh, what did you discover about the challenges of tackling a werewolf movie where you’re ultimately going to have to show the monster?

    Josh Ruben: When it came down to the werewolf, it’s like, “Well, we don’t need to see skin breaking, we know what this is going to be, we can evoke that visceral transformation and the terror of it all, but let’s just get to it.” At that point, when it came to the werewolf itself, it was nothing too extravagant. It was just like, “Oh shit, this is going to happen.” 

    Also, within the mythology of this character and this thing, and how fast it killed, it was fun to think about it having control over its changing as part of its, again, mythology and how it went about its business.

    Mishna Wolff: That was such a conversation in the room, too, about, “Can it control? It can’t control? How come it can control? What kind of … ” It’s like “Doesn’t matter. Trust me.”

    Josh Ruben: No one will be writing mean letters if they’re along for the ride, if they feel taken care of, whether the claws retract or extend, whether they change quickly or not, it’s just got to be a fun ride.

    Mishna Wolff: I think the creature features that Josh and I grew up loving were always done a little bit on the cheap with the exception of maybe The Thing and Alien, which were really crazy expensive, but I think that’s part of the fun of the creature feature, to me at least

    Josh, with Scare Me, you used the word “incel,” which you filmed before it was part of our lexicon. Now, this is neighbor against neighbor, people are either hiding the truth or rejecting it, and there is the idea that being grouped together can lead to your own death. You could not have predicted the relevancy of this, so how is it landing for you now?

    Josh Ruben: It’s pretty phenomenal when people like Michaela Watkins improvise a line like “Antifa.” You think “Oh, that’s going to be the shelf-life joke that will end up on the cutting room floor.” And no, it remains to be one of the more relevant pieces of the film and of this character. 

    I mean, she’s a Karen. She was a Karen before the Karen thing. With incel, it’s funny, too, because Aya Cash was the first one. She improvised that line, “What are you, an incel?” I didn’t know what the word meant and Fred quite was.

    It’s unfortunate how relevant it is, but I’m thrilled that it is because I’d like to think that the film is a ride so, hopefully, regardless of what people take away from it, regardless of the relevance of it all, I’d like to think that it’s coming out at a time where, after the trauma of it all, from the insurrect-y through the pandem-y, that people can at least forget the trauma of the past 16 and a half months and sort of go for the ride. We’re offering less bleak fare; we’re offering more fun fare coming out of this dark chapter, but it’s both wonderful and terrifying that it’s so relevant and will remain to be. There will always be people who are narrow-minded in small corners of the world and narrow-minded in the most liberal corners of the world, as well. The newcomers are no better than the townies, in some cases, in many cases in the film. Mishna Wolff: I think we were banking that people would be ready to laugh at everything that’s gone on, at this point, that people would be ready … Can we make fun of it now? Is it too soon? No?

    cnx.cmd.push(function() { cnx({ playerId: "106e33c0-3911-473c-b599-b1426db57530", }).render("0270c398a82f44f49c23c16122516796"); });

    Werewolves Within is in theaters now, and will be available on Digital Rental & VOD July 2, 2021

    The post Why Werewolves Within Isn’t Your Typical Werewolf Movie appeared first on Den of Geek.

    from Den of Geek https://ift.tt/3haodRW

    #aion-rsa #Den of Geek
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  • thenixkat
    15.06.2021 - 1 mont ago

    Miscellaneous werewolves

    - Werewolves who are most active when the moon is new and only tiny slivers of light. They do not wish to be seen and know that the full moon means for worse hunts. They can track well enough via scent and can hear the rhythm of your blood, who needs to see? They throw their voices to lure you into an ambush in the pitch black night.

    - The group of sharp toothed nobles, who sleep all day and party all night, with hypnotic voices, and drink fresh blood. The stake and the garlic turn out to be useless b/c they’re werewolves not vampires.

    - The gardener finds themself strangely drawn to the drink after cutting those weird flowers with the sticky sap out of their employer’s yard. Strange, they normally hate alcohol but as the moon grows rounder in the night sky they find themself becoming something of a lush. Then they get blackout drunk the night of the full moon wakening to shredded clothing and a strange meaty taste in their mouth the next morning. On the news is a story about a string of vicious animal attacks and they can recognize a piece of the shirt they’d been wearing at the scene of the crime. They resolve to stay away from alcohol but the siren call is strong. Is there an AA for this?

    - Person finds themself growing fur and fangs and howling at the moon after surviving a string of vampire attacks in the community. What’s a new werewolf to do but hunt down the undead fucker that did this to them?

    - A wolf bitten by a bear suddenly finds themself transforming into a bald biped during the daytime. Trying to find a cure to their new humanity infection they accidently get adopted by a coven of werewolves.

    - A werewolf finds themself forcibly cured after being tricked into drinking a bottle of lycanthropous water. Pissed as hell said ex-werewolf shakes up the local supernatural community for a lead of where to find more lycanthropous water to change back to normal. And get revenge on the fucker who decided to cure them without their consent. 

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  • maxineswritingcenter
    16.05.2021 - 2 monts ago

    Bray Road - Fox Mulder x non binary!reader part 6

    Fic Drop 2021

    Mulder just finished speaking with the Sheriff when he spotted his partner. (Y/N) looked so tired. They were holding their head in their hands and had been like that ever since the boys in blue zipped up the body bags for Jason, his mother, and the other patient that had been attacked. He walked to them slowly and placed a hand on their shoulder. 

    “You alright?” He asked. (Y/N) took a deep breath and looked up. 

    “I don’t know. I know everything that happened was real, but it feels...I never thought that I would experience that again.” They shrugged, “On the bright side, the cops believed my story this time.” 

    Mulder smiled a little and nodded towards the car, “C’mon, let’s head back to the motel.” They stood and the two began walking towards the rental car. 

    “What about Winterfield?” 

    “Cops are going to search the office now to find evidence of the albuterol and anything related to the DEA. The courthouse is going to have a search warrant by the morning.” 

    “Mulder.” They said as Mulder started opening his door, “The full moon is tomorrow.” 

    He paused for a moment and looked up in the dark sky and saw the moon was almost full. He looked back at his partner, “We’ll get him. I promise.” 

    The next morning, both agents made their way to the pediatrician’s office where there was already a search in place. They met with the sheriff as he was walking out. 

    “Agents,” He greeted them, “We found some research regarding the albuterol in a safe in the crawl space.” He handed some of the paper work to (Y/N). They looked them over. 

    “It’s like the scrawling of a mad man.” The sheriff said, "Talking about rituals and turning the weak into warriors. As far as we know, there are two other kids in the reports. Both of which were killed in the last attack. According to their parents, they only used their inhalers for emergencies or not at all.” 

    “So the DEA was never able to take hold in their systems.” Mulder concluded, "That also means that Winterfield was trying to make more of him."

    "That seems to be the case," The sheriff looked back at (Y/N), who was still reading, their face paler than before. The writings from when they were a child were disturbing, describing their body in great detail and how they were perfect to create the master race of lycanthropes.

    "We suspect that he's in hiding, but we believe that he's going to come back for you, Agent (Y/L/N)." They looked up at the sheriff's words.

    "What?" Their heart dropped.

    "We would like to place you under house arrest at your motel until we can apprehend Winterfield. You will be with the best big game hunter in the area, as well as two deputies." The sheriff motioned to the large camo wrapped pickup truck in the other end of the parking lot.

    "I-...Right. of course." (Y/N) looked down at the ground. Their fingers gripping the paperwork.

    Mulder took notice to their hesitation, "Sheriff, can you give us a minute?" The sheriff nodded and went to speak with the hunter in the truck.

    "(Y/L/N), what is it?"

    They finally looked up from the papers to Mulder. He seemed genuinely concerned about them. There was a calming sense about him that made them want to relax, but, in this situation, it was nearly impossible.

    "I understand why I need to be under lock and key, I do. But I don't feel right about not going after him too." They felt tears burn at their eyes. They were so emotionally exhausted after years of fear just culminating to this moment and they wouldn't get the resolve they wanted.

    "Is this about your parents?" He asked.

    They glanced at this eyes again, then stared back at his tie, "Partially."

    "Aw, you're not worried about me, are ya?" He chuckled.

    They met his eyes again, so green and full of determination. It's what (Y/N) liked about him. Fox Mulder may have been known around the bureau as Spooky Mulder, but no one saw the passion. All they saw were the Xfiles. And (Y/N) thought Mulder liked to keep it that way. He had been ridiculed his entire career. But he believed the weird, he believed the strange.

    "Skinner didn't assign you as my partner," They blurted out without thinking much. But the fuel was already in the fire, they had to elaborate, "I made up the case file. I kept it secret from my friends at the office because I didn't want them to treat me like I was a joke. I took the case to Skinner and asked to be your partner. I knew you would take it seriously. I knew you would believe me." (Y/N) placed a hand on his arm and smiled weakly, "Please be careful. I don't want to lose anyone else." Before Mulder could speak, he watched (Y/L/N) make their way to the camo truck to speak with the big game hunter and the sheriff.

    -

    At the motel, they had been given a box of evidence from Winterfield's home to look through. The big game hunter, Rodger, was in the corner of the room facing the door, cleaning the silver bullets he had been given to him from the local jeweler in town. He was an interesting looking guy, the was tall and lean. But his hair was styled so one side of his head was shaved to the skin, 3 long pink scars ran from his crown to his temple.

    He noticed their staring and nodded, "Bear."

    "Excuse me?"

    He pointed to the scars, "Grizzly in Alberta. Probably stood about twelve feet tall. Smacked me right here but I put three slugs between it's eyes. So I can handle your werewolf just fine." He loaded to shells into his shotgun.

    "Bears act on instinct. When they feel their family or their territory is threatened they attack. This werewolf thinks just as well as he does as a human." They looked out the window and saw the sun lower in the sky, making their stomach feel like there was a sack of rocks pulling them down.

    "You have nothing to worry about, uh...what are your uhh..."

    "It's Agent."

    -

    The search in the woods around Winterfield's house wasn't showing any sign that he had been there recently. But what they did find was a body. In the basement of his home they found a decaying body shackled to the wall, almost mummified. But the anatomy was inhuman.

    Mulder looked was looking over a map of the area that they had already searched, needing to use a flashlight now that darkness was setting in. He looked up when he saw the coroner, Dr. Sherman, making her way towards him and taking her gloves off.

    "I've seen a lot of weird things, but nothing as crazy as that." She said.

    "How so?"

    "Well, when the guy died his bones had grown so much that they were splintering. His teeth were so large they cracked his jawbone. He died in a lot of pain." She said.

    "Any similarities to the Mulligan boy?" The sheriff, who had walked up behind Mulder asked.

    "Sort of. There were signs of the splintering and the cracks in the jaw but they had healed almost instantaneously. But I'm sure when the lab comes back with the results, they'll show DEA like you said, agent Mulder."

    "Any luck?" He turned back to the sheriff.

    "None. The dogs can't pick up a damn thing. And the tracks we saw lead off into the woods disappeared about a mile in."

    Before Mulder could speak, his mobile phone started going off in his pocket.

    "Excuse me," He said, stepping away from the group and standing by his car before answering, "Mulder."

    "So we found some info on Winterfield." Frohike began, "Or lack of info."

    "I couldn't find any family history on him. That is, until I found these articles from the sixties." Byers said, "His name was Lyle Montgomery. And when he was fourteen he went missing for a month in northern Michigan and when he was found, he was covered in blood but completely unharmed."

    "There's another news article a month later from the same area saying that an entire family but one was mauled by a bear. The survivor was relocated, but we can't tell where because the adoption was closed." Langley chimed in, "But it was around the same time that we found the yearbook for Elkhorn high school showing their star quarterback."

    "Winterfield." Mulder answered, "Thanks guys."

    "You got it, Gunmen out." Frohike signed off and the line went dead.

    As Mulder walked back to the group his phone rang again, he answered, "Mulder."

    "Hey Fox, I think that uh we're not gonna find this guy. He outsmarted us." (Y/L/N) said.

    "When did we start on a first name basis, (Y/N)? And it's not over, we're gonna find him." He said, his eyebrows knitted together in confusion at his partner's use of his first name. Not even Scully called him by his first name.

    "No, I think I'm just gonna go home ."

    "We can't go now. What happened to you wanting to finally end this? To move on from all this?" He was closer to the sheriff and the coroner now, who gave him confused looks as well.

    "Fox, I need to go back home." They said again, more sternly this time.

    Suddenly, his eyes widened, "(Y/L/N), is he there?"

    "Yeah, I just need to hurry up and get home." There voice shook then, "I've decided to leave the bureau and just go home." They took a deep breath, sounding a little choked up.

    "Goodbye, Fox." The line went dead.

    "We need to get to the motel right now, he's got (Y/L/N)." Mulder had barely gotten the phone back in his pocket before running with the sheriff to his truck and leading the department towards the motel.

    -

    (Y/N) hung up the phone, a shaky hand setting it back down on the receiver. They avoided looking in the corner of the room where the majority of Rodger was still in the corner. They looked back at Winterfield. His hands were larger than usual and covered in dark hair. His eyes glowed red. He was spattered in blood from the deputies that he been outside and the big game hunter.

    "You know he doesn't believe me." They said.

    "Oh I know." There was a gravel to his voice that made it sound more animal, "But he's gotta write something when the FBI starts asking where you are." He grabbed their arm with his massive hand and began dragging them out of the room through the broken doorway.

    "Wait!" They shouted, "Let me grab my bag. It'll be more believable for the crime scene photos."

    "Fine," Winterfield let go, "Hurry up." He seemed on edge, turning his head from side to side as if he could hear something coming. They went to the side of the bed where their bag laid, there was blood from the hunter on it. Out of the corner of their eye, they saw the silver bullets.

    Winterfield began angry, "Come on!" He grabbed them by the back of their neck.

    "My bag!"

    "Screw the bag!" He growled, pulling them outside. In the distance, they both saw the red and blue lights flashing and the sirens screaming the distance.

    -

    The cars screeched to a stop, the entire sheriff's department pointing their guns. Mulder called to the others, "Don't shoot, he's got a hostage!"

    Then Winterfield seemed to shift before his very eyes, growing a long snout and large animal like arms and legs, all covered in thick dark hair. Still standing on his hind legs, he grabbed (Y/N) by their middle and took off into the woods near the motel.

    "MULDER!" They called back, their voice fading into the darkness.

    "(Y/L/N)!" He called back, leading the department and the canine unit into the woods after Winterfield.

    "Mulder!" Their voice was farther away now.

    "(Y/L/N)!" He stopped when he no longer saw tracks, looking around for any signs, "(Y/L/N)!"

    ------------------------------------------------------------------

    Likes, Comments, and Reblogs are appreciated! 

    Read part 7 here!

    Taglist List:

    - @theres-a-dog-outside-omg

    - @bi-andready-tocry

    - @nyotamalfoy

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  • cheshirelibrary
    22.04.2021 - 3 monts ago
    #cheshire library #podcasts for readers #podcasts for book lovers #bookish podcasts#fiction podcasts
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  • siriusmydeer
    25.03.2021 - 4 monts ago
    #sirius black x you #sirius black x daughter!reader #sirius black x gryffindor!reader #sirius black x ravenclaw!reader #sirius black x slytherin reader #sirius black x remus lupin #sirius black x oc #sirius black x marlene mckinnon #sirius black #sirius black x reader #sirius black fluff #sirius black fanfiction #sirius black fic #harry potter fanfiction #harry potter smut #harry potter
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  • transkakashi
    02.03.2021 - 4 monts ago

    I realized i never really post about ursula’s plot so here’s a summary of her backstory up until the events of the campaign:

    - if you don’t know, ursula arctos is a human bloodhunter (order of the lycan). her lycan form is a werebear (specifically a moon bear)

    -ursula had a pretty good childhood, unlike literally every other oc of mine. she has two dads, maurice and haemire.  maurice is a quiet human goatherd who used to be a powerful mercenary called Maurice The Grizzly, but abandoned the life in favor of a quiet life with his husband. haemir is an elven wizard/artifcer who met maurice on a job and convinced him that supposed god-given glory wasn’t worth a short life of misery and hardship

    -ursula herself is a pretty solid combination of both of her fathers- maurice taught her combat skills and leadership and haemir taught her all about magic and the joys of learning (although she is absolutely terrible at spellwork itself) 

    -ursula was always a restless child and always felt too big for her tiny little village, so when she turned 18 she decided to become an adventurer herself. she enrolled in the local bloodhunter academy, the Silverbite Academy. although bloodhunters are generally seen as creepy freaks, she had always thought they were cool. she viewed studying at the academy as the perfect way to mesh her interests together- the academy trains its students in combat but also has its students take intensive courses in things like monster lore, religion, history, and magical studies (”know thy enemy”, etc). since she sucks so bad at casting, she figured the next best thing was to just read and learn about magic as much as she could. plus blood magic isnt quite actual magic, but it’s as close as she can get.

    -students study at the academy for four years (students are usually 18 when they start, it’s basically college, but anyone can join at any time), and then do a year of work in the field under the mentorship of an experienced bloodhunter. the valedictorian of each graduating class gets to study under the headmaster of the academy. silverbite is specifically order of the lycan, so the night after graduation all graduates are given the gift of lycanthropy in an extremely secretive ceremony. students aren’t told anything about it besides the fact that there is a chance they could die during the process (it’s basically the joining from dragon age), and that afterword they will receive an earring in the shape of a silver fang as both a badge of honor and as a way to control their lycanthropy. the ceremony is affectionately referred to as “getting your fangs” by students, bc 1) you get your lycanthrope form and 2) the earrings

    -on her first day at school, ursula met an elvan man named sasha ilihice. the two immediately hated each other and were rivals for their entire time at the academy, constantly trying to outdo each other in everything and competing for the valedictorian spot. eventually, the two of them realized that they had developed feelings for the other, and began dating in their senior year. shortly after, they graduated as co-valedictorians of their class.

    -that night, after they graduated, sasha and ursula got super drunk and realized “hey we might die tomorrow so fuck it let’s get married” and then had the dnd equivalent of a vegas drivethru wedding. 

    -ursula made it through the ceremony fine, but sasha did not. he didn’t die, but he came very close. the process wreaked havoc on his body, turned his hair white, and left him very weak. he couldn’t even transform all the way. he was still given a fang and was allowed to do his year of mentorship in the field, but he struggled for the first time in his life and was left feeling very resentful and angry. sasha was the son of nobles, and his whole life his parents raised him with insanely high expectations and made sure he always maintained a perfect image. he hated that he looked so pathetic, and hated that others were better than him and looked down upon him. he felt entitled to success, and when his life didn’t turn out the way he planned he kinda flipped out

    -ursula and sasha completed their year of field work studying under the headmaster of the academy, octavius hu. octavius is beloved by all students of the academy and is seen as a semi parental figure, and the three stayed close friends even after the year was up. ursula even helped babysit octavius’s daughter, olivia, who immediately took a shining to her. ursula was like olivia’s Cool Big Sister, and she really looked up to her. 

    -sasha and ursula moved into a little house on the grounds of the academy (there’s a whole little residential area on campus that graduates move in to bc 1) the academy also serves as the HQ for all the bloodhunters in the area, and so those who are active in the field have to stay close so they can get assignments and stuff and also 2) bloodhunters and lycans are generally disliked so honestly there’s nowhere else for them to go). as the years went on, sasha and ursula’s marriage became strained.they’re basically those people that marry their high school sweetheart right after graduation only to wake up years later and realize that they are completely different people than they were when they got married and that maybe they rushed into things, but they’ve been together for so long that they don’t get divorced bc they don’t know anything else

    - also sasha became resentful and jealous of ursula and her success, and ursula coddled sasha and treated him as though he were something to save, which only made things worse.

    -about five or six years after they graduated, strange things began to happen around the academy. people’s tempers became short, fights were breaking out, stuff like that. sasha, ursula, and octavius, strangely, seemed to be at the epicenter of it. sasha especially seemed to be especially on edge at all times. 

    -tensions came to a head one day when ursula and sasha were out on a monster hunting job. while in her lycan form, ursula just completely lost control of herself and ended up going berserk sasha, too, seemed to be driven into a frenzy, and the two of them ended up killing some civilians. the only thing that snapped ursula out of it was the fact that, somehow, sasha was able to fully transform. she had never seen him do that before, and immediately figured out that obviously something was very, very wrong

    -ursula poured herself into research, and came up with a theory about what was going on: someone in the academy had become corrupted by malar, the god of evil lycanthropes, and the corruption was spreading among the graduates. basically it’s magic rabies

    -ursula presented her findings to octavius and sasha in the headmaster’s officce. sasha and her ended up in a fight, and as she turned to storm away he grabbed her from behind and slit her throat in a fit of fury. as ursula lay bleeding out, sasha revealed to her and octavius that it was he who had made the deal with malar in exchange for the power that was stolen from him

    -ursula died, went to hell, and some time later ran into a party of adventurers. she agreed to help them with their quest in exchange for help busting out of hell

    -they made it out, and ursula realized that she had been dead for seven years. she’s still caught halfway between life and death, and still has an open wound where her neck was slashed. she covers it with a choker, but can never forget that it’s there and can never forgive who gave it to her

    #if you read all of this i love you #i will post a summary of what's been going on with her in the campaign soon #cause a lot has happened with her storyline #i joined at level ten and we've been playing for months lol #ursula arctos
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  • the-mists-of-asgaard
    20.01.2021 - 6 monts ago

    Bands List (Part 12: L)

    Disclaimer: My passion and like for the respective bands does not mean that I support them outside of the music-world. I just like the songs, for whatever reason. Also, this took hours of research and mental exercises and checks through older lists I had made in the past, however I might be forgetting some bands, or might have accidentally put the same band twice (blame the human natural error). With this being said, let’s go! L: L'Éclat du Déclin, L'Hiver, L'Impero delle Ombre, L'Infinito Abisso dell'Anima, L'Ordre du Temple, (The) L.A.R.V.A.E. Group, L.O.R.E., La Campa el Espino, La Cuenta, La Division Mentale, La Mer, La Torture des Ténèbres, Laash, Laborer, Laburnum Diver, Labyrinth Entrance, Labyrinthine, Labyrinthique, Lacerated Dominion, Laceration, Laceration, Laceration Mantra, Lachrima Corphus Dissolvens, Lachrymalice, Lachrymanopsia, Lachrymose, LaColpa, Lacrimacorpus Dissolvens, Lacrimae Mortalium, Lacrymae Rerum, Lacrimas Profundere, Lacuna Coil, Lacus Somniorum, Lady Carnage, Lady Luna and the Devil, Lady Lizard, Laetitia in Holocaust, Lagras, Lahmia, Laid in Stone, Laid Wasted, Lair of the Minotaur, Lake Baikal, Lake Natron, Lake of Corpses, Lake of Depression, Lake of Tears, Lakei, Lalssu, Lamassu, Lamb of God, Lambton Worm, Lament, Lament Configuration, Lamentari, Lamentations, Lamentations of the Ashen, Lamentum, Lâmmia, Lamort, (The) Lamp of Thoth, Lampreic Pool, Lance of Longinus, Land of Fallen Dreams, Land of Fog, Landcrusher, Lándevir, Landforge, Landmine Marathon, Lands of Memories, Landskap, Landvættr, Languish, Laniakea, Lantlôs, LanzerRath, Laochra, Laptev's Epidemia, Lara Korona, Lararium, Lascaille's Shroud, Lasen, Laser Dracul, Lashblood, Lashmush, Lasselanta, Last Breath, Last Dive, Last Frontier, Last Heritage, Last House on the Left, Last Kind of Life, Last Minute to Jaffna, (The) Last of Lucy, Last Question, Last Resistance, Last Rosary, (The) Last Savior of God, Last Seen Wearing, Last Shadow, (The) Last Surrealist, (The) Last Three Winters, Last Word, Laster, Lástima, Late, Late Night Venture, Latir, Latitude Egress, Latitudes, Laudanum, Laughter, Lautreamont, Lauxnos, Lavagoat, (The) Law, Law of Contagion, Law of the Tongue, Layment, Lazarath, Lazarus Blackstar, Lazerkaat, Láðspell, Le Chant Funebre, Le Complot des Lépreux, Le Délire des Négations, Le Menhir, Lead Desert Blues, Leannan Shee, Leather Glove, Leave, Leave's Eyes, Lebensgefahr, Lebensnacht, Lebensraum, Lecherous Nocturne, Lectamynol, Lectoblix, Lednik, Leechfeast, Left Hand Path, Left Hand Path, Left Horn of the Ram, Left to Starve, Left to Vanish, Leftmuenang, Legacy of Cynthia, Legacy of Fire, Legacy of Silence, Legalize Crime, Legbah, Legenda, Legio Inferi, Legio Sergia, Legion Massacre, Legion of Doom, Legion of the Damned, Legion of Wolves, Legionary, Legione, Legions, Legions Ablaze, Lehavoth, Lehm, Leichenbrand, Leichenfledderer, Leichenzug, Leikur, Lęk, Lelantos, Lemming Project, Lemp, Lemur Voice, Lemuria, Leng Tch'e, Lengsel, Length of Time, Lento, Leonard, Leper, Leper Divine, Leper Temple, Leporid, Leppe, Leprodermic, Leproso, Leprosy, Leprous, Les Bâtards du Nord, Les Fleurs du Mal, Lesados, Leshy, Lesion, Lesmentor, Leśne Licho, Lesser Life, Let Them Burn, Let Us Prey, Letallis, Lethaeos, Lethal Dosage, Lethal Force, Lethality, Lethargic Euphoria, Lethargy of Death, Lethargy of Silence, Letharia, Lethean, Letheia, Letheria, Lethian Dreams, Lethvm, Letters Written on Dead Leaves, Letvm Leteo, Leucosis, Level 10, Level Fields, Levels of Abandonment, Lever of Archimedes, Leviathan, (The) Leviathan, Leviathan, Leviathan Cross, Leviathan Rising, Leviathans Breath, Levitas, (The) Levitation Hex, Lex Talionis, LH05, Lhind, Li Nus, Liber Necris, Liber Null, Libertatis Amore, Liberteer, Liblikas, Librium, Lich, Lichens, Lichmistress, Lichtblick, Lie in Ruins, Lie Sol, Life in Dive, Life in Vain, Life Is Hell, Life Is Pain, Life Memories, Life of Agony, Life Suffers Defeat, Lifechapters, Lifeless, Lifeless Dreams... Pale Illusions, Lifeless Gaze, Lifelong, Lifelover, Lifetaker, (The) Lifted Veil, Ligeia Wept, Light Among Shadows, Light Being, Light Field Reverie, Light this City, Lightcrusher, Lightless, Lightmaker, Lightning Swords of Death, Lightpath, Ligæder, Likåar, Like a Gossamer, Like Drone Razors Through Flesh Sphere, Like Moths to Flames, Likvann, Lilith's Breed, Lilja, Lillake, Limb, Limb from Limb, Limbonic Art, Limerance, Liminal Shroud, Limos, Lindisfarne, Line of Durin, Line of Scrimmage, Linwe, (The) Lion's Daughter, Lionheart, Lionskull, Liosber, (The) Liquescent Horror, Liquid Graveyard, Liquid Rain, Liquid Shit, Liquid Space 9, Liquid Stones Dancing, Liquid Viscera, Liquorworks, Litany, Lithopaedion, Lithotome, Little Dead Bertha, Little Hole Filled, Livarkahil, Livercage, Liverum, Livet Som Insats, Livhzuena, Lividity, Living Altar, Living Corpse, (The) Living Fields, Living Monstrosity, Living Sacrifice, Living Through Ghosts, Livløst, Livores Mortis, Lizard Professor, Lizzard Wizzard, Liłith, Ljuska, Llung, Llvme, Lo!, Lo-Pan, Lo-Ruhamah, Loath, Loather, Loathfinder, Loathing, Lobera, Löbo, Lobotomist, Lobotomy Dept, Local I, Lochness, Lochrian Poem, Locomotive, Locotus, Locus Amoenus, Locus Requiescat, Locus Titanic Funus, Lodge of the Empty Bed, Loggerhead, Logic Severed, Logistic Slaughter, Logos, Loincloth, Lombolo, Lomera, (The) Lone Madman, Lone Wanderer, Lonely Star, Loneshore, Lonesome October, Long Distance Calling, Long Since Dark, Longbarrow, Lonkkavika, Lönndom, Looking Glass, (The) Loom of Time, Loose Unit, Lör, Lord, Lord Agheros, Lord Almighty, Lord Amun, Lord Belial, Lord Crow, Lord Dahthar, Lord Dead, Lord Dying, Lord Humungus, Lord Impaler, Lord Loss, Lord Mantis, Lord Mordor, Lord Mountain, Lord of Pagathorn, Lord of the Grave, Lord of the North, Lord of the Void, Lord of War, Lord Shades, Lord Thanatos, Lord Vampyr, Lord Vicar, Lord Vigo, Lord Wind, Lord Woland, Lordamor, Lords of Bastard, Lords of Illusion, Lords of the Cemetery, Lords of the High Ones, Lords of Venus, Lore, Lore Liege, Lorg Anfaid, Lorna Shore, Losing All, Losing Skin, Loss, Loss, Loss of Charity, Loss of Light, Loss of Self, Loss Spectra of Pure, Lost Brethren, Lost Conception, Lost Continent, Lost Dreams, Lost Fortune, Lost Hours, Lost in Emptiness, Lost in the Gray Days, Lost Insen, Lost Orb, Lost Realms, Lost Regrets, Lost Shade, (The) Lost Sun, Lost to the Void, Lost Ubikyst in Apeiron, Lóstregos, Lotus Eater, Lotus Sutra, (The) Lotus Throne, Louching, Louded, Loudness of Violence, Louisiana Sadness, Lousy Riders, Love // Paranoia, Love Your Witch, Loviatar, Lovijatar, Low Flying Hawks, Low Gravity, Low Levels of Serotonin, Lowbau, Lowcaster, Lowen, Lower Parts of Human Sludge, Lowered, LowMist, Lowtide, LSDoom, Luce d'Inverno, Lucian the Wolfbearer, Lucid Awakening, Lucid Nightmare, Lucidity, Lucifairy, Lucifer Giant, (The) Lucifer Principle, Lucifer's Cold Embrace, Luciferelli, Luciferian Insectus, Luciferica, Lucifers Corpus, Lucifuge, Lucifungus, Lucky Thirteen, Luctum, Luctus, Ludicrous, Lughum, Lugubrum, (The) Lumberjack Feedback, Lumen ad Mortem, Luminous Vault, (The) Lump, Luna, Luna ad Noctum, Luna Azure, Luna in Sanguinem, Luna XIII, Luna's Call, Lunacy, Lunae Ortus, Lunar Aurora, Lunar Blood, Lunar Ghost, Lunar Hollow, Lunar Kingdom, Lunar Mantra, Lunar Shrine, Lunar Swamp, Lunar Temple, Lunarsapian, Lunatic Affliction, Lunatic Gods, Lunatic Spirit, Lune, Lungbuster, Lungrot, Lungtoucher, Luring, Lurk, Lurking Sorrow, Lûs, Lust of a Dying Breed, Lutavierje, Luthur Kloister, Lutowrat, Luty, Lux Anguis, Lux Ferre, Lux Luna, Lux Morti, Lux Occulta, Lux Serpent, Luxúria de Lillith, LVME, Lwstndrds, Lycanthropic Deathlust, Lycanthropic Winter Moon, Lychgate, Lycus, Lyfordeath, Lying Figures, Lykotonon, Lyon, Lyra, Lyrtos, Lýsis, Lysithea, Lythronax, LΛII. 

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  • jedi-bird
    16.12.2020 - 7 monts ago

    I'm tired and I have to be up incredibly early for a doctor's appointment and all I want to do right now is write about a girl scout troop selling lycan-cookies.

    "You mean cookies made out of lichen, like the moss?" the man asked, clutching his paper coffee cup just a bit tighter as the group of tiny girls surrounds him.

    "No, lycan as in lycanthrope," one impossibly small girl says, head tilted adorably to the side.

    "Every purchase helps support the local werewolf population and helps to foster peace and understanding between our communities," says another, gazing up at him with a superior look.

    "We have a lot of different flavors, including some dog friendly ones for that time of the month!"

    "Don't you want to help your community?"

    The entire troop had moved in to surround him, eyes bright as they held up the boxes.

    "Umm.... can you break a twenty?"

    #story ideas #seriously idk what I'm doing tonight #this started as a joke about magical realism with my spouse and now it's trying to become something #so I'm noting it down here in case i ever get to work on a story I've been trying to write for a year now
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  • awaylaughing
    20.10.2020 - 9 monts ago
    #awaylaughing writes#7kpp#haminxcorval lady #otp: build a better future #7kpp hamin #pippa of corval #ft. 7kpp zarad #and#7kpp clarmont #in the WORST WAY I AM SORRY CLARMONT #u just seem like the kid of guy who'd die preventing a mugging or smth heroic and seemingly senseless #quilleth #also this is over 1.5K words kasdlksas
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  • unitedstatesofsteamerica
    17.10.2020 - 9 monts ago

    Extremely Loud Opinions Presents: But Is It Really Over?

    I’ve done it at last, my friends, my readers, my companions on this Noble Quest! I’ve finished the Halfling’s Gem and with it, the entire Icewind Dale Trilogy by R.A. Salvatore (For those just arriving, here’s the one that started it all). And now I’m forcing you to look at the awful 80s cover below one last time because if I have to suffer then so do all of you.

    And I loved every second of it. 

    These books managed to capture everything that makes a DND game fun while also retaining a clear narrative that never gets bogged down by being too dark or too silly. Full of magic, mayhem, and the occasional gruesome murder, the Icewind Dale Trilogy never loses sight of that one special thing that makes every DND campaign come together. 

    THE POWER OF FRIENDSHIP AND FOUND FAMILIES.

    Oh yes, you may laugh, but that’s the secret sauce. You play DND to have fun telling a story with your friends in which you bring a motley crew of characters together to save the world and accomplish things they could never do alone. There is nothing like watching a DND party go from being a weird group of misfits to an even weirder family. And that is exactly the feeling that the 3 Braincells Party gives me. Mr. Salvatore has clearly gone through enough home games to know it too, and he writes it beautifully. 

    I’ve said it many times before but one of the most joyful experiences I’ve had reading these books is watching these Larger Than Life Characters be so genuinely kind to each other and so willing to throw down with ANYONE who doesn’t give one of their friends the respect or kindness they deserve. It’s a rare thing to see in books these days, especially high fantasy books with mostly male casts. Sure the boys of the 3 Braincells Party talk shit and have their bravado, but it’s never mean spirited and never used to tear down a friend. The toxic posturing and constant bickering that’s so common in fictional ensembles is totally absent among the 3 Braincells Party and that is what really makes The Icewind Dale Trilogy stand out for me.

    Also the slapstick. I can’t forget about the slapstick. It’s so good, you guys, you will laugh. 

    The Halfling’s Gem fully knocked it out of the park with a delightfully chaotic Third Act that ended the trilogy with a bang. So enough chatter and on with the quest! I present to you my Extremely Loud Opinions about the Third and Final Act of the Halfling’s Gem! Spoilers ahead!

    Things I ADORE about Act 3

    There is an associate of Edgy Entreri’s named Dondon. It’s like he tried to say Don Juan but was too drunk. You tried buddy!

    HA HA PASHA POOP!!! WE WERE ALL THINKING IT AND SOMEONE FINALLY SAID IT THANK YOU RANDOM MERCHANT GUY

    Omg Catti-Brie convinces someone she put a spell on him by making weird hand motions at him. I love her

    Drizzt and Catti-Brie have the nicest relationship. Drizzt is absolutely her cool uncle and they adore each other. It’s so cute!

    Wulfgar and Catti-Brie are also ADORABLE!! Their romance is very much in the background, but the little glimpses we get of it in the foreground are incredibly sweet

    YAAAASSSSSS GUENHWYVAR!!!! SAVE REGIS AND ESCAPE!!!

    Oh no! Apparently Wulfgar is too good natured looking to be intimidating!! Sweetie boy :3

    YAAAASSSSS the slapstick returns!!

    Catti-Brie gets a scratch and Wulfgar loses his mind so much that Bruenor tells her to just play dead so Wulfgar will keep raging and murder all their enemies at once

    Hell yeah hydra fight!!!! The first monster I ever fought when I was learning to play DND was a hydra and I got so many nostalgia feels

    YAAAAAASSSSSSS DRIZZT KILLED THE GROSS SUNDEW AND WRECKED EDGY ENTRERI’S MONOLOGUE

    Man, the fight between Edgy Entreri and Drizzt is brutal as hell and I love it. Way to get a shot of that much needed peril in there!

    Some guard tries to stop Wulfgar from rampaging through the thieves’ guild by hiding the main key but Wulfgar just fucking CHUCKS his ass THROUGH THE DOOR so hard he breaks it down. I stan one (1) big buff barbarian boy

    Wulfgar just accidentally found the treasure room and I can’t stop laughing

    DRIZZT FUCKING NARUTO RUNS UP A LADDER I LOVE THIS SHITTY DUMPSTER BABY DROW

    Hell yeah Wulfgar drops a chandelier on some goons Phantom of the Opera style

    Bruenor and Catti-Brie take the thieves’ guild arm in arm

    Every time the 3 Braincells Party reunites I weep with joy

    Local Thieves’ Guild Utterly Trashed by Five Man Band

    “How I love to foil hopes!” Direct quote taken from the main villain

    HOLY SHIT REGIS YOU TINY MADMAN THAT WAS COOL AS HELL. NO ONE IS ALLOWED TO TELL ME REGIS ISN’T A TOTAL BADASS OKAY

    The Gang Goes To Tartarus

    This stupid demon talks like Yoda and looks like Slenderman and I can’t take it seriously

    I’m so happy Regis and Guenhwyvar are friends

    I love how quick everyone is to FUCKING FIGHT for Catti-Brie (and any other party member) when they get hurt. I know it’s partially to make up for challenge rating but also THE POWER OF FRIENDSHIP 

    REGIS IS ASSEMBLING A CAT ARMY WITH ALL OF GUENHWYVAR’S CAT FRIENDS I AM OBSESSED WITH EVERYTHING ABOUT THIS

    There is a chapter called Interplanar Goo. That’s it. That’s what’s called

    Omg Drizzt does the Tap The Shoulder And Run trick to get around a pair of demons

    Awwwww!!! Drizzt shields both Bruenor and Catti-Brie with his own body while Bruenor tries to stabilize her and I have an EMOTION

    DRIZZT AND GUENHWYVAR REUNION FEELS

    Regis straight up brought a cat army to lead a full on coup in the thieves’ guild. I am so happy. 

    ALL HAIL GUILDMASTER REGIS

    THERE IS A DWARF NAMED DAGNABIT AND I AM SCREAMING

    Waaaaaaaaahhhh Bruenor gets his homeland back and becomes king after all!

    Drizzt adores his Found Family SO MUCH and it makes me cry

    HOLY SHIT DRIZZT HAS BEEN HANGING OUT WITH LADY ALUSTRIEL I HOPE THEY’RE DATING

    Awwwww the 3 Braincells Party reunites for a wedding what a wholesome end!!! Yay!!

    Things I DETEST about Act 3

    Wererats are the worst lycanthropes and no one will ever change my mind

    I really don’t like the implications of the city of POC being filthy and squalid. That’s Not Great Mr. Salvatore

    NO NO NO LET GUENHWYVAR GO LEAVE HER ALONE

    CATTI-BRIE NOOOOOOOO T_T

    Edgy Entreri, you’ve gotta stop being the nasty bitch who leaves fingers everywhere. It’s unhygienic and gross and it will not make Drizzt love you

    NO NO EEW I DON’T LIKE SUNDEWS TAKE IT AWAY

    Edgy Entreri’s crush on Drizzt continues to be INSANELY CREEPY and it needs to Cease and Desist

    EDGY ENTRERI NO. EW. YOU’RE GOING TO HAVE SO MANY DISEASES FROM PUTTING SEWER WATER IN YOUR MOUTH YOU NASTY BITCH

    EDGY ENTRERI YOU FANTASY RACIST PIECE OF SHIT

    CATTI-BRIE NOOOOO pt 2

    I don’t like the description “beautiful and broken” for someone clearly still alive

    Are you....trying to introduce a love triangle in here? Now? Shame! Shame Mr. Salvatore! Shame for one thousand years!

    Ugh, the knowledge that I will have to deal with a whole series in which Edgy Entreri is a main character sours his whole slithering off into the sunset never to be seen again epilogue scene

    REGIS DON’T YOU DARE ASK DRIZZT TO GIVE YOU HIS BABY

    FINAL RATING: 10/10

    As a whole, The Icewind Dale Trilogy delivers exactly what I desperately wanted but was too afraid to hope for when I first started this Noble Quest: A madcap fantasy romp with a colorful cast, crazy fun fight scenes, and a surprising amount of heart.

    FINAL SERIES RATING: 11/10, THESE ARE MY HAPPY PLACE BOOKS

    Next, I begin The Legend of Drizzt with the first book in the Dark Elf Trilogy, Homeland. I hope you’re ready for lots of Extremely Loud and Extremely Angry Opinions about drows.....

    #forgotten realms #the halfling's gem #r.a. salvatore #dungeons and dragons #drizzt do'urden#icewind dale#bruenor battlehammer#wulfgar#regis#catti-brie#artemis entreri#D&D #wizards of the coast #wotc#book reviews #Extremely Loud Opinions #these books are so good #11/10 will read again #recommend #especially to all those DND players out there #who want to read a campaign instead of listen to it #Drizzt is my dumpster son #I can't wait to read his origin story
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  • caplulet
    10.10.2020 - 9 monts ago

    Best Horror Movies Streaming on HBO Max

    Editor’s Note: This post is updated monthly. Bookmark this page and come back every month to see the new horror movies on HBO Max.

    Updated for October 2020

    What ever would we do without horror?

    So much of our daily life is built around logic and known, verifiable facts, and for some, the rest of the time must be supplemented with comforting reassurances that everything is going to be alright. Well if the last year has taught us anything… that’s not the case. Perhaps this is why horror hounds know the best way to face abstract fears is to confront them head on… and preferably with a screen in the way.

    So, with Halloween around the corner, we figured it’s time to get in touch with our illogical, terrified animal brain. That’s where horror and horror movies in particular come in. Gathered here are the best horror movies on HBO Max for your scaring needs.

    Alien

    “In space, no one can hear you scream,” the tagline for Ridley Scott’s 1979 sci-fi/horror epic promised. Well maybe they should have screened this thing in space because I’m sure all that audiences in theaters did was scream.

    Alien has since evolved into a heady, science fiction franchise that has stretched out for decades. The original film, however, is a small-scale, terrifyingly claustrophobic thriller.

    Altered States

    What if you could tap into the vast swaths of the brain you never use? What if you did and didn’t like what we found? And what if it was an absolute psychedelic rush of a cinematic experience?

    All three questions are answered in their own way during Ken Russell’s Altered States, a wild sci-fi thriller. In the film, William Hurt stars as a psychologist who begins experimenting with taking hallucinatory drugs while in a sensory depravation tank.

    Yes, he manages to expand his consciousness; he also begins to expand his physical body as it transforms beneath his skin. Or does it? Well that’s yet another good question…

    An American Werewolf in London

    Arguably the definitive werewolf movie, John Landis’ 1981 horror masterpiece has the single greatest on-screen lycanthropic transformation in movie history… and that’s only one of its appeals.

    Peppered with loving references to the werewolf movies that came before it and a few legitimate laughs to go along with the scares, An American Werewolf in London is remarkably knowing and self-aware, without ever flirting with parody.

    Read more

    Movies

    An American Werewolf in London Is Still the Best Horror Reimagining

    By David Crow

    Movies

    13 Must-See Werewolf Movies

    By Mike Cecchini

    Not enough can be said about Rick Baker’s practical effects, which extend beyond the aforementioned on-screen transformation and into one of the most gruesome depictions of a werewolf attack aftermath you’re ever likely to see. A classic of the era, it still can get under the skin whenever Griffin Dunne’s mutilated corpse rises from the grave to warn his friend to “beware the moon.”

    The Brood

    I bet you never thought placenta could look so tasty, but when Samantha Eggar’s Nola Carveth licks her newborn clean you’ll be craving seconds within the hour. She brings feline intuition to female troubles. We get it. Having a new baby can be scary. Having a brood is terrifying. Feminine power is the most horrifying of all for male directors used to being in control.

    David Cronenberg takes couples therapy one step too far in his 1979 psychological body-horror film, The Brood. When it came out critics called it reprehensible trash, but it is the writer-director’s most traditional horror story. Oliver Reed plays with mental illness like Bill Sikes played with the kids as Hal Raglan, the psychotherapist treating the ex-wife of Frank Carveth (Art Hindle). The film starts slow, unfolding its drama through cuts and bruises.

    Read more

    Movies

    Best Horror Movies on Netflix: Scariest Films to Stream

    By David Crow and 2 others

    Movies

    Katharine Isabelle on How Ginger Snaps Explored the Horror of Womanhood

    By Rosie Fletcher

    Cronenberg unintentionally modifies the body of the Kramer vs. Kramer story in The Brood, but the murderous munchkins at the external womb of the film want a little more than undercooked French toast.

    Carnival of Souls

    Carnival of Souls may be the most unlikely of chillers to appear in the Criterion Collection. Hailing from the great state of Kansas and helmed by commercial director Herk Harvey, who was looking for his big break in features, there is something hand-crafted about the whole affair. There’s also something unmistakably eerie.

    Read more

    Movies

    Carnival Of Souls: The Strange Story Behind the Greatest Horror Movie You’ve Never Seen

    By Joshua Winning

    Movies

    A24 Horror Movies Ranked From Worst to Best

    By David Crow and 3 others

    The story is fairly basic campfire boilerplate, following a woman (Candace Hilligoss) who survives a car crash but is then haunted by the sound of music and visions of the ghoulish dead–beckoning her toward a decrepit carnival abandoned some years earlier–and the acting can leave something to be desired. But the dreadful dreamlike atmosphere is irresistible.

    With a strong sense of fatalism and inescapable doom, the film takes an almost melodic and disinterested gait as it stalks its heroine to her inevitable end, presenting images of the walking dead that linger in the mind long after the credits roll.

    The Curse of Frankenstein

    Hammer is probably best remembered now for its series of Christopher Lee-starring Dracula movies. Yet its oddball Frankenstein franchise deserves recognition too. While Hammer’s efforts certainly pale in comparison to the Frankenstein movies produced by Universal Pictures in the 1930s and ’40s, the Hammer ones remain distinctly unique. Whereas the Creature was the star of the earlier films, so much so the studio kept changing the actor beneath the Jack Pierce makeup after Boris Karloff got fed up three movies in, the not-so-good doctor leads the Hammer alternatives.

    Read more

    Movies

    The Conjuring Timeline Explained: From The Nun to Annabelle Comes Home

    By Daniel Kurland

    Books

    Frankenstein Adaptations Are Almost Never Frankenstein Adaptations

    By Kayti Burt

    Indeed, between bouts of playing the almost sickeningly pious Abraham Van Helsing, Peter Cushing portrayed a perverse and dastardly Victor Frankenstein at Hammer, and it all begins with The Curse of Frankenstein. It isn’t necessarily the best movie in the series, but it introduces us to Cushing’s cruel scientist, played here as less mad than malevolent.

    It also features Christopher Lee in wonderfully grotesque monster makeup. This is the film where Hammer began forming an identity that would become infamous in the realm of horror.

    The Conjuring 2

    Making an effective, truly spooky mainstream horror film is hard enough. But The Conjuring franchise really nailed things out of the gate with a sequel that is every bit as fun and terrifying as the original.

    Patrick Wilson and Vera Farmiga return as paranormal investigators Ed and Lorraine Warren in The Conjuring 2. This time the Warrens head to Great Britain to attend to the Hodgson family, dealing with some poltergeist problems in their Enfield home. The source of the Enfield haunting’s activity contains some of the most disturbing and terrifying visuals in the entire Conjuring franchise and helped to set up a (sadly pretty bad) spinoff sequel in The Nun.

    Doctor Sleep

    Let’s be up front about this: Doctor Sleep is not The Shining. For some that fact will make this sequel’s existence unforgivable. Yet there is a stoic beauty and creepy despair just waiting to be experienced by those willing to accept Doctor Sleep on its own terms.

    Directed by one of the genre’s modern masters, Mike Flanagan, the movie had the unenviable task of combining one of King’s most disappointing texts with the opposing sensibilities of Stanley Kubrick’s singular The Shining adaptation.

    Read more

    Movies

    Doctor Sleep Director Mike Flanagan on the Possibility of The Shining 3

    By John Saavedra

    Movies

    Doctor Sleep: Rebecca Ferguson on Becoming the New Shining Villain

    By John Saavedra

    And yet, the result is an effective thriller about lifelong regrets and trauma personified by the ghostly specters of the Overlook Hotel. But they’re far from the only horrors here. Rebecca Ferguson is absolutely chilling as the smiling villain Rose the Hat, and the scene where she and other literal energy vampires descend upon young Jacob Tremblay is the stuff of nightmares. Genuinely, it’s a scene you won’t forget, for better or worse….

    Dracula Has Risen from the Grave

    Hammer Films’ fourth Dracula movie, and third to star the ever reluctant Christopher Lee, is by some fans’ account the most entertaining one. While it lacks the polish and ultimate respectability of Lee’s first outing as the vampire, Horror of Dracula (which you can read more about below), just as it is missing the invaluable Peter Cushing, Dracula Has Risen from the Grave arrived in 1968 at the crossroads of Hammer’s pulpy aesthetic. Their films had not yet devolved into exploitative shlock as they would a few years later, but the censors seemingly were throwing up their hands and allowing for the studio’s vampires to be meaner, bloodier, and sexier.

    Read more

    Movies

    Taste the Blood of Dracula: A Hidden Hammer Films Gem

    By Don Kaye

    In this particular romp, Dracula has indeed risen from the grave (yes, again!) because of the good intentions of one German monsignor (Rupert Davies). The religious leader is in central Europe to save souls, but the local denizens of a village won’t go to a church caught in the shadow of Castle Dracula. So the priest exorcises the structure, oblivious that his sidekick is also accidentally dripping blood into the mouth of Dracula’s corpse down the river. Boom he’s back!

    And yet, our fair Count can’t enter his home anymore. So for revenge, Dracula follows the monsignor to his house and lays eyes on the patriarch’s comely young niece (Veronica Carlson). You can probably figure out the rest.

    Eraserhead

    “In Heaven, everything is fine,” sings the Lady in the Radiator in Eraserhead. “You’ve got your good things, and I’ve got mine.”

    You may get something short of paradise, but the insular world David Lynch created for his 1977 experimental existential horror film is a land of mundane wonders, commonplace mysteries, and extremely awkward dinner conversations. Lynch’s first feature film is surrealistic, expressionistic, and musically comic. The minor key score and jarring black and white images bring half-lives to the industrial backdrop and exquisite squalor. At its heart though, Eraserhead is poignant, sad, and ultimately relatable on a universal level.

    Read more

    TV

    Buffy: The Animated Series – The Buffy the Vampire Slayer Spin-Off That Never Was

    By Caroline Preece

    Games

    How Scorn Turned the Art of H.R. Giger into a Nightmarish Horror Game World

    By John Saavedra

    Jack Nance’s Henry Spencer is the spiky-haired everyman. He works hard at his job, cares deeply for his deformed, mutant child, and is desperate to please his extended family. Lynch lays a comedy of manners in a rude, crude city. The film is an assault on the senses, and it might take a little while for the viewer’s brains to adjust to the images on the screen; it is a different reality, and not an entirely inviting one, but stick with it. Once you’re in with the in-laws, you’re home free. When you make it to the end, you can tell your friends you watched all of Eraserhead. When they ask you what it’s about, you can tell them you saw it.

    Eyes Without a Face

    “I’ve done so much wrong to perform this miracle,” Doctor Génessier (Pierre Brasseur) confesses in the 1960 horror film Eyes Without a Face. But he says it in French, making it all so much more poignant, allowing it to underscore everything director and co-writer Georges Franju did right. We feel for the respectable plastic surgeon forced to do monstrous things. But the monster behind the title character is his young daughter Christiane (Édith Scob). She spends the majority of the film behind a mask, even more featureless than the unpainted plastic Captain Kirk kid’s costume Michael Myers wore in Halloween. The first time we see her face though, the shock wears off quickly and we are more moved than terrified. 

    Like Val Lewton films, the horror comes from the desolate black-and-white atmosphere, shrouding the claustrophobic suspense in German Expressionism. Maurice Jarre’s score evokes a Gothic carnival as much as a mad scientist’s laboratory. After his daughter’s face is hideously disfigured in an accident, Dr. Génessier becomes obsessed with trying to restore it. We aren’t shown much, until we’re shown too much. We see his heterograft surgical procedure in real time. A woman’s face is slowly flayed from the muscle. The graphic scenes pack more of a visceral shock after all the encroaching dread.

    Godzilla

    As the original and by far still the best Godzilla movie ever produced, this 1954 classic (originally titled Gojira), is one of the many great Showa Era classics that the Criterion Collection and HBO Max are making readily available to American audiences. And if you want to watch one that is actually scary, look no further.

    In this original uncut Japanese form, the movie’s genuine dread of nuclear devastation, as well as nightly air raids, less than 10 years since World War II ended in several mushroom clouds, is overwhelming. Tapping into the real cultural anxiety of a nation left marred by the memory of its dead, as well as the recent incident of a fishing crew being contaminated by unannounced hydrogen bomb testing at Bikini Atoll, Godzilla encapsulates terror for the atomic age in a giant lizard.

    Read more

    Movies

    Godzilla: First 15 Showa Era Movies Ranked

    By Don Kaye

    Movies

    Godzilla 1998: What Went Wrong With the Roland Emmerich Movie?

    By Jim Knipfel

    And unlike the sequels there is nothing cuddly or amusing about this original Kaiju with its scarred body and legion of tumors. This is the one Godzilla movie to play it straight, and it still plays today.

    Horror of Dracula

    Replacing Bela Lugosi as Dracula was not easily done in 1958. It’s still not easily done now. Which makes the fact that Christopher Lee turned Bram Stoker’s vampire into his own screen legend in Horror of Dracula all the more remarkable. Filmed in vivid color by director Terence Fisher, Horror of Dracula brought gushing bright red to the movie vampire, which up until then had been mostly relegated to black and white shadows.

    Read more

    Culture

    The Bleeding Heart of Dracula

    By David Crow

    TV

    BBC/Netflix Dracula’s Behind-the-Scenes Set Secrets

    By Louisa Mellor

    With its penchant for gore and heaving bosoms, Horror of Dracula set the template for what became Hammer Film Productions’ singular brand of horror iconography, but it’s also done rather tastefully the first time out here, not least of all because of Lee bring this aggressively cold-blooded version of Stoker’s monster to life. It’s all business with this guy.

    Conversely, Abraham Van Helsing was never more dashing than when played by Peter Cushing in this movie. The film turned both into genre stars, and paved the way for a career of doing this dance time and again.

    The Invisible Man

    After years of false starts and failed attempts at resurrecting the classic Universal Monsters, Universal Pictures finally figured out how to make it work: They called Blumhouse Productions.

    Yep, Jason Blum’s home for micro-budgeted modern horror worked wonders alongside writer-director Leigh Whannell in updating the classic 1933 James Whale movie, and the H.G. Wells novel on which it is based, for the 21st century.

    Read more

    Movies

    How Jason Blum Changed Horror Movies

    By Rosie Fletcher

    Movies

    How The Invisible Man Channels the Original Tale

    By Don Kaye

    Turning the story of a man who masters invisibility into a horrific experience told from the vantage of the woman trying to escape his toxic violence, The Invisible Man becomes a disquieting allegory for the #MeToo era. It also is a devastating showcase for Elisabeth Moss who is compelling as Cecilia, the abused and gaslighted woman that barely found the will to escape, yet will now have to discover more strength since everyone around her shrugs off the idea of her dead ex coming back as an invisible man…

    Lifeforce

    Most assuredly a horror movie for a very acquired taste, there are few who would call Tobe Hooper’s career-destroying Lifeforce a good movie. There probably aren’t even many who would call it a fun movie. But for those with a singular taste for batshit pulp run amok, Lifeforce needs to be seen to be believed: Naked French vampire girls from outer space! Hordes of extras as zombies marauding through downtown London! Lush Henry Mancini music over special effects way outside of Cannon Films’ budget!!! Patrick Stewart as an authority figure possessed by said naked French space vampire, trying to seduce an astronaut via makeout sessions?!

    Read more

    Movies

    Tobe Hooper’s Lifeforce: Space Vampires, Comets, and Nudity

    By Ryan Lambie

    Movies

    The Mummy and Lifeforce: The Strange Parallels

    By Ryan Lambie

    … What is this movie? Why does it exist? We don’t know, but we’re probably more glad it does than the people who made it.

    Magic

    As much a psychological case study as as a traditional horror movie, for those who like their terror rooted in humanity, Magic may be the creepiest iteration of the “killer doll” subgenre since this is about the man who thinks his dummy is alive. Starring Anthony Hopkins before he was Hannibal, or had a “Sir” in front of his name, Magic is the brain child of William Goldman, who adapted his own novel into this movie before he’d go on to do the same for The Princess Bride (as well as adapt Stephen King’s Misery), but after he’d already written Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid and Marathon Man.

    In the film, Hopkins stars as Corky, a down on his luck ventriloquist who tries to get his life together by tracking down his high school sweetheart (Ann-Margret). She’ll soon probably wish he didn’t bother once she realizes Corky believes his ventriloquist dummy Fats really is magic… and is determined to get him to act on the most heinous of impulses.

    The Most Dangerous Game

    Before King Kong, Merian C. Cooper and Ernest B. Schoedsack released The Most Dangerous Game, one of the all-time great pulp movies, based on a short story by Richard Connell. This classic has influenced everything from Predator to The Running Man, The Hunger Games to Ready or Not.

    It’s the story of a big game hunter who shipwrecks on a remote island with an eccentric Russian Count who escaped the Bolshevik Revolution (Leslie Banks). The wayward noble now drinks, studies, and charms his apparently frequent array of unannounced guests, including two other survivors from a previous (suspicious) wreck. The film quickly boils down to a mad rich man determined to hunt his guests as prey across the island for the ultimate thrill.

    Read more

    Movies

    The Most Dangerous Game That Never Ends

    By David Crow

    Culture

    Why King Kong Can Never Escape His Past

    By David Crow

    Man hunting man, man lusting after woman in a queasy pre-Code fashion, this is a primal throwback to adventure yarns of the 19th century, which were still relatively recent in 1932. Shot simultaneously with King Kong, this is 63 brisk minutes of excitement, dread, and delicious overacting. Let the games begin.

    Night of the Living Dead

    “They’re coming to get you, Barbara!”

    The zombie movie that more or less invented our modern understanding of what a zombie movie is, there is little new that can be said about George A. Romero’s original guts and brains classic, Night of the Living Dead. Shot in black and white and on almost no budget, the film reimagined zombies as a horde of ravenous flesh-eaters, as opposed to a lowly servant of the damned and enchanted.

    Read more

    Movies

    Night of the Living Dead: The Many Sequels, Remakes, and Spinoffs

    By Alex Carter

    Games

    The George Romero Resident Evil Movie You Never Saw

    By David Crow

    Still visually striking in black and white, perhaps the key reason to go back to the zombie movie that started it all is due to how tragically potent its central conflict from 1968 remains: When strangers are forced to join forces and barricade in a farmhouse to survive a zombie invasion, the wealthy white businessman is constantly at odds with the young Black man in the group, to the point of drawing weapons…

    Ready or Not

    The surprise horror joy of 2019, Ready or Not was a wicked breath of fresh air from the creative team Radio Silence. With a star-making lead turn by Samara Weaving, the movie is essentially a reworking of The Most Dangerous Game where a bride is being hunted by her groom’s entire wedding party on the night of their nuptials.

    It’s a nutty premise that has a delicious (and broad) satirical subtext about the indulgences and eccentricities of the rich, as the would-be extended family of Grace (Weaving) is only pursuing her because they’re convinced a grandfather made a deal with the Devil for their wealth–and to keep it they must step on those beneath them every generation. Well step, shoot, stab, and ritualistically sacrifice in this cruelest game of hide and seek ever. Come for the gonzo high-concept and stay for the supremely satisfying ending.

    Sisters

    One of the scariest things about the 1972 psychological thriller Sisters is the subliminal sounds of bones creaking and muscles readjusting during the slasher scenes. Margot Kidder plays both title characters: conjoined twins, French Canadian model Danielle Breton and asylum-committed Dominique Blanchion, who had been surgically separated. Director Brian De Palma puts the movie together like a feature-long presentation of the shower scene in Alfred Hitchcock’s Psycho. The camera lingers over bodies, bloodied or pristine, mobile or prone, with fetishistic glee before instilling the crime scenes in the mind’s eye. He allows longtime Hitchcock composer Bernard Herrmann to assault the ear.

    Read more

    Movies

    Ready or Not Ending Explained

    By David Crow

    Movies

    Best Horror Movies on Amazon Prime Right Now

    By Alec Bojalad and 3 others

    De Palma was inspired by a photograph of Masha and Dasha Krivoshlyapova, Russian conjoined twins with seemingly polarized temperaments. There may be no deeper bond than blood, which the film has plenty of, but the real alter ego comes from splitscreen compositions and an outside intruder. The voyeuristic delight culminates in a surgical dream sequence with freaks, geeks, a giant, and dwarves. Nothing is as it seems and an out-of-order telephone is a triggering reminder.

    Us

    Jordan Peele’s debut feature Get Out was a near instant horror classic so anticipation was high for his follow-up. Thanks to an excellent script, Peele’s deep appreciation of pop culture, and some stellar performances, Us mostly lived up to the hype.

    Read more

    Movies

    Us Ending Explained

    By David Crow

    Movies

    Us: How Jeremiah 11:11 Fits in Jordan Peele Movie

    By Rosie Fletcher

    The film tells the story of the Wilson family from Santa Cruz. After a seemingly normal trip to a summer home and the beach, Adelaide (Lupita Nyong’o), Gabe (Winston Duke) and their two kids are confronted by their own doppelgangers, are weird, barely verbal, and wearing red. But then Adelaide is not terribly surprised given her own personal childhood traumas. And that’s only the beginning of the horror at play. Fittingly, Us feels like a feature length Twilight Zone concept done right.

    Vampyr

    A nigh silent picture, Vampyr came at a point of transition for its director Carl Th. Dreyer. The Danish filmmaker, who often worked in Germany and France at this time, was making only his second “talkie” when he mounted this vampire opus. That might be why the movie is largely absent of dialogue. The plot, which focuses on a young man journeying to a village that is under the thrall of a vampire, owes much to Bram Stoker’s Dracula as well as F.W. Murnau’s Nosferatu from some years earlier.

    Yet there horror fans should seek Vampyr out, if for no other reason than the stunning visuals and cinematography. Alternating between German Expressionist influences in its use to shadows to unsettling images crafted in naturalistic light, such as a boatman carrying an ominous scythe, this a a classic of mood and atmosphere. Better still is when they combine, such as when the scythe comes back to bedevil a woman sleeping, trapping us all in her nightmare. Even if its narrative has been told better, before and after, there’s a reason this movie’s iconography lingers nearly a century later.

    cnx.cmd.push(function() { cnx({ playerId: "106e33c0-3911-473c-b599-b1426db57530", }).render("0270c398a82f44f49c23c16122516796"); });

    The post Best Horror Movies Streaming on HBO Max appeared first on Den of Geek.

    source https://www.denofgeek.com/movies/best-horror-movies-hbo-max-streaming/

    View Full
  • aion-rsa
    10.10.2020 - 9 monts ago

    Best Horror Movies Streaming on HBO Max

    https://ift.tt/36Q0Lpl

    Editor’s Note: This post is updated monthly. Bookmark this page and come back every month to see the new horror movies on HBO Max.

    Updated for October 2020

    What ever would we do without horror?

    So much of our daily life is built around logic and known, verifiable facts, and for some, the rest of the time must be supplemented with comforting reassurances that everything is going to be alright. Well if the last year has taught us anything… that’s not the case. Perhaps this is why horror hounds know the best way to face abstract fears is to confront them head on… and preferably with a screen in the way.

    So, with Halloween around the corner, we figured it’s time to get in touch with our illogical, terrified animal brain. That’s where horror and horror movies in particular come in. Gathered here are the best horror movies on HBO Max for your scaring needs.

    Alien

    “In space, no one can hear you scream,” the tagline for Ridley Scott’s 1979 sci-fi/horror epic promised. Well maybe they should have screened this thing in space because I’m sure all that audiences in theaters did was scream.

    Alien has since evolved into a heady, science fiction franchise that has stretched out for decades. The original film, however, is a small-scale, terrifyingly claustrophobic thriller.

    Altered States

    What if you could tap into the vast swaths of the brain you never use? What if you did and didn’t like what we found? And what if it was an absolute psychedelic rush of a cinematic experience?

    All three questions are answered in their own way during Ken Russell’s Altered States, a wild sci-fi thriller. In the film, William Hurt stars as a psychologist who begins experimenting with taking hallucinatory drugs while in a sensory depravation tank.

    Yes, he manages to expand his consciousness; he also begins to expand his physical body as it transforms beneath his skin. Or does it? Well that’s yet another good question…

    An American Werewolf in London

    Arguably the definitive werewolf movie, John Landis’ 1981 horror masterpiece has the single greatest on-screen lycanthropic transformation in movie history… and that’s only one of its appeals.

    Peppered with loving references to the werewolf movies that came before it and a few legitimate laughs to go along with the scares, An American Werewolf in London is remarkably knowing and self-aware, without ever flirting with parody.

    Read more

    Movies

    An American Werewolf in London Is Still the Best Horror Reimagining

    By David Crow

    Movies

    13 Must-See Werewolf Movies

    By Mike Cecchini

    Not enough can be said about Rick Baker’s practical effects, which extend beyond the aforementioned on-screen transformation and into one of the most gruesome depictions of a werewolf attack aftermath you’re ever likely to see. A classic of the era, it still can get under the skin whenever Griffin Dunne’s mutilated corpse rises from the grave to warn his friend to “beware the moon.”

    The Brood

    I bet you never thought placenta could look so tasty, but when Samantha Eggar’s Nola Carveth licks her newborn clean you’ll be craving seconds within the hour. She brings feline intuition to female troubles. We get it. Having a new baby can be scary. Having a brood is terrifying. Feminine power is the most horrifying of all for male directors used to being in control.

    David Cronenberg takes couples therapy one step too far in his 1979 psychological body-horror film, The Brood. When it came out critics called it reprehensible trash, but it is the writer-director’s most traditional horror story. Oliver Reed plays with mental illness like Bill Sikes played with the kids as Hal Raglan, the psychotherapist treating the ex-wife of Frank Carveth (Art Hindle). The film starts slow, unfolding its drama through cuts and bruises.

    Read more

    Movies

    Best Horror Movies on Netflix: Scariest Films to Stream

    By David Crow and 2 others

    Movies

    Katharine Isabelle on How Ginger Snaps Explored the Horror of Womanhood

    By Rosie Fletcher

    Cronenberg unintentionally modifies the body of the Kramer vs. Kramer story in The Brood, but the murderous munchkins at the external womb of the film want a little more than undercooked French toast.

    Carnival of Souls

    Carnival of Souls may be the most unlikely of chillers to appear in the Criterion Collection. Hailing from the great state of Kansas and helmed by commercial director Herk Harvey, who was looking for his big break in features, there is something hand-crafted about the whole affair. There’s also something unmistakably eerie.

    Read more

    Movies

    Carnival Of Souls: The Strange Story Behind the Greatest Horror Movie You’ve Never Seen

    By Joshua Winning

    Movies

    A24 Horror Movies Ranked From Worst to Best

    By David Crow and 3 others

    The story is fairly basic campfire boilerplate, following a woman (Candace Hilligoss) who survives a car crash but is then haunted by the sound of music and visions of the ghoulish dead–beckoning her toward a decrepit carnival abandoned some years earlier–and the acting can leave something to be desired. But the dreadful dreamlike atmosphere is irresistible.

    With a strong sense of fatalism and inescapable doom, the film takes an almost melodic and disinterested gait as it stalks its heroine to her inevitable end, presenting images of the walking dead that linger in the mind long after the credits roll.

    The Curse of Frankenstein

    Hammer is probably best remembered now for its series of Christopher Lee-starring Dracula movies. Yet its oddball Frankenstein franchise deserves recognition too. While Hammer’s efforts certainly pale in comparison to the Frankenstein movies produced by Universal Pictures in the 1930s and ’40s, the Hammer ones remain distinctly unique. Whereas the Creature was the star of the earlier films, so much so the studio kept changing the actor beneath the Jack Pierce makeup after Boris Karloff got fed up three movies in, the not-so-good doctor leads the Hammer alternatives.

    Read more

    Movies

    The Conjuring Timeline Explained: From The Nun to Annabelle Comes Home

    By Daniel Kurland

    Books

    Frankenstein Adaptations Are Almost Never Frankenstein Adaptations

    By Kayti Burt

    Indeed, between bouts of playing the almost sickeningly pious Abraham Van Helsing, Peter Cushing portrayed a perverse and dastardly Victor Frankenstein at Hammer, and it all begins with The Curse of Frankenstein. It isn’t necessarily the best movie in the series, but it introduces us to Cushing’s cruel scientist, played here as less mad than malevolent.

    It also features Christopher Lee in wonderfully grotesque monster makeup. This is the film where Hammer began forming an identity that would become infamous in the realm of horror.

    The Conjuring 2

    Making an effective, truly spooky mainstream horror film is hard enough. But The Conjuring franchise really nailed things out of the gate with a sequel that is every bit as fun and terrifying as the original.

    Patrick Wilson and Vera Farmiga return as paranormal investigators Ed and Lorraine Warren in The Conjuring 2. This time the Warrens head to Great Britain to attend to the Hodgson family, dealing with some poltergeist problems in their Enfield home. The source of the Enfield haunting’s activity contains some of the most disturbing and terrifying visuals in the entire Conjuring franchise and helped to set up a (sadly pretty bad) spinoff sequel in The Nun.

    Doctor Sleep

    Let’s be up front about this: Doctor Sleep is not The Shining. For some that fact will make this sequel’s existence unforgivable. Yet there is a stoic beauty and creepy despair just waiting to be experienced by those willing to accept Doctor Sleep on its own terms.

    Directed by one of the genre’s modern masters, Mike Flanagan, the movie had the unenviable task of combining one of King’s most disappointing texts with the opposing sensibilities of Stanley Kubrick’s singular The Shining adaptation.

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    Movies

    Doctor Sleep Director Mike Flanagan on the Possibility of The Shining 3

    By John Saavedra

    Movies

    Doctor Sleep: Rebecca Ferguson on Becoming the New Shining Villain

    By John Saavedra

    And yet, the result is an effective thriller about lifelong regrets and trauma personified by the ghostly specters of the Overlook Hotel. But they’re far from the only horrors here. Rebecca Ferguson is absolutely chilling as the smiling villain Rose the Hat, and the scene where she and other literal energy vampires descend upon young Jacob Tremblay is the stuff of nightmares. Genuinely, it’s a scene you won’t forget, for better or worse….

    Dracula Has Risen from the Grave

    Hammer Films’ fourth Dracula movie, and third to star the ever reluctant Christopher Lee, is by some fans’ account the most entertaining one. While it lacks the polish and ultimate respectability of Lee’s first outing as the vampire, Horror of Dracula (which you can read more about below), just as it is missing the invaluable Peter Cushing, Dracula Has Risen from the Grave arrived in 1968 at the crossroads of Hammer’s pulpy aesthetic. Their films had not yet devolved into exploitative shlock as they would a few years later, but the censors seemingly were throwing up their hands and allowing for the studio’s vampires to be meaner, bloodier, and sexier.

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    Movies

    Taste the Blood of Dracula: A Hidden Hammer Films Gem

    By Don Kaye

    In this particular romp, Dracula has indeed risen from the grave (yes, again!) because of the good intentions of one German monsignor (Rupert Davies). The religious leader is in central Europe to save souls, but the local denizens of a village won’t go to a church caught in the shadow of Castle Dracula. So the priest exorcises the structure, oblivious that his sidekick is also accidentally dripping blood into the mouth of Dracula’s corpse down the river. Boom he’s back!

    And yet, our fair Count can’t enter his home anymore. So for revenge, Dracula follows the monsignor to his house and lays eyes on the patriarch’s comely young niece (Veronica Carlson). You can probably figure out the rest.

    Eraserhead

    “In Heaven, everything is fine,” sings the Lady in the Radiator in Eraserhead. “You’ve got your good things, and I’ve got mine.”

    You may get something short of paradise, but the insular world David Lynch created for his 1977 experimental existential horror film is a land of mundane wonders, commonplace mysteries, and extremely awkward dinner conversations. Lynch’s first feature film is surrealistic, expressionistic, and musically comic. The minor key score and jarring black and white images bring half-lives to the industrial backdrop and exquisite squalor. At its heart though, Eraserhead is poignant, sad, and ultimately relatable on a universal level.

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    TV

    Buffy: The Animated Series – The Buffy the Vampire Slayer Spin-Off That Never Was

    By Caroline Preece

    Games

    How Scorn Turned the Art of H.R. Giger into a Nightmarish Horror Game World

    By John Saavedra

    Jack Nance’s Henry Spencer is the spiky-haired everyman. He works hard at his job, cares deeply for his deformed, mutant child, and is desperate to please his extended family. Lynch lays a comedy of manners in a rude, crude city. The film is an assault on the senses, and it might take a little while for the viewer’s brains to adjust to the images on the screen; it is a different reality, and not an entirely inviting one, but stick with it. Once you’re in with the in-laws, you’re home free. When you make it to the end, you can tell your friends you watched all of Eraserhead. When they ask you what it’s about, you can tell them you saw it.

    Eyes Without a Face

    “I’ve done so much wrong to perform this miracle,” Doctor Génessier (Pierre Brasseur) confesses in the 1960 horror film Eyes Without a Face. But he says it in French, making it all so much more poignant, allowing it to underscore everything director and co-writer Georges Franju did right. We feel for the respectable plastic surgeon forced to do monstrous things. But the monster behind the title character is his young daughter Christiane (Édith Scob). She spends the majority of the film behind a mask, even more featureless than the unpainted plastic Captain Kirk kid’s costume Michael Myers wore in Halloween. The first time we see her face though, the shock wears off quickly and we are more moved than terrified. 

    Like Val Lewton films, the horror comes from the desolate black-and-white atmosphere, shrouding the claustrophobic suspense in German Expressionism. Maurice Jarre’s score evokes a Gothic carnival as much as a mad scientist’s laboratory. After his daughter’s face is hideously disfigured in an accident, Dr. Génessier becomes obsessed with trying to restore it. We aren’t shown much, until we’re shown too much. We see his heterograft surgical procedure in real time. A woman’s face is slowly flayed from the muscle. The graphic scenes pack more of a visceral shock after all the encroaching dread.

    Godzilla

    As the original and by far still the best Godzilla movie ever produced, this 1954 classic (originally titled Gojira), is one of the many great Showa Era classics that the Criterion Collection and HBO Max are making readily available to American audiences. And if you want to watch one that is actually scary, look no further.

    In this original uncut Japanese form, the movie’s genuine dread of nuclear devastation, as well as nightly air raids, less than 10 years since World War II ended in several mushroom clouds, is overwhelming. Tapping into the real cultural anxiety of a nation left marred by the memory of its dead, as well as the recent incident of a fishing crew being contaminated by unannounced hydrogen bomb testing at Bikini Atoll, Godzilla encapsulates terror for the atomic age in a giant lizard.

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    Movies

    Godzilla: First 15 Showa Era Movies Ranked

    By Don Kaye

    Movies

    Godzilla 1998: What Went Wrong With the Roland Emmerich Movie?

    By Jim Knipfel

    And unlike the sequels there is nothing cuddly or amusing about this original Kaiju with its scarred body and legion of tumors. This is the one Godzilla movie to play it straight, and it still plays today.

    Horror of Dracula

    Replacing Bela Lugosi as Dracula was not easily done in 1958. It’s still not easily done now. Which makes the fact that Christopher Lee turned Bram Stoker’s vampire into his own screen legend in Horror of Dracula all the more remarkable. Filmed in vivid color by director Terence Fisher, Horror of Dracula brought gushing bright red to the movie vampire, which up until then had been mostly relegated to black and white shadows.

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    Culture

    The Bleeding Heart of Dracula

    By David Crow

    TV

    BBC/Netflix Dracula’s Behind-the-Scenes Set Secrets

    By Louisa Mellor

    With its penchant for gore and heaving bosoms, Horror of Dracula set the template for what became Hammer Film Productions’ singular brand of horror iconography, but it’s also done rather tastefully the first time out here, not least of all because of Lee bring this aggressively cold-blooded version of Stoker’s monster to life. It’s all business with this guy.

    Conversely, Abraham Van Helsing was never more dashing than when played by Peter Cushing in this movie. The film turned both into genre stars, and paved the way for a career of doing this dance time and again.

    The Invisible Man

    After years of false starts and failed attempts at resurrecting the classic Universal Monsters, Universal Pictures finally figured out how to make it work: They called Blumhouse Productions.

    Yep, Jason Blum’s home for micro-budgeted modern horror worked wonders alongside writer-director Leigh Whannell in updating the classic 1933 James Whale movie, and the H.G. Wells novel on which it is based, for the 21st century.

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    Movies

    How Jason Blum Changed Horror Movies

    By Rosie Fletcher

    Movies

    How The Invisible Man Channels the Original Tale

    By Don Kaye

    Turning the story of a man who masters invisibility into a horrific experience told from the vantage of the woman trying to escape his toxic violence, The Invisible Man becomes a disquieting allegory for the #MeToo era. It also is a devastating showcase for Elisabeth Moss who is compelling as Cecilia, the abused and gaslighted woman that barely found the will to escape, yet will now have to discover more strength since everyone around her shrugs off the idea of her dead ex coming back as an invisible man…

    Lifeforce

    Most assuredly a horror movie for a very acquired taste, there are few who would call Tobe Hooper’s career-destroying Lifeforce a good movie. There probably aren’t even many who would call it a fun movie. But for those with a singular taste for batshit pulp run amok, Lifeforce needs to be seen to be believed: Naked French vampire girls from outer space! Hordes of extras as zombies marauding through downtown London! Lush Henry Mancini music over special effects way outside of Cannon Films’ budget!!! Patrick Stewart as an authority figure possessed by said naked French space vampire, trying to seduce an astronaut via makeout sessions?!

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    Movies

    Tobe Hooper’s Lifeforce: Space Vampires, Comets, and Nudity

    By Ryan Lambie

    Movies

    The Mummy and Lifeforce: The Strange Parallels

    By Ryan Lambie

    … What is this movie? Why does it exist? We don’t know, but we’re probably more glad it does than the people who made it.

    Magic

    As much a psychological case study as as a traditional horror movie, for those who like their terror rooted in humanity, Magic may be the creepiest iteration of the “killer doll” subgenre since this is about the man who thinks his dummy is alive. Starring Anthony Hopkins before he was Hannibal, or had a “Sir” in front of his name, Magic is the brain child of William Goldman, who adapted his own novel into this movie before he’d go on to do the same for The Princess Bride (as well as adapt Stephen King’s Misery), but after he’d already written Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid and Marathon Man.

    In the film, Hopkins stars as Corky, a down on his luck ventriloquist who tries to get his life together by tracking down his high school sweetheart (Ann-Margret). She’ll soon probably wish he didn’t bother once she realizes Corky believes his ventriloquist dummy Fats really is magic… and is determined to get him to act on the most heinous of impulses.

    The Most Dangerous Game

    Before King Kong, Merian C. Cooper and Ernest B. Schoedsack released The Most Dangerous Game, one of the all-time great pulp movies, based on a short story by Richard Connell. This classic has influenced everything from Predator to The Running Man, The Hunger Games to Ready or Not.

    It’s the story of a big game hunter who shipwrecks on a remote island with an eccentric Russian Count who escaped the Bolshevik Revolution (Leslie Banks). The wayward noble now drinks, studies, and charms his apparently frequent array of unannounced guests, including two other survivors from a previous (suspicious) wreck. The film quickly boils down to a mad rich man determined to hunt his guests as prey across the island for the ultimate thrill.

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    Movies

    The Most Dangerous Game That Never Ends

    By David Crow

    Culture

    Why King Kong Can Never Escape His Past

    By David Crow

    Man hunting man, man lusting after woman in a queasy pre-Code fashion, this is a primal throwback to adventure yarns of the 19th century, which were still relatively recent in 1932. Shot simultaneously with King Kong, this is 63 brisk minutes of excitement, dread, and delicious overacting. Let the games begin.

    Night of the Living Dead

    “They’re coming to get you, Barbara!”

    The zombie movie that more or less invented our modern understanding of what a zombie movie is, there is little new that can be said about George A. Romero’s original guts and brains classic, Night of the Living Dead. Shot in black and white and on almost no budget, the film reimagined zombies as a horde of ravenous flesh-eaters, as opposed to a lowly servant of the damned and enchanted.

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    Movies

    Night of the Living Dead: The Many Sequels, Remakes, and Spinoffs

    By Alex Carter

    Games

    The George Romero Resident Evil Movie You Never Saw

    By David Crow

    Still visually striking in black and white, perhaps the key reason to go back to the zombie movie that started it all is due to how tragically potent its central conflict from 1968 remains: When strangers are forced to join forces and barricade in a farmhouse to survive a zombie invasion, the wealthy white businessman is constantly at odds with the young Black man in the group, to the point of drawing weapons…

    Ready or Not

    The surprise horror joy of 2019, Ready or Not was a wicked breath of fresh air from the creative team Radio Silence. With a star-making lead turn by Samara Weaving, the movie is essentially a reworking of The Most Dangerous Game where a bride is being hunted by her groom’s entire wedding party on the night of their nuptials.

    It’s a nutty premise that has a delicious (and broad) satirical subtext about the indulgences and eccentricities of the rich, as the would-be extended family of Grace (Weaving) is only pursuing her because they’re convinced a grandfather made a deal with the Devil for their wealth–and to keep it they must step on those beneath them every generation. Well step, shoot, stab, and ritualistically sacrifice in this cruelest game of hide and seek ever. Come for the gonzo high-concept and stay for the supremely satisfying ending.

    Sisters

    One of the scariest things about the 1972 psychological thriller Sisters is the subliminal sounds of bones creaking and muscles readjusting during the slasher scenes. Margot Kidder plays both title characters: conjoined twins, French Canadian model Danielle Breton and asylum-committed Dominique Blanchion, who had been surgically separated. Director Brian De Palma puts the movie together like a feature-long presentation of the shower scene in Alfred Hitchcock’s Psycho. The camera lingers over bodies, bloodied or pristine, mobile or prone, with fetishistic glee before instilling the crime scenes in the mind’s eye. He allows longtime Hitchcock composer Bernard Herrmann to assault the ear.

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    Movies

    Ready or Not Ending Explained

    By David Crow

    Movies

    Best Horror Movies on Amazon Prime Right Now

    By Alec Bojalad and 3 others

    De Palma was inspired by a photograph of Masha and Dasha Krivoshlyapova, Russian conjoined twins with seemingly polarized temperaments. There may be no deeper bond than blood, which the film has plenty of, but the real alter ego comes from splitscreen compositions and an outside intruder. The voyeuristic delight culminates in a surgical dream sequence with freaks, geeks, a giant, and dwarves. Nothing is as it seems and an out-of-order telephone is a triggering reminder.

    Us

    Jordan Peele’s debut feature Get Out was a near instant horror classic so anticipation was high for his follow-up. Thanks to an excellent script, Peele’s deep appreciation of pop culture, and some stellar performances, Us mostly lived up to the hype.

    Read more

    Movies

    Us Ending Explained

    By David Crow

    Movies

    Us: How Jeremiah 11:11 Fits in Jordan Peele Movie

    By Rosie Fletcher

    The film tells the story of the Wilson family from Santa Cruz. After a seemingly normal trip to a summer home and the beach, Adelaide (Lupita Nyong’o), Gabe (Winston Duke) and their two kids are confronted by their own doppelgangers, are weird, barely verbal, and wearing red. But then Adelaide is not terribly surprised given her own personal childhood traumas. And that’s only the beginning of the horror at play. Fittingly, Us feels like a feature length Twilight Zone concept done right.

    Vampyr

    A nigh silent picture, Vampyr came at a point of transition for its director Carl Th. Dreyer. The Danish filmmaker, who often worked in Germany and France at this time, was making only his second “talkie” when he mounted this vampire opus. That might be why the movie is largely absent of dialogue. The plot, which focuses on a young man journeying to a village that is under the thrall of a vampire, owes much to Bram Stoker’s Dracula as well as F.W. Murnau’s Nosferatu from some years earlier.

    Yet there horror fans should seek Vampyr out, if for no other reason than the stunning visuals and cinematography. Alternating between German Expressionist influences in its use to shadows to unsettling images crafted in naturalistic light, such as a boatman carrying an ominous scythe, this a a classic of mood and atmosphere. Better still is when they combine, such as when the scythe comes back to bedevil a woman sleeping, trapping us all in her nightmare. Even if its narrative has been told better, before and after, there’s a reason this movie’s iconography lingers nearly a century later.

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